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Flashcards in midterms Deck (23)
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1

Lascaux cave painting

15,000 – 10,000 BCE

Lascaux, France

2

Fremont rock painting

2,000 BCE

Utah, US

3

Sumerian pictograph

3,100 BCE

Note: Use of grid to divide space; images to represent words.

4

Sumerian clay tablet

2,500 BCE

Note: Shows pictographs evolving into cuneiform (star, god, water)

5

Egyptian hieroglyph

2,000 BCE

Note: These cartouches show how hieroglyphs represented certain sounds, spelling out the names Ptolomy and Cleopatra.

6

The Rosetta Stone

Carved in 196 BCE, discovered in 1799.

Note: This discovery allowed researchers to decipher hieroglyphs, because it contained the same text in Egyptian and Greek.

7

Unknown Japanese artist

After 1868

Note: Shows flatness and floral ornamentation that would be embraced by Art Nouveau.

8

Kitagawa Utamaro

Late 1700’s

Note: Subdued colors, black outline, no shading or gradient.

9

Katsushika Hokusai, “Red Fuji”

1830

Note: Woodcuts were popular in Japan at this time, and the technique resulted in flat, colorful images.

10

Jules Cheret

1879

Note: Large figures, “greater unity of word and type.” Cheret is known as the Father of the Modern Poster.

Art Nouveau

11

Eugene Grasset

1883

Note: Dividing space into panels and inserts; decorative pattern moved to foreground.

Art Nouveau

12

Aubrey Beardsley, “The Eyes of Herod”.

1894

Note: Great and innovative use of positive and negative shapes.

Art Nouveau

13

Aubrey Beardsley, “Morte d’Arthur”

1893

Note: An eerie, “evil” version of Arts and Crafts patterning.

Art Nouveau

14

Charles Ricketts, title page for “The Sphinx”

1894

Note: Wanted to design entire books, not just add illustrations to books.

Art Nouveau

15

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, “Moulin Rouge”

1891

Flat shapes become symbols; silhouettes; subdued colors.

Art Nouveau

16

Steinlen

1896

Contemporary of Toulouse-Lautrec; Japanese influence; ornamental “halo”; image in front of lettering (tail).

Art Nouveau

17

Alphonse Mucha, “Gismonda”

1894

Note: Art Nouveau had arrived with this work. Overnight sensation.

Art Nouveau

18

Alphonse Mucha, ad for Job cigarette papers

1898

Note: Ornamentation fills the entire frame, almost upstaging the woman.

Art Nouveau

19

Margaret MacDonald

1901

Note: Ornamentation starts to look more geometric;  less organic; symmetrical.

Late Art Nouveau.

20

Talwin Morris

1900

Late Art Nouveau.

Note: Simplification of ornamentation; more geometric and repetitive.

21

Moser, Roller, Koenig, ads for Ver Sacrum

1899

Note: Ver Sacrum was the key publication for the Vienna Secession. Every aspect of it was designed with a sense of unity in mind.

22

Peter Behrens, A Celebration of Life and Art (spread).

1900

Note: Geometric, rectilinear frame and sans serif font.

23

Berthold Foundry, Akzidenz Grotesk (or Standard) typefaces.

1899- 1906

Note: San serif typefaces were an expression of modern values.