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Flashcards in Review Study Guide Deck (37)
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1

what structures are involved with articulation?

mandible
tongue
lips
teeth
hard palate (alveolar ridge)
velum
uvula

2

what structures are involved with phonation?

larynx
vocal folds

3

what structures are involved in resonation?

oral, nasal and pharyngeal cavaities

4

what structures are involved in respiration?

lungs, airways, trachea, rib cage, abdomen, diaphragm.

5

what are the bilabial sounds?

p, b, m

6

The average number of glottal openings per second is known as a persons....

fundamental frequency

7

what is timbre?

tonal quality unique to each person.

8

what is the mechanism involved in vocal fold vibration?

subglottal air pressure

9

what position are the vocal folds at the onset of phonation?

they move toward the midline into adducted position.

10

what is the process of phonation?

vocal fold adduct
subglottal pressure builds
vocal folds forced apart
glottis opens
pressure decreases
vocal folds adduct again

11

why is the velopharyngeal mechanism important for resonance?

it helps to decipher between speech sounds (nasal and nonnasal)

12

is the velopharyngeal port opened or closed for nasals sounds?

open

13

what role does resonance play in the production of vowels?

vowels are produced by manipulating the mouth openings and tongue positions (resonators) , creating different vowel qualities.

14

what are harmonics related to?

fundamental frequency

15

during inhalation, the alveolar pressure is

less than the atmospheric pressure

16

The velopharyngeal port is a passage between the nasopharynx and the

oropharynx

17

what is an Ankyloglossia?

congenital oral anomaly that restricts the tongue's range of motion (tongue-tie). It is caused by an unusually short, thick lingual frenulum, connecting the underside of the tongue to the floor of the mouth.

18

what is an glossectomy

surgical removal of all or part of the tongue

19

what type of malocclusion is an overbite?

II

20

what type of malocclusion is an underbite?

III

21

what is sound is produced with a relatively open vocal tract that represents a phoneme in a language?

vowel

22

what is Diadochokinesis?

rapid repetition of several different sounds in a row. A traditional oral motor exercise.

23

If a child born with a cleft palate has surgery to correct the problem before the age of 2, most likely the child will or will not have permanent effects on articulation.

Depends.

24

why might someone needs a palatal prosthesis?

muscular inability to sufficiently close the port between the nasopharynx and oropharynx during speech and/or swallowing.

25

A closure of the velopharyngeal port is necessary for speech and swallowing. It results in the following:

All phonemes, except NASALS

26

What are some syndromes that may cause a lack of closure of the velopharyngeal port?

cleft palate
DS
stroke
head injury
ALS

27

What is them velopharyngeal inadequacy and why does it make it difficult to build intraoral air pressure?

improper closure of the velopharyngeal. It will allow air to escape through the nose instead of the mouth during speech.

28

With velopharyngeal inadequacy, a common artic pattern is to shift the production of __________ to the _______ portion of the oral cavity.

consonants
posterior

29

Is speech a neuromotor task? T/F

yes

30

Give an example of what a clinican might ask a child to articulate using Diadochokinesis

puh-tuh-kuh

31

What are two reasons why normal hearing essential for oral speech and language acquisition?

1. communication behavior
2. following the normal pattern of development

32

What is the normal range of hearing for children? Adult?

child: 0-15 db
adult: 0-25 db

33

Explain the between the sensorineural hearing loss and conductive hearing loss

Sensorineural occurs when there is damage cochlea and/or auditory nerve (inner ear)
Conductive occurs when there is a problem conducting sound waves anywhere along the route through the outer ear, tympanic membrane (eardrum), or middle ear (ossicles).

34

what is a well established factor in articulation learning?

age???

35

Tongue thrust refers to a certain manner of swallowing and tongue placement in the oral cavity during rest. T/F

T

36

What 3 things characterize tongue thrusts?

1. Tongue protruding between or against the upper and/or lower “front teeth” when forming /s/, /z/, /t/, /d/, /n/, /l/, or /sh/
2. Frequent open-mouth resting posture with the lips parted and/or the tongue resting against the upper and/or lower teeth
3. Frequent mouth breathing in the absence of allergies or nasal congestion

37

What age is considered normal for tongue thrusting

approximately up to 6 months