Introduction to Lactation and breast-milk Protein Composition Flashcards Preview

Nutrition through life Part 2 > Introduction to Lactation and breast-milk Protein Composition > Flashcards

Flashcards in Introduction to Lactation and breast-milk Protein Composition Deck (88)
Loading flashcards...
1

Breastfeeding is also known as?

Exterior gestation

2

What is the magic hour?

hour where skin on skin is important to comfort the baby.

3

Why should the baby breastfeed as soon as possible?

To stimulate hormones in the mother after the drop of progesterone and estrogen at the end of pregnancy.

4

Why is a support system necessary to begin breastfeeding?

to learn how to do it, not be afraid, get used to it and to stick with it

5

The suckling stimulus causes the release of what hormones?

release of Prolactin and oxytocin

6

Where is prolactin released from?

Anterior pituitary

7

What does Prolactin do?

stimulate production of milk by alveolar cells in mammary gland

8

Where is oxytocin released from?

Posterior Pituitary

9

What does oxytocin do in breastfeeding?

Stimulate the Myoepithelial cells in mammary glands to contract to expel the milk from the breast

10

What does oxytocin do outside of its involvement in breastfeeding?

induces mothering response by increasing bonding and emotional ties.
thought to act on brain by neurotransmitters
also help uterus return to original size

11

What effect does breastfeeding have on ovulation and how?

suppresses ovulation by decreased levels of progesterone and estrogen with increased levels of prolactin

12

Does a women who is breastfeeding need contraceptives?

No, if the baby is exclusively breastfeeding. has to be pretty frequent

13

What are the advantages of breastfeeding?

proper jaw and tooth development
bacteriologically safe and always fresh
anti-infectious agents and immune cells
nutritionally superior
lower risk of food allergy

14

What are the sources of milk components?

transferred from maternal plasma
synthesized from secretory cells from maternal plasma precursors
Synthesized from other mammary cells in situ

15

What is colostrum?

Breast-milk first 5-7 days

16

Compared to mature milk, what nutritional differences does colostrum have?

more protein and mineral content (Na, K, Cl),
less energy, fat and lactose content
high carotenoid content

17

What is Transitional milk?

milk at 7 days to 3-4 milk

18

Compared to mature milk, what nutritional differences does Transitional milk have?

less protein more lactose and fat

19

What is mature milk? What is it separated into?

After the first month
Fore-milk and Hind-milk

20

Is the mature milk nutritional content constant?

No, changes according to needs (time of day or age)

21

When comparing to average mature milk, early morning milk is characterized by?

more water and lactose to hydrate
called fore-milk

22

What is Hind-milk and what is it characterized by nutritionally?

Higher in fat

23

Why is hind-milk so crucial for young children?

higher in fat which is good for brain development

24

In what way does breast-milk provide immunological properties?

direct action against pathogens
modulation of immune response
promotion of growth and maturation of GI tract

25

What is milk banking?

freezing extra milk in the freezer for later

26

Whey proteins are resistant to what? Why?

proteolysis and acid denaturation
They come with anti-proteases that protect by preserving S-S bonds

27

Which antibodies are present in breast-milk and which immunity do they provide?

IgA, IgM, IgE, IgG
passive immunity

28

Where are the antibodies produced?

locally in mammary gland
except IgG which is adsorbed from plasma

29

What does IgA do and where do they come from?

protect against many pathogens
from B cells from maternal sites exposed to a lot of pathogens

30

Which is the most common antibody?

IgA