Rule 2 officials and their duties Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Rule 2 officials and their duties Deck (61):
1

AR 4 Team A is ahead by one point. The game ending horn sounds with the ball loose at the division line. Clearly after time has expired, A1 retrieves the ball and dunks into A1's basket. The referee, before checking/approving the final score, see this action by A1 and assess a player/sub technical foul. Team A's coach pushes the referee after the technical foul is called. The referee assesses a FF2 technical foul to team A's coach, ejects the coach and awards Team B four free throws.

The referee is correct. The officials' jurisdiction does not end until the approval of the final score. Until the officials' jurisdiction ends, an official may call a technical foul, correct a correctable error (Rule 2, Section 12), or correct a bookkeeping mistake by the official score

2

A.R. 5:

The officials leave the playing area at the end of the game, and while they are in the locker room, it is discovered that there is a mistake in the score or that there was a request for a correctable error (Rule 2, Section 12).

RULING: When the officials leave the visual confines of the playing court when the last period is over, the score has been approved and the game is over.

(Rule 2-4-4)

3

A.R. 6:

When an official is required to hand/bounce the ball to the thrower-in, is it the duty of the official to wait until both teams are ready before doing so?

RULING: No. The resumption-of-play procedure is in effect for the entire game, except to start the second half or any extra period. After the official has given the direction signal and other necessary information, teams are expected to be ready for all normal play situations. When the official inadvertently indicates the wrong team for a throw-in and discovers the error before the throw-in ends, the official should withhold the ball from play to permit the players to re-deploy themselves. The officials should not permit unusual delays during a throw-in.

(Rule 2-7-13 and Rule 4, Section 57)

4

A.R. 7:

B1 commits a fifth foul [any combination of personal and (Men) CLASS A technical fouls; (Women) all technical fouls], which results in two free throws for A1. The official scorer and official timer fail to notify any of the game officials that a fifth foul has been committed. When the scorers realize the mistake, they inform the official timer to sound the game-clock horn. The official timer sounds the device as the first of two free throws is made or missed. The referee asks the scorers' table personnel to explain the problem. The referee is advised that B1 has committed five fouls, after which the referee advises the coach and player of Team B that B1 has five fouls. The coach replaces B1.

RULING: Play shall be resumed with the second free throw by A1. There is no additional penalty assessed for the official scorer's and timer's mistake in failing to notify the officials of B1's fifth foul.

(Rule 2-9-4 and 3-4-2.b)

5

A.R. 8:

A player who has committed a fifth foul [any combination of personal fouls, (Men) CLASS A technical fouls and (Women) all technical fouls] continues to play because the scorers have failed to notify the officials.

RULING: As soon as the scorers discover the irregularity, they should sound the game-clock horn as soon as the ball is in control of the offending team or is dead. The disqualified player shall be removed immediately. Any points that may have been scored while such a player was illegally in the game shall count.

(Rule 2-9-4)

6

A.R. 9:

At halftime, the official scorer, who is a member of the home-team faculty, removes the scorebook from the scorers' table:

(1) Of his or her own volition; or

(2) At the request of the home-team coach.

RULING: (1) When the scorebook is not taken to the home team's locker room, there should be no penalty. When there is evidence that the official scorer removed the scorebook to take it to the home-team locker room, an administrative technical foul shall be assessed. This administrative technical foul does not count toward the team foul count.

(2) When the home-team coach instructs the official scorer to remove the scorebook, the head coach shall be assessed a (Women) direct or (Men) CLASS B technical foul.

(Rule 2-9-12, 10-2-4, 10-4-3 and 10-6-2.e)

7

A.R. 10:

When may a scorer signal?

RULING: When the scorer desires to call attention to a player who is illegally in the game, the scorer may signal the official when the ball is in control of that player’s team or when the ball becomes dead. When it is for a substitution, the scorer may signal when the next dead ball occurs or when the offending team has team control. When it is for conferring with an official, the scorer may signal when the ball is dead. When the scorer signals while the ball is live, the official shall ignore the signal when a scoring play is in progress. Otherwise, the official may signal for the game clock to be stopped to determine the reason for the signal.

