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"Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde" Quotes > J&H Quotes > Flashcards

Flashcards in J&H Quotes Deck (46)
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1

Description of Mr Utterson (p3): “lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet.........”

Description of Mr Utterson (p3): “lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow loveable.”

2

Mr Utterson (p3): “I let my brother go to the........in his own way.”

Mr Utterson (p3): “I let my brother go to the devil in his own way.”

3

Description of the back door to Jekyll’s house (p4): The door, which was equipped with neither bell nor knocker, was.........”

Description of the back door to Jekyll’s house (p4): The door, which was equipped with neither bell nor knocker, was blistered and distained.”

4

Enfield’s description of the morning of day he sees Hyde trample the young girl (p5): “a black........morning.”

Enfield’s description of the morning of day he sees Hyde trample the young girl (p5): “a black winter morning.”

5

Enfield’s description of Hyde trampling the young girl (p5): “It sounds like nothing to hear, but it was hellish to see. It wasn’t like a man; it was like some.........”

Enfield’s description of Hyde trampling the young girl (p5): “It sounds like nothing to hear, but it was hellish to see. It wasn’t like a man; it was like some damned Juggernaut.”

6

Enfield’s description of Hyde (p8): “He must be deformed somewhere; he gives a strong feeling of deformity, although I couldn’t specify the point."

Enfield’s description of Hyde (p8): “He must be.........somewhere; he gives a strong feeling of........, although I couldn’t specify the point."

7

Utterson starts to realise how dangerous Hyde is (p11): “out of the shifting, insubstantial mists that had so long baffled his eye, there leaped up the sudden, definite........of a fiend.”

Utterson starts to realise how dangerous Hyde is (p11): “out of the shifting, insubstantial mists that had so long baffled his eye, there leaped up the sudden, definite presentiment of a fiend.”

8

Description of Lanyon (p11): “a hearty, healthy........gentleman.”

Description of Lanyon (p11): “a hearty, healthy, dapper, red-faced gentleman.”

9

Utterson’s dream (p13): The figure in these two phases haunted the lawyer all night; and if at any time he dozed over, it was but to see it glide more stealthily through sleeping houses, or move the more swiftly and still more swiftly, even to dizziness, through wider........of........... city.”

Utterson’s dream (p13): The figure in these two phases haunted the lawyer all night; and if at any time he dozed over, it was but to see it glide more stealthily through sleeping houses, or move the more swiftly and still more swiftly, even to dizziness, through wider labyrinths of lamplighted city.”

10

Description of Hyde (p15): “Mr Hyde was........and......... He gave an impression of deformity without any nameable malformation.”

Description of Hyde (p15): “Mr Hyde was pale and dwarfish. He gave an impression of deformity without any nameable malformation.”

11

Utterson on Hyde (p16): “God bless me, the man seems ........!”

Utterson on Hyde (p16): “God bless me, the man seems hardly human!”

12

Utterson (p16): “O my poor-old Harry Jekyll, if ever I read........signature upon a face, it is on that of your new friend.”

Utterson (p16): “O my poor-old Harry Jekyll, if ever I read Satan’s signature upon a face, it is on that of your new friend.”

13

Description of Jekyll (p19): “a large, well-made........man of fifty, with something of a ........cast perhaps, but every mark of capacity and kindness.”

Description of Jekyll (p19): “a large, well-made, smooth-faced man of fifty, with something of a slyish cast perhaps, but every mark of capacity and kindness.”

14

Jekyll on Lanyon (p19): “that........pedant.”

Jekyll on Lanyon (p19): “that hide-bound pedant.”

15

Jekyll when Hyde is mentioned (p20): “The large handsome face grew........to the very lips, and there came a........about his eyes.”

Jekyll when Hyde is mentioned (p20): “The large handsome face grew pale to the very lips, and there came a blackness about his eyes.”

16

Jekyll to Utterson (p20): “this is a........ matter, and I beg of you to let it sleep.”

Jekyll to Utterson (p20): “this is a private matter, and I beg of you to let it sleep.”

17

The murder of Carew (p22): “a crime of singular.........”

The murder of Carew (p22): “a crime of singular ferocity.”

18

The murder of Carew (p23): “And next moment, with........fury, he was trampling his victim under foot, and hailing down a storm of blows, under which the bones were audibly shattered and the body jumped upon the roadway.”

The murder of Carew (p23): “And next moment, with ape-like fury, he was trampling his victim under foot, and hailing down a storm of blows, under which the bones were audibly shattered and the body jumped upon the roadway.”

19

Description of Soho when Utterson goes to find Hyde (p24): “like a district of some city in a nightmare.”

Description of Soho when Utterson goes to find Hyde (p24): “like a district of some city in a.........”

20

Description of Jekyll’s cabinet (small room) (p27): “three dusty windows........with iron.”

Description of Jekyll’s cabinet (small room) (p27): “three dusty windows barred with iron.”

21

Jekyll (29): “I have had a lesson – O God, Utterson, ........I have had!”

