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Flashcards in Intro to Instrument Flight Deck (10):
1

What are two common atmospheric illusions? What can this cause a pilot to do?

- Atmospheric Haze
- Rain on the windshield
These two illusions can cause a pilot to fly a lower-than-normal approach.

2

What are some runway width/slope illusions and what can they cause a pilot to do?

- Upsloping Runway : Can cause a pilot to fly a lower-than-normal approach.
- Downsloping Runway : Can cause a pilot to fly a higher-than-normal approach.
- Narrow Runway : Can cause a pilot to fly a lower-than-normal approach.
- Wide Runway : Can cause a pilot to fly a higher-than-normal approach.

3

What is a false horizon and what can cause it?

It is an illusion that causes the pilot to perceive a fake horizon and potentially fly at a dangerous attitude. The most common cause for this is a sloping cloud.

4

What is DH?

Decision Height on a precision instrument approach. At DH, if runway is in sight, execute a landing, if not in sight, execute a missed approach.

5

What is MDA?

Minimum Descent Altitude. It is the lowest altitude, expressed in MSL, to which descent is authorized on a final approach in execution of a non-precision standard instrument approach.

6

What is FAF?

Final Approach Fix. It identifies the beginning of the final approach segment of an instrument approach procedure. The FAF for a non-precision approach is designated by a Maltese Cross. On precision approaches, a lightning bolt symbol indicates the FAF. If ATC directs a glide slope intercept altitude which is lower than that published, the actual point of glide slope interception becomes the FAF.

7

What is FAP?

Final Approach Point. It applies only to non-precision approaches with no designated FAF, such as an on-airport VOR or NDB. It is the point at which an aircraft has completed the procedure turn, and is established inbound on the final approach course, and may start the final descent. The FAP serves as the FAF and identifies the beginning of the final approach segment.

8

What is IAP?

Instrument Approach Procedure.

9

What is NPI?

Non-precision approach. It is a standard IAP with no electronic glide slope. For example : NDB, VOR, TACAN, ASR, LDA or SDF.

10

What is APCH?

Precision Approach. It is a standard IAP with electronic glide slope path. For example : ILS, MLS, or PAR approaches.