(Rule 2-9-15 and 3-4-1.h)

8

A.R. 11:

The game-clock horn sounds while the ball is live.

RULING: Players should ignore the game-clock horn since it does not cause a dead ball. The officials shall use their judgment in blowing the ball dead to consult with the scorers and timers. When the players on both teams do not ignore the game-clock horn and stop playing, the officials shall stop play and award the ball to the team in control at a designated spot nearest to where the ball was when the stoppage occurred.

(Rule 2-9-15)

9

A.R. 12:

The official scorer fails to record two points awarded to Team A by an official during the first half as a result of basket interference by B2.

RULING: The scorer's mistake shall be rectified at any time until the referee approves the final score.

(Rule 2-9-17)

10

A.R. 13:

After two minutes of the first extra period, it is discovered that during the second half of regulation play, the official scorer failed to record one point as a result of a made free throw by Team A.

RULING: The score shall be recorded and play shall be continued at a designated spot from the point of interruption.

(Rule 2-9-17)

11

A.R. 14:

In a game with no official courtside television monitor, the red light or LED lights that signal the end of the last period cannot be seen nor can the game-clock horn be heard. The officials disagree whether the ball was in flight during a try for field goal or whether a foul occurred before time expired.

RULING: The final decision shall be made by the referee. The official timer shall indicate if the ball was in flight before the red light or LED lights signal was activated or before the game-clock horn sounded only when requested to do so by the referee. The referee shall use his or her best judgment; but when the evidence for counting or not counting the goal or foul is equal, the referee shall rule that the goal counts and that the foul shall be charged. In a game with an official courtside television monitor and a game clock with a 10th-of-a second display, the status of the try for goal and the committed foul shall be ascertained with the use of the courtside monitor.

(Rule 2-10-15.c, 2-13-3, 2-13-4, and 5-7-2)

12

A.R. 15:

A1 touches the ball that was thrown in by A2. The ball strikes the playing court and bounces until A3 gains control by dribbling. The shot-clock operator started the shot clock when A1 touched the ball.

RULING: The operator was correct. When play is resumed by a throw-in, the game clock and shot clock shall be started when the ball is legally touched by or touches a player on the playing court.

13

A.R. 16:

Player B1 deflects A1's pass toward the sideline. Player B2 chases the ball and while airborne and before landing out of bounds, throws the ball backward onto the playing court where it is recovered by Team A. The shot clock operator resets the shot clock. Is the shot clock operator correct?

RULING: Yes. The act of throwing the ball backwards and onto the court demonstrates team control by Team B. When Team A regains possession, the shot clock shall be reset.

(Rule 4-15-1 and 2-11-6.a)

14

A.R. 17:

With the alternating-possession arrow favoring Team A and 20 seconds remaining on the shot clock, A1's try for goal lodges between the backboard and the basket support.

RULING: Team A shall be awarded possession for a throw-in and the shot clock shall be reset.

(Rule 2-11-6.d)

15

A.R. 18:

A1 releases the ball on a try for goal, B1 partially blocks the shot and the ball:

(1) Hits the ring or flange; or

(2) Goes through the basket; or

(3) Goes out of bounds.

RULING: (1) and (2) The play is legal and the action shall continue.

(3) The official shall blow the whistle to stop play and the shot-clock operator shall stop but not reset the shot clock. On the ensuing throw-in by Team A, the game clock and shot clock shall start when the throw-in touches any player on the playing court.

(Rule 2-11-7.a)

16

A.R. 19:

Team A is in control of the ball when A1 and B1 commit a double personal foul, neither of which were flagrant fouls. While reporting the foul, the official assesses a technical foul against the coach of:

(1) Team A; or

(2) Team B.

