Neuropharmacology Intro Flashcards Preview

Pharmacology Test #6 > Neuropharmacology Intro > Flashcards

Flashcards in Neuropharmacology Intro Deck (45)
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1

Cholinergic transmission is important for

cognitive function, sensitization to incoming stimuli, movement control

2

Describe the difference between nACh receptors and mACh receptors.

nAch receptors are ligand gated cation channels whereas mACh receptors are GPCRs

3

Where are cholinergic neurons?

concentrated in the basal forebrain and pons, but numerous cholinergic interneurons are found int he cortex and basal ganglia

4

Dopamine transmission is important for

natural rewards and motor function

5

Problems in dopamine transmission is implicated in diseases or disorders such as

schizophrenia, parkinsons disease, addiction, depression and ADHD

6

Two varieties of GPCR dopamine receptors

D1-type (D1 and D5) and D2-type (including D2, D3, and D4)

7

Where are dopamine neurons?

situated in the midbrain, either the ventral tegmental area or the substantia nigra pars compacta

8

Norepinephrine activates

adrenergic receptors (GPCRs), ainly alph1 and/or alpha2 in the CNS

9

NE is involved in

memory, pain transmission, and salience

10

NE transmission is altered in

depression and addiction

11

NE neurons are located in

the pons, specifically the locus coeruleus

12

Serotonin activates

either 5-HT3 ligand gated cation channels, or GPCR-type 5-HT receptors

13

Serotonin is important in

reward, learning, and mood/affect, and is thought to play a major role in depression and possibly schizophrenia

14

Where are serotonin neurons located?

in the midbrain/pons, specificially inthe raphe

15

GABA is produced from

glutamate

16

Major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS

GABA

17

GABA activates

GABAA type ligand gated Cl- channels, and GABAB and GABAC receptors which are GPCRs

18

Where is GABA produced?

produced throughout the brain by numerous cell types, and is altered in many disorders, including epilepsy, muscle spasticity, and addictions such as alcoholism

19

Main excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain

Glutamate

20

What does glutamate bind to?

Ion channels (AMPA, NMDA) and GPCRs (mGluRs)

21

Glutamate may be a useful pharmacologic target in which diseases?

epilepsy and schizophrenia

22

Two categories of ligand-gated

ion channels and G protein coupled receptors

23

HCN channels are

cyclic nucleotide-gated channels

24

Ligand that modifies HCN channels

cAMP or cGMP

25

Describes what happens when a GIRK channel is activated

activating a GPCR coupled to a GIRK channel results in enhanced outward K+ currents, which serve to hyperpolarize the membrane potential and keep the cell "clamped" near the equilibrium potential for K+, which is around -90mV

26

Where are NT transporters usually located?

usually located presynaptically where they remove NT molecules from the synaptic cleft and return them back inside the presynaptic terminal

27

Which ion do most neurotransmitter transporters use?

most are Na+ symporters, making them electrogenic

28

How is electrical activity altered by drugs

by directly affecting the function of ion channels, or indirectly by changing the overall number or function of important targets in the CNS

29

Where do drugs act?

NT synthesis, NT storage, NT reuptake, autoreceptors, presynaptic receptors, postsynaptic receptors

30

What will decreasing the action of NT transporters do?

will decrease re-uptake, and therefore prolong the action of drugs released into the synaptic cleft