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Flashcards in New material for Final Part 2 Deck (33)
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1

T/F: Brodie's abscess formations may be sterile with no mcroorganisms cultured.

True

2

What is the main way to differentiate infections from tumors on xray?

infections do not respect growth plates or joint spaces

3

What is the proper treatment for bone infections?

coffee enemas

...jk it's antibiotics.

4

Joint effusion, juxtaarticular osteoporosis, erosions, joint space loss, and lytic destruction that CROSSES THE JOINT space...what is this?

septic arthritis

5

How many mm is the teardrop distance?

>11mm and >2mm difference from the opposite joint

6

unilateral sacroilitis

think infection

7

Where do spinal infections begin in adolescents?
In adults?

in the disc (still vascular);
anterior endplates then disc then soft tissue (paraspinal mass)

8

Where are spinal infections most common?

lumbars

9

What joints have a higher incidence of infection in IV drug users?

SI joints

10

What are some early radiographic features of bone infection?

rapid disc space loss and/or endplate destruction

11

T/F: Osteomyelitis typically shows up in the first week on plain films.

False;

12

t/F: Osteomyelitis may show up on bone scintigraphy within hours.

True

13

What type of imaging gives a direct view of intramedullary disorders and may precede bone scan findings?

MRI

14

T/F: Osteomyelitis findings on MRI will show increased (white) signal intensity on T1 and decreased on T2.

False; white is right on T1 so pathology findings are dark or decreased on T1, increased on T2

15

What is the classic finding associated with osteomyelitis in the spine?

disc space loss with endplate destruction

16

Word association: Nonsuppurative osteomyelitis, Pott's disease, and mycobacterium

Tuberculosis

17

What is the most common cause of infection-related death in the world, with 15 million people infected in the US?

Tuberculosis

18

T/F: Only 1-3% of TB cases involve the skeleton, but this is the most common secondary form of TB

true

19

TB in the skeleton usually involves weight-bearing joints and multiple levels. What is the most common area for TB in the skeleton?

TL junction

20

How does TB of the spine look different than osteomyelitis?

multiple level involved and paraspinal cold abscesses with Ca+

21

Word association: weight loss, fever, chills, night sweats, Gibbous formation and granulomas on chest film in 50%

TB

22

What is the Phemister's Triad?

sign of tuberculosis septic arthritis:
Juxtarticular osteoporosis, marginal erosions, and slow joint space loss

23

What is the term for death of osseous cellular and marrow components of bone with an epiphyseal predispostion, especially of the femur head and humeral head?

Avascular Necrosis

24

What are some synonyms for avascular necrosis (AVN)?

osteonecrosis, ischemic necrosis, or osteochondrosis

25

When does epiphyseal necrosis (AVN) become clinically evident?

with articular surface collapse

26

Surgery, trauma, alcoholism, and corticosteroid use are common etiologies for AVN but what is the most common etiology?

spontaneous/idiopathic

27

What is the term for AVN in children?

Legg-Perthes disease

28

The acronym PLASTIC RAGS is used to list the different causes of AVN. What does it stand for?

Pancreatitis/pregnancy
Legg-Perthes disease/Lupus
Alcoholism/Atherosclerosis
Steroids
Trauma
Idiopathic/Infection
Caisson disease/Collagen disease
Rheumatoid arthritis/Radiation treatment
Amyloid
Gaucher disease
Sickly cell disease/spontaneous

29

What is the time frame from initial infarction to healed deformity with AVN?

2-8 years

30

During the revascularization phase of AVN, new bone is deposited directly onto dead bone, thickening the trabeculation and increasing bone density. What is this termed?

"creeping substitution"