RULING: Charge the fouls to A1 and B1, but no free throws are awarded. In (1) and (2), any player from the offended team shall attempt the two free throws for the technical foul. Play shall be resumed at the point of interruption, with the ball awarded to Team A, the team in control, at a designated spot nearest to where the ball was located when the double personal foul was committed.

(1) Since the technical foul was assessed to the coach of Team A, the team in control, the shot clock shall not be reset.

(2) Since the technical foul was assessed to the coach of Team B, the shot clock shall be reset.

(Rule 2-11-7.h, 2-11-6.b.2 and 10-1-16 Penalty f)

17

A.R. 20:

B1 pushes A1 during an unsuccessful try. A1 is awarded two free throws. The first free throw by A1 is successful, after which B2 takes the ball out of bounds under Team A's basket and passes to B3, who passes to B4 for an uncontested field goal in Team B's basket. The captain of Team A then calls to the attention of an official that A1 did not receive a second free throw.

RULING: The goal by B4 shall count. A1 shall be permitted to attempt the second free throw with no players lined up along the free-throw lane. The ball shall then be awarded to Team A out of bounds at the end line nearer Team B's basket and the thrower-in shall be permitted to run the end line. This was the point where the game was stopped to correct the error.

(Rule 2-12-1.a and 2-12-2)

18

A.R. 21:

After the bonus is in effect, B1 is penalized for holding A1. A1 erroneously is not awarded a free throw. A1 is awarded the ball out of bounds and completes the throw-in to A2. The coach of Team A notifies the official scorer that the coach wants to meet with the official concerning a correctable error. When Team A scores a field goal, the official scorer sounds the game-clock horn and advises the official of the coach's request for the conference. The official recognizes the correctable error after talking with the coach and official scorer.

RULING: The field goal by Team A shall count. This error is correctable because it happened within the prescribed time limit of Rule 2, Section 12. A1 shall be awarded his or her merited free throw(s) and play shall be resumed with a throw-in by Team B, who is entitled to run the end line.

(Rule 2-12-1.a, 2-12-5 and 2-12-2)

19

A.R. 22:

Before the bonus rule is in effect, B1 fouls A1. The official errs by awarding A1 a one-and-one attempt.

(1) A1 makes the first free-throw try, and the error is then discovered; or

(2) A1 is successful in both free throws and then the official detects the error; or

(3) A1 misses the front end of the one-and-one and the game clock starts, at which time the official detects the error; or

(4) A1 is successful in the first bonus attempt but misses the second free throw and, as a result, the game clock starts and B1 scores a field goal.

In each of the four situations, the error shall be called to the attention of the official before or during the first dead ball after the game clock has been properly started.

RULING: Each of the four situations is a correctable error.

(1), (2) and (3) Team A shall be awarded the ball at a designated spot nearest to where the foul occurred. The free throw(s) and activity during it, other than any technical foul or a flagrant 1 or 2 personal foul, shall be canceled. Any points scored, time consumed and additional activity that may occur before the recognition of the error, shall not be nullified.

(4) Team A shall be awarded the ball out of bounds at Team B's end line, which was the point of interruption, to correct the error. The free throw(s) and activity during it, other than any technical foul or a flagrant 1 or 2 personal foul, shall be canceled. Any points scored, time consumed and additional activity that may occur before the recognition of the error, shall not be nullified.

(Rule 2-12-1.b, 2-12-5 and 2-12-2)

20

A.R. 23:

B1 fouls A1 and it is Team B's ninth foul of the second half. The official erroneously awards A1 two free throws instead of a one-and-one. A1:

(1) Makes two free throws; or

(2) Misses the first free throw and makes the second free throw; or

(3) Misses both free throws.

Within the correctable-error time limitations, the officials shall be notified of their error.

RULING: (1) A1 was entitled to the second free throw because the first free throw was successful. Both free throws shall count, and play shall be resumed at the point of interruption, which is where play was stopped to correct the error.

