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Early Modern England and Wales > Popular Politics > Flashcards

Flashcards in Popular Politics Deck (31):
1

Why should we treat our perceptions of EM politics with caution?

Focus on the elite due to the mass evidence focussing on them

2

Which Historian is the 'Public Sphere' associated with?

Jürgen Habermas

3

What is the 'Public Sphere'?

A public place of discussion of governments by private individuals

4

What are examples of the 'Public Sphere'?

Newspapers, Coffee Houses

5

Why was the 'Public Sphere' a place of critical thinking?

Not controlled by the state

6

What political ideology does the 'Public Sphere' adhere to?

Marxism

7

Why is the 'Public Sphere' theory Marxist?

Set up ability to overthrow governments

8

What does the 'Public Sphere' theory on overthrowing government suggest about its presence in the EM period?

Before this process

9

What has recent research suggested about the presence of the 'Public Sphere' in the EM period?

EM Phenomenon, print culture alongside rumour

10

What has Historiography focussed on regarding EM popular politics?

State Institutions (Kings)
People (Laws)

11

Why have historians critiqued the notion that political culture was an elite phenomenon?

They have found it a places lower down that have been previously ignored

12

What example is there that proves political culture was not elite in nature?

The Elite had to acknowledge the populace, for example, England's aggressive Protestation dealing with Catholic Spain unnerving

13

What did the government believe about the public and politics?

Should not be concerning selves with politics,

14

What were Corrants?

Popular 1620s news sheets from Netherlands (free press)

15

What does the popularity of Corrants show?

That populace had access to news despite illegality

16

What term was very common in the EM period?

'What News?'

17

When and why did censorship laws collapse?

1640s/50s alongside reign of Charles I

18

What caused the collapse of censorship laws?

Explosion of printed press

19

What did the explosion of the printed press create?

A national, informed political culture

20

Who was targetted with the printed press?

The literate

21

Was literacy a blockade to a national political culture?

No, papers were read aloud and had pictures

22

What type of culture remained, esp. outside London?

Oral Culture

23

Why were Statutes passed?

To attempt to curb public discussion

24

What did Statutes prove?

That people were talking about Mary I, a catholic

25

What example is there of rumour influencing the people?

Pilgrimage of Grace, 1536

26

How did rumour influence the Pilgrimage of Grace?

Triggered the pilgrimage, threat of baptism tax for example

27

Did Wales experience rumour in the same way with its linguistic barrier?

No, rumour transcended the barrier through bards and political gossip

28

What were libels?

Rhymes/poems that shaded into political ballads

29

What's an example of a libel?

The alleged homosexuality of the Duke of Buckingham

30

When did Habermas believe the Public Sphere was created?

18th Century

31

Was there a public sphere before the 18th Century?

Yes, existed in different forms and people weren't apolitical