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Flashcards in Lameness Deck (60)
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1

You suspect a horse is lame.

What are the 2 area's of its body that you should watch closely to DX which area is causing the problem?

  • Poll
  • Hip

(front end vs. hind end)

2

What happens to the horse's head

when a lame horse trots?

they raise their head when the lame front foot strikes the ground.

3

List the 3 clinical reasons for lameness.

  • Pain (majority)
  • Mechanical
  • Neurological defect

4

In what age group does OCD present?

Young horses that just started training

5

In what age group does OA more commonly present?

Older horses

6

What are 2-3 year old Throughbred racehorses are prone to?

Stress Fractures

7

What are Standardbred racehorses prone to?

Carpal lameness

8

What are 3 day Event horses prone to?

Back pain

9

What are Warmblood dressage horses prone to?

  • Distal tarsal joint arthritis
  • Proximal suspensory desmitis

10

What are Polo ponies prone to?

SDFT tendonitis

11

What one question you should be sure to ask when taking the HX of a lame horse?

When was the horse last shod?

12

Which angular limb deformity is this?

Varus

"Bow legged"

13

Which angular limb deformity is this?

Valgus

"knock kneed"

14

What 2 things do horses with broken back (hoof-pastern axis) often get?

  • Chronic heel soreness
  • Proximal suspensory desmistis

15

Severe carpal valgus will cause what 2 problems for horses?

  • Carpal lameness
  • Medial splints

16

List 3 things that this horse will be prone to

due to its poor hind end conformation

  • Upward fixation of the Patella
  • Suspensory desmitits
  • OA in the distal hock joints

("straight through the hocks")

17

What will this horse be prone to due to its poor confirmation?

  • OA of the distal hock joints
  • Desmitis of the long plantar ligament (curb)

18

You are performing a PE on a lame horse.

What is one area of the body that is every important, but often overlooked?

The mouth

Can be causing the horse pain & discomfort, which will throw off their natural balance

19

You find these while performing a PE on your client's horse.

What should you tell the owner?

  • They are wind puffs → thickening of the tendon sheath
    • Non-pathogenic
    • Assocaited with heavy "work"
    • No need to worry about them

20

If a horse comes to you 3-legged lame, what are your top 3 concerns?

  • FX
  • Subsolar abscess
  • Septic synovial structure

21

Where does lameness almost always originate?

In the area distal to the carpus or hock

 

22

Which type of lamess gait is seen most frequently in lameness exams?

Supporting limb lamess

(lameness during weight bearing)

23

Swinging limb lamenesss is often due to a _______________.

 

Mechanical deficit

(i.e. fibrotic myopathy, stringhalt)

24

What grade would you give a horse if the lameness is consistently observable at a trot, under all circumstances?

Grade 3

25

What grade do you give a horse with lameness that is obvious & has marked nodding, hitching &/o shortened stride?

Grade 4

26

What grade do you give a horse that is unable/refuses to move?

Grade 5

27

How do you evaluate the forelimb gait of a horse?

  • Look for "head nod"
  • Listen to feet strike the ground
    • sound forelimb will be louder
  • Look at phase of stride/limb flight

28

What is the cause of 80-90% of lameness in horses?

  • Palmar heel pain/Navicular syndrome
  • Solar bruising/abscess
  • DJD

"in the foot"

29

How will a bilaterally lame horse appear to move?

They will have a short, shuffling gait

30

How do you best observed hind end lameness?

When the horse is being trotted away from you