21

A.R. 24:

A1 is fouled by B1 during a field-goal attempt and the try is successful. A2 erroneously is awarded the free throw. While A2's successful attempt is in the air:

(1) B3 fouls A3; or

(2) B3 commits a flagrant 1 personal foul against A3.

After the successful free throw by A2 and before the ball becomes live on the throw-in, the coach of Team B properly asks the referee to correct the error of awarding the free throw to the wrong player.

RULING: The free throw by A2 shall be canceled, and A1 shall properly attempt the free throw. The common foul by B3 in (1) shall be canceled. The flagrant 1 personal foul in (2) cannot be canceled. The error shall be corrected when A1 is given the free throw to which A1 was entitled as a result of the original foul. In (2), the game shall continue with the administration of the two free throws to A3 resulting from the flagrant 1 personal foul by B3. Team A shall be awarded the ball at the designated spot nearest to where the foul by B3 occurred.

(Rule 2-12-1.c and 2-12-5)

22

A.R. 25:

(1) A1 or (2) B1 is called for basket interference at Team A's basket. In (1), the referee erroneously counts the score or, in (2), erroneously fails to count the score. In each case, the error is discovered during the first dead ball after the game clock has started.

RULING: In (1) and (2), the official made a judgment that basket interference occurred. However, after the judgment was made, the official erred, in (1) by erroneously counting the score and in (2) by failing to count the goal. The official's error in (1) and (2) shall be correctable because the error was recognized within the proper time limit.

(Rule 2-12-1.e and 2-12-3)

23

A.R. 26:

Team A has the ball and is working for a shot. The shot-clock horn sounds and then A1 shoots and scores an apparent field goal. The shot-clock horn is not heard by the officials on the playing court. Play continues with Team B inbounding the ball. With 20 seconds remaining on the shot clock, the official calls traveling on B1. At that time, the official timer calls the referee to the scorers' table to explain that the shot clock had sounded before A1 scored the field goal.

RULING: Officials are permitted to use information from table officials to make corrections. Since it is within the correctable-error time frame, the error can be corrected. When it is determined, in the official's judgment, that the basket was scored after the shot-clock horn sounded, the goal shall be canceled. Since the clock was running in this case, the official has until the second live ball after the error to make the correction. The error shall be correctable until the ball is put in play after the traveling call.

(Rule 2-12-3, 2-12-1.e and 2-7-6)

24

A.R. 27:

B1 fouls A1 after the bonus is in effect. A1 is not awarded the bonus free throws. Team A is awarded the throw-in. Team A controls the ball inbounds, and A3 eventually asks for and receives a timeout. During the timeout, an official recognizes the correctable error or it is called to his/her attention that A1 should have been awarded a one-and-one free throw.

RULING: A1 shall be awarded the one-and-one and play shall be resumed as after any normal free throw. Points scored, time consumed and additional activity that may occur before the recognition of the error shall not be nullified.

(Rule 2-12-5 and 2-12-1.a)

25

A.R. 28:

Team B's coach appeals to an official for a correctable-error because he/she thinks a goal was erroneously counted. A school representative is sitting in the bleachers with a camcorder. May the official consult the camcorder?

RULING: No. A camcorder that is not at a courtside table is not an official courtside monitor; however, if the camcorder and all necessary equipment were on an official courtside table located within 12 feet of the playing court, the camcorder could be consulted.

(Rule 2-13-1)

26

A.R. 29:

In the same situation as in A.R. 28, a team manager is filming the team video from an elevated position. The official requests that the manager bring the tape to the scorers' table so that the official can play it in the videocassette player and television that are on the scorers' table. Is this legal?

RULING: No. The entire unit, including the tape, must be at a courtside table. When the tape had been filmed from the courtside table and the videocassette player and television were on that table, it would have been legal to consult the tape.

