Known and unknown words Flashcards Preview

GRE vocabulary > Known and unknown words > Flashcards

Flashcards in Known and unknown words Deck (21):
1

peccadillo

Venial sin

Slight offence

2


wanton

Impetuous

Temerity

Reckless

Wanton describes something excessive, uncontrolled and sometimes even cruel. The principal sees a food fight as a wanton act of vandalism done with wanton disregard for the rules, but the kids might just see it as fun.

3

Convoke

To call together to a meeting

4

Distaff

Muliebral

Maternal side, women's work

A persons's muliebrity is her femininity or womanliness. An idolizing kindergartner might admire her dress-wearing, curly-haired teacher's muliebrity.

5

Misanthrope

Hater of humankind

6

Veracity

Probity

Verity

Integrity, honesty

7

Unequivocal

Patent

Clear, without a doubt.

If there is no doubt about it, it's unequivocal. An unequivocal response to a marriage proposal? "Yes. Yes! A thousand times yes!"

8

Inure

Indurate

Toughen up.

9

consecrated

sacrosanct

Venerated

Sacred. Above criticism.

10

Hermetic

airtight, isolated

If you want to keep cookies crisp for a long time, store them in a jar with a hermetic, or airtight, seal. Hermetic means sealed so that no air can get in.

11

Paean

Panegyric

Tribute

A paean is a hymn of praise or thanksgiving. You might sing a paean in church, where many hymns extol the greatness of God.

12

Revivification

Restore to life

13

Triage

prioritise

14

Erudite

Learned, scholarly

15

Baleful

threatening harm, mean

Baleful means the foreshadowing of tragic or evil events. If no one's listening in class and your teacher reprimands you with a baleful glance, expect a pop quiz.

16

Irascible

easily angered, crotchety


If you're irascible, you get angry easily — perhaps blowing up in rage when someone brushes into you.

Irascible comes from the Latin root ira, which means "anger" or "rage," the same root that gives us the word ire, "anger." The -sc in the middle of irascible, means "becoming," so irascible doesn't just mean you're angry — it's got action built into it. If you're looking for a fight most of the time, then you're irascible — ready for the spark that's going to set you on fire.

17

Politic

Shrewd

Your friend who's obsessed with watching Congressional debates and listening to experts discuss the bills being voted on in the Senate has a keen interest in politics, or the details of governing or managing a state or a country.

18

Invective

Verbally abusive

Invective is harsh, abusive language, like, "you dirty rotten scoundrel." I'm sure you can think of harsher and more obscene examples, but we won't get into them here.

19

Ossify

Become inflexible in opinions.

Ossify means to become bony. When a baby is born, some of their "bones" are actually soft cartilage, which allows for growth. As the child grows, these soft areas ossify into actual bone. The knee cap, for example, begins to ossify between ages 3 and 6.

20

Heuristic

Enabling a person to discover or learn something for themselves.

A heuristic is a rule or method that helps you solve problems faster than you would if you did all the computing. It sounds fancy, but you might know a heuristic as a "rule of thumb."

21

Inconstancy


When your friend promises to save you the last piece of gum but doesn't, you might curse her for her inconstancy. Inconstancy means changeability, not sticking to a predetermined course.

Inconstancy is a word often associated with love––if someone promises to love you forever in eighth grade but ends up falling for someone else in ninth, their behavior testifies to the inconstancy of their love. Or the inconstancy of youth. Or maybe just the inconstancy of love in genera