Plastic Surgery Flashcards Preview

Surgical Recall > Plastic Surgery > Flashcards

Flashcards in Plastic Surgery Deck (44):
1

What is blepharoplasty?

Eyelid surgery, removing excess skin or fat

2

What is a face lift?

Removal of excess facial skin via hairline/chin/ear incisions

3

What are Langer's lines?

Natural skin lines of minimal tension.
Incisions perpendicular to Langer's lines result in larger scars than incision parallel to the lines.

4

What is mammoplasty?

Breast surgery, reduction or augmentation

5

What is polydactyly?

Extra fingers

6

What is rhinoplasty?

Nose surgery, after trauma or cosmetic

7

What is syndactyly?

Webbed fingers

8

What are the phases of wound healing?

"In Every Fresh Cut"
1. Inflammation
2. Epithelialization
3. Fibroplasia
4. Contraction.

9

What is the inflammation phase of wound healing?

Vasoconstriction followed by vasodilation, capillary leak

10

What is the epithelialization phase of wound healing?

Epithelial coverage of wound

11

What is the fibroplasia phase of wound healing?

Fibroblasts and accumulation of collagen, elastin, and reticulin

12

What is the wound contraction phase of wound healing?

Myofibroblasts contract wound

13

What is the maximal contraction of a wound in mm/day?

0.75 mm/day

14

What degree of bacterial contamination prevents epithelialization?

> 100,000 organisms/g tissue

15

In which structures does the epithelium grow from superficial burns and wounds?

Epithelial lining of sweat glands and hair follicles

16

In which structures does the epithelium grow in full-thickness burns?

From wound margins, grows in

17

What malignant ulcer is associated with a long-standing scar or burn?

Marjolin's ulcer

18

Which contracts more: an STSG or an FTSG?

STSG contracts up to 41% in surface area, whereas an FTSG contracts little, if at all

19

What is granulation tissue?

Within 4-6 days after an open wound, development of capillary beds and fibroblasts provides a healthy base for epithelial growth from wound edges.
This tissue also resists bacterial infection.

20

What local factors impair wound healing?

Hematoma, seroma, infection, tight sutures, tight wrap, movement or disturbance of the wound

21

What generalized conditions impair wound healing?

Anemia, malnutrition, steroids, cancer, radiation, hypoxia, sepsis

22

What helps wound healing in patients taking steroids?

Vitamin A

23

When does a wound gain more than 90% of its maximal tensile strength?

After 6 weeks

24

What is a laceration?

A jagged wound

25

What is an abrasion?

Superficial skin removal

26

What is a contusion?

Bruise without a break in the skin

27

What is a hypertrophic scar?

Hypertrophic scar within original wound margins

28

What is a keloid?

Proliferative scar tumor progressively enlarging scar beyond original wound margins

29

Why not clean lacerations with Betadine?

Harmful to and inhibits normal healthy tissue

30

What is the best way to clean out a laceration?

Normal saline irrigation

31

What is an STSG?

Split Thickness Skin Graft:
Includes the epidermis and a variable amount of the dermis.

32

What is a FTSG?

Full Thickness Skin Graft:
Includes the entire epidermis and dermis.

33

What are the prerequisites for a skin graft to take?

1. Bed must be vascularized (a graft to a bone or tendon will not take).
2. Bacteria must be

34

What is a better bed for a skin graft: fascia or fat?

Fascia (better blood supply)

35

How do you increase surface area of a STSG?

Mesh it (also allows for blood/serum to be removed from underneath the graft)

36

How does an STSG get nutrition for the first 24 hours?

Imbibition

37

Where does a random skin flap get its blood supply?

From the dermal-subdermal plexus

38

Where does an axial skin flap get its blood supply?

It is vascularized by direct cutaneous arteries

39

What is the arterial supply to the forehead flap?

Superficial temporal artery.
Often used for intra-oral lesions.

40

What is the arterial supply to the deltopectoral flap?

Second, third, and fourth anterior perforators of the internal mammary artery.
Often used for head and neck wounds.

41

What is the arterial supply to the groin flap?

Superficial circumflex iliac artery.
Allows coverage of hand and forearm wounds.

42

What is the most common cause of flap loss?

Venous thrombosis

43

What is a free flap?

Flap separated from all vascular supply that requires microvascular anastomosis

44

What is a TRAM flap?

Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous flap