(Rule 2-13-1)

27

A.R. 30:

A1 releases a try for goal at the expiration of time for the game. The official observes a three-point field goal but inadvertently indicates the field goal to be a successful two-point goal. Before the official goes to a courtside monitor to confirm the status of the play, the coach from Team A appeals to an official for a correctable error on the grounds that the goal was counted erroneously and three points should have been awarded.

RULING: When there is a reading of zeros on the game clock and after making a call on the playing court, the officials shall be required to use the courtside monitor to ascertain whether the try for field goal was released before or after the reading of zeros when it is necessary to determine the outcome of the game. The officials may, but are not required to, use the courtside monitor to determine whether a try for goal was a two- or three-point attempt unless the coach makes an appeal for a correctable error. In such a case, the officials are now required to investigate, which may include using the monitor, whether a correctable error occurred. When the coach’s appeal is ruled to be incorrect, a 75-second timeout shall be charged or a 30-second timeout when a 75-second timeout is not available in games not involving the electronic-media timeout format. In games involving the electronic-media timeout format, either a 60- or 30-second timeout shall be charged to his or her team. When that timeout exceeds the allotted number, an administrative technical foul shall be assessed to the offending team.

(Rule 2-12-6, Rule 2-13-2.b.1 and .3, and 2-13-3.a.1)

28

A.R. 31:

As the official calls a five-second closely guarded violation, the official sounds the whistle and gives the signal to stop the game clock. The game clock was stopped, however, in the official's judgment, time elapsed after the signal to stop the clock.

RULING: The official is permitted to go to the official courtside monitor to determine if a timer's mistake has been committed. When it is determined that time did elapse, the official is permitted to correct the time.

(Rule 2-13-2.c.1.c)

29

A.R. 32:

A1's successful try for goal ties the score with two seconds remaining on the game clock. The timer fails to properly stop the game clock.

RULING: The official is permitted to use the monitor to obtain information of the timer's mistake when in his or her judgment, time has elapsed. The mistake shall be corrected before the start of the intermission for the extra period.

(Rule 2-13-2.c.1.c and 2-13-2.c.1.b)

30

A.R. 33:

There are 37 seconds (Men) or 32 seconds (Women) on the game clock and 35 seconds (Men) or 30 seconds (Women) on the shot clock. Team A uses time before A1 releases the ball for a try for goal. After A1 releases the ball, the shot-clock horn sounds. The ball does not strike the ring or flange. The officials call a shot-clock violation. At the same time as the official's whistle, the game clock sounds, signaling that the period has ended. Shall the official put two seconds back on the game clock?

RULING: No. The shot-clock horn sounded at the expiration of the shot-clock period; however, this does not stop play unless recognized by the official's whistle. The official's whistle for the shot-clock violation stopped play. The expiration of playing time was indicated by the timer's signal. This signal shall terminate player activity (Rule 2-10-14). The period ended with the violation. However, in games with a 10th-of-a-second game clock display and an official courtside monitor, when in the judgment of the official time has elapsed from when he or she signaled for the clock to be stopped to when the game clock stopped, the monitor may be used to determine the correct time to be put back on the game clock. In games without an official courtside monitor, the official is required to have definite information relative to the time involved to correct the time elapsed.

(Rule 2-13-2.c.1.c, 4-64, 2-10-14, 2-11-9, 5-10-1.c, 5-10-2.a and 6-5-1.d)

31

A.R. 34:

Team A begins a throw-in with 20 seconds remaining in the game and two seconds remaining on the shot clock. The throw-in is completed and A2 releases a try for goal. The try is successful and the game clock erroneously continues to run. The officials recognize the timer's mistake and stop play. During this stoppage in play, the officials decide that they will use the monitor to correct the timer's mistake and to determine if the shot was released before the sounding of the shot-clock horn since the horn could not be heard above the crowd noise.