Jekyll (29): “I have had a lesson – O God, Utterson, what a lesson I have had!”

22

Description of London (p30): “The fog still slept on the wing above the........city.”

Description of London (p30): “The fog still slept on the wing above the drowned city.”

23

Utterson visits Jekyll (p32): “the door was........against the lawyer.”

Utterson visits Jekyll (p32): “the door was shut against the lawyer.”

24

Lanyon has deteriorated (p33): “He had his........written legibly upon his face.”

Lanyon has deteriorated (p33): “He had his death-warrant written legibly upon his face.”

25

Lanyon (p33): “I sometimes think if we knew all we should be........to get away.”

Lanyon (p33): “I sometimes think if we knew all we should be more glad to get away.”

26

Jekyll to Utterson (p34): “I have brought on myself a punishment and a danger that I cannot name. If I am the chief of sinners, I am the chief of........also.”

Jekyll to Utterson (p34): “I have brought on myself a punishment and a danger that I cannot name. If I am the chief of sinners, I am the chief of sufferers also.”

27

Utterson fears the worst (p40): “there was borne upon his mind a crushing anticipation of.........”

Utterson fears the worst (p40): “there was borne upon his mind a crushing anticipation of calamity.”

28

Poole (p43): “This drug is wanted........bad, sir, whatever for.”

Poole (p43): “This drug is wanted bitter bad, sir, whatever for.”

29

Poole (p43): “Sir, if that was my master, why had he a mask upon his face? If it was my master, why did he cry out like a........and run from me?”

Poole (p43): “Sir, if that was my master, why had he a mask upon his face? If it was my master, why did he cry out like a rat and run from me?”

30

Hyde/Jekyll’s death (p47): A dismal screech, as of mere........, rang from the cabinet.”

Hyde/Jekyll’s death (p47): A dismal screech, as of mere animal terror, rang from the cabinet.”

31

Lanyon on Hyde (p56): “the odd, subjective disturbance caused by his.........”

Lanyon on Hyde (p56): “the odd, subjective disturbance caused by his neighbourhood.”

32

Hyde to Lanyon (p58): “Or has the greed of.........too much command of you?”

Hyde to Lanyon (p58): “Or has the greed of curiosity too much command of you?”

33

Jekyll’s full statement (p60): “I stood already committed to a profound........of life.”

Jekyll’s full statement (p60): “I stood already committed to a profound duplicity of life.”

34

Jekyll’s full statement (p61): “the perennial........among my members.”

Jekyll’s full statement (p61): “the perennial war among my members.”

35

Jekyll’s full statement (p61): “man is not........, but truly two.”

Jekyll’s full statement (p61): “man is not truly one, but truly two.”

36

Jekyll’s full statement (p61): “It was the curse of........that these incongruous fagots were thus bound together."

Jekyll’s full statement (p61): “It was the curse of mankind that these incongruous fagots were thus bound together."

37

Jekyll on his dark side (p62): “lower elements in my soul.”

Jekyll on his dark side (p62): “lower elements in my.........”

38

Jekyll’s description of the first time he becomes Hyde (p63): “There was something strange in my........, something indescribably new and, from its very novelty, incredibly......."

Jekyll’s description of the first time he becomes Hyde (p63): “There was something strange in my sensations, something indescribably new and, from its very novelty, incredibly sweet."

39

Jekyll (p64): “Edward Hyde, alone in the ranks of........, was pure evil.”

Jekyll (p64): “Edward Hyde, alone in the ranks of mankind, was pure evil.”

40

Jekyll describing his ability to turn back into himself (p66): “like a........, strip off these lendings and ........headlong into the sea of liberty.”

Jekyll describing his ability to turn back into himself (p66): “like a schoolboy, strip off these lendings and sprint headlong into the sea of liberty.”

41

Jekyll (p67): “I thought I sat beyond the reach of .........”

Jekyll (p67): “I thought I sat beyond the reach of.........”

42

Jekyll after he (Hyde) kills Carew (p71): “(I) fled from the scene of these excesses, at once glorying and trembling, my lust of........gratified and stimulated, my love of........screwed to the utmost peg.”

Jekyll after he (Hyde) kills Carew (p71): “(I) fled from the scene of these excesses, at once glorying and trembling, my lust of evil gratified and stimulated, my love of life screwed to the utmost peg.”

43

Jekyll on Hyde (p74): “He, I say – I cannot say, I. That child of........had nothing human.”

Jekyll on Hyde (p74): “He, I say – I cannot say, I. That child of Hell had nothing human.”

44

Jekyll on Hyde (p75): “the brute that........within me.”

Jekyll on Hyde (p75): “the brute that slept within me.”

45

Jekyll (p76): “The powers of Hyde seemed to have grown with the........of Jekyll.”

Jekyll (p76): “The powers of Hyde seemed to have grown with the sickliness of Jekyll.”

46

Jekyll (p77): “when I know how he fears my power to cut him off by........, I find it in my heart to........him.”

Jekyll (p77): “when I know how he fears my power to cut him off by suicide, I find it in my heart to pity him.”