pathologyflashcardsXV - The Oral Cavity and the GI Tract Preview

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Flashcards in pathologyflashcardsXV - The Oral Cavity and the GI Tract Deck (141)
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1

Small, painful, rounded superficial erosions of the mouth, covered with a gray-white exudate and having an erythematous rim.

Aphthous ulcers (canker sores)(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 580

2

Extremely common infection caused by herpes simplex virus type 1.

Herpetic stomatitis(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 580

3

Test used to identify HSV infection.

Tzanck test(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 580

4

Glassy, intranuclear acidophilic inclusion bodies.

Herpes simplex virus(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 580

5

Adherent white, curd-like, circumscribed plaque within the oral cavity. The pseudomembrane can be scraped off revealing an underlying granular erythematous inflammatory base.

Oral candidiasis /"thrush"(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 581

6

An oral lesion seen in patients with HIV. White confluen patches with "hairy" or corrugated surface with marked epithelial thickening.

Hairy leukoplakia(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 581

7

Hairy leukoplakia is caused by what infectious agent?

Epstein-Barr virus(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 581

8

A whitish, well-defined mucosal patch or plaque caused by epidermal thickening or hyperkeratosis, commonly seen in the vermillion border of the lower lip, buccal mucosa, hard and soft palates.

Leukoplakia(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 581

9

Oral lesion showing a corrugated surface caused by excessive hyperkeratosis. Recurring and spreads insiduously, resulting in a warty-type lesion.

Verrucous leukoplakia(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 582

10

Red, velvety, granular, circumscribed lesions of the mouth with poorly defined, irregular boundaries. High malignant transformation rate.

Erythroplakia(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 582

11

Most frequent site of oral cavity carcinomas.

Vermillion border of the lateral margins of the lower lip(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 582

12

Pearly white to gray, circumscribed thickenings of the oral mucosa, which grows in exophytic pattern to produce a visible and palpable nodular, eventually fungating lesions.

Oral cavity carcinoma(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 583

13

Most common lesion of the salivary glands resulting from blockage or rupture of a salivary gland duct.

Mucocele(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 583

14

Inflammation of the salivary glands.

Sialadenitis(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 583

15

Salivary and lacrimal gland inflammatory enlargement presenting as painless lesions, and dry mouth. Can be caused by sarcoidosis, leukemia, and lymphoma.

Mikulicz syndrome(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 583

16

Incomplete relaxation of lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing.

Achalasia(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 585

17

Destruction of the myenteric plexus of the esophagus, duodenum, colon and ureter caused by a flagellate protozoa.

Chagas disease(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 585

18

Causative agent for Chagas disease.

Trypanosoma cruzi(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 585

19

Adult with progressive dysphagia to solids and eventually to all foods, caused by a narrowing of the lower esophagus, usually as a result of chronic inflammatory disease.

Stenosis(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 585

20

A congenital defect which causes the esophagus to end in a blind-ended pouch.

Esophageal atresia(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 585

21

Most common type of esophageal atresia.

Esophageal atresia with distal tracheoesophageal fistula(Type C)(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 585

22

Thin membranes of normal esophageal tissue consisting of mucosa and submucosa that can partially obstruct the esophagus.

Esophageal web(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 585

23

Congenital esophageal webs commonly appear in which segment of the esophagus?

Middle and inferior third of the esophagus(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 585

24

A diverticulum of the mucosa of the pharynx just above the cricopharyngeal muscle.

Zenker's diverticulum(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 586

25

A triangular area in the pharyngeal wall where a Zenker's diverticulum may develop.

Killian's triangle(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 586

26

Protrusion of the stomach above the diaphragm, creating a bell-shaped dilation, bounded below by the diaphragmatic narrowing.

Sliding hernia(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 586

27

Hernia wherein a portion of the stomach, usually along the greater curvature, enters the thorax through the widened space between the muscular crura.

Paraesophgeal (rolling) hernia(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 586

28

Longitudinal tears along the gastroesophageal junction seen in chronic alcoholics after a bout of retching or vomiting.

Mallory-Weiss tears(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 586

29

Tortuous dilated veins lying within the submucosa of the distal esophagus and proximal stomach due to increased portal pressure, usually due to cirrhosis. May cause massive hemorrhage if ruptured.

Esophageal varices(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 587

30

Presence of eosinophils in the epithelial layer, basal zone hyperplasia and elongation of lamina propria papillae are histologic findings in this condition.

Reflux esophagitis(TOPNOTCH)Robbins Basic Pathology, 8th Ed p. 588