RULING: The officials are permitted to use the monitor to correct the timer's mistake. The officials are not permitted to use the monitor to determine if the shot was released before the sounding of the shot-clock horn in this play. The only time the monitor can be used to determine whether a shot-clock violation occurred is when there are zeros on the clock. Officials are permitted to use the monitor to determine whether the shot clock failed to properly start, stop, set or reset, or that the shot clock malfunctioned. However, when it is determined that there was no timing mistake or malfunction with the shot clock, officials cannot use the monitor to determine if the shot was released before the sounding of the shot-clock horn just because they could not hear the horn.

(Rule 2-13-2.c.1, 2-13-3.a.2 and 2-13-5.d)

32

A.R. 35:

With zeros on the game clock, A1 is fouled in the act of shooting and then after the foul, A1 releases the ball for a try for goal. A1's try is:

(1) Successful; or

(2) Unsuccessful.

RULING: When a foul and a try for goal sequentially occur at the expiration of time, the official shall use the monitor to determine whether the foul and the try occurred before the reading of zeros on the game clock.

(1) When it is determined that the foul occurred before the reading of zeros on the game clock but the try was not released before the reading of zeros, the foul shall be penalized. With the use of the monitor, the official shall be permitted to put the exact time on the game clock as to when the foul occurred. When the officials determine that time should be put back on the game clock, the game has not ended and the goal shall count. When the time of the foul cannot be determined, the official shall be permitted to put the exact time back on the game clock when it can be determined as to when the ball passed through the net. When it is determined with the use of the monitor that both the foul and the try occurred before the reading of zeros on the game clock, the foul shall be penalized and the goal shall count.

(2) Since the try was unsuccessful, the official shall use the monitor to determine whether the foul occurred before the reading of zeros on the game clock. When it is determined that the foul occurred before the reading of zeros, the foul shall be penalized. When it can be determined, the officials shall be permitted to put back on the game clock the exact time as to when the foul occurred.

(Rule 2-13-3.a.1 and 2-13-3.a.3)

33

A.R. 36:

In a game with an official courtside monitor, A1 attempts a try with 15 seconds remaining on the shot clock. The try did not contact the ring or flange and Team A regained control. However, the shot-clock operator reset the shot clock.

(1) The official blows the whistle and confers with his/her partners, and they determine that the ball did not hit the ring and the shot clock was mistakenly reset. The officials have definite information relative to the time that was on the shot clock when it was reset. As a result, the officials decide not to use the courtside monitor.

(2) The official blows the whistle and confers with his/her partners and they are unable to determine whether the shot clock was improperly reset. The referee decides to go to the monitor to determine whether a timing mistake occurred.

Are the officials required to use the courtside monitor in these situations?

RULING: (1) No. The officials are not required to use the monitor since they agree that the ball did not hit the ring. Since the officials had definite information relative to the time that was on the shot clock before it was mistakenly reset, they shall instruct the shot-clock operator to place the correct time on the shot clock and play shall be resumed at the point of interruption.

34

A.R. 37:

Player A1 falls to the playing floor and is:

(1) Bleeding; or

(2) Doubled over in pain, holding his/her abdomen. Is the official permitted to use the monitor to determine if the conditions were a result of a fight?

RULING: It is required for the official to use the monitor to determine if a fight occurred and who participated. In using the monitor, when the official ascertains that an opponent struck a player with the arms (elbows), hands, legs or feet, and if the official concludes that the act was combative and occurred within the prescribed time frame, then he/she shall deem it a fight. Consequently, the player shall be ejected and the fighting penalty invoked.

(Rule 2-13.3.b, 2-13.2.d.2 and Rule 4, Section 26)

35

A.R. 38:

The game clock is stopped because of a violation by Team A when A1 commits a flagrant 2 foul against B1:

(1) Before the ball is placed at Team B2's disposal for a throw-in; or

(2) After the ball is placed at Team B2's disposal for a throw-in.

The officials fail to observe the flagrant 2 personal foul. When B2 completed the throw-in to B3, the clock was properly started, then B3 committed a traveling violation. During the dead ball period created by B3's traveling violation, the referee notices that B1 is bleeding. The officials go to the monitor to determine if a flagrant 2 personal foul occurred.

RULING: The officials were correct in using the monitor to determine if a flagrant 2 foul occurred. This foul shall be penalized because the flagrant 2 foul was recognized by the officials during the first dead ball after the foul.

In (1), the foul occurred when the game clock was STOPPED and the ball was DEAD because the ball had not yet been placed at the disposal of Team B for the throw-in. When it is determined that a flagrant 2 technical foul occurred, A1 shall be assessed a flagrant 2 technical foul and ejected. The foul counts toward the team foul total. Two free throws shall be awarded to any member of the offended team. Play shall resume by awarding the ball to Team B for a throw-in (Men) at a designated spot at the division line on either side of the playing court (Women) at the point of interruption, which was where play was stopped to review the monitor for the flagrant 2 technical foul.

When it was deemed that the flagrant 2 technical foul did not occur, a contact dead ball technical foul may be assessed to A1. In such a case, two free throws are awarded to the offended player (B1) and play shall resume (Men) at the division line and (Women) where the play was stopped to review the act with a throw-in to the offended team.

In (2), the foul occurred when the game clock was STOPPED and the ball was LIVE because it was at Team B's disposal for a throw-in. When it is determined that a flagrant 2 personal foul occurred, A1 shall be assessed a flagrant 2 personal foul and ejected. The foul counts toward the team foul total. Two free throws shall be awarded to the offended player (B1). Play shall be resumed by awarding the ball to the offended team where the play was stopped to review the flagrant 2 personal foul.

When it was deemed that the flagrant 2 personal foul did not occur, a flagrant 1 personal foul may be assessed to A1. In such a case, two free throws are awarded to the offended player (B1) and play shall resume where the play was stopped to review the act with a throw-in to the offended team.

When the act was not deemed to be a fight, a flagrant 1 or 2 foul, or the act occurred outside the statute of limitations, no penalty shall be assessed, and play shall be resumed where the play was stopped to review the act.

(Rule 2-13-2.d.1 and .2; 7-5-7 Exception)

36

A.R. 39:

Team A is in control of the ball in its front court with the game clock running. B1 intercepts a pass and advances the ball up court. Behind the play, A2 commits a flagrant 2 personal foul against B2. The officials fail to observe the act. B1 scores a field goal and Team A makes a throw-in from the end of the court where the goal was made. After the throw-in:

(1) A1 commits a violation; or

(2) A1 successfully scores a goal.

Immediately after the dead ball caused by the violation or successful score, the referee notices that B2 is bleeding and stops play. The officials decide to use the monitor to determine if a fight caused the bleeding.

RULING: The officials were correct to use the monitor to determine if a fight occurred. Upon review of the play, it is determined that a fight did occur. Since the fight occurred while the game clock was running, the statute of limitation to penalize the fight is before the second live ball after the fight occurred.

In (1), A2 committed a flagrant 2 personal against B2 while the clock was running. After the foul, B1's successful field goal created the first dead ball as the ball became dead immediately after the score while the clock continued to run. Thereafter, the first live ball was created when the ball was at the disposal of Team A for a throw-in. When the throw-in was completed and A1 committed a violation, the second dead ball was created. Before the ball became live on the subsequent throw-in, the officials reviewed the play and observed the fight.

In (2), A2 committed a flagrant 2 personal against B2 while the clock was running. After the foul, B1's successful field goal created the first dead ball as the ball became dead immediately after the score while the clock continued to run. The first live ball was then created when the ball was at the disposal of Team A for a throw-in. The second dead ball occurred immediately after A1's successful goal. Before the ball became live on the subsequent throw-in, the officials stopped play, reviewed the play and observed the fight.

In both cases, the fight was observed before the second live ball after the fight so the fight shall be penalized. Player A2 shall be assessed a flagrant 2 personal foul, charged with fighting, ejected and is subject to suspension. The foul counts toward the team foul total. Two free throws shall be awarded to the offended player (B2) and play shall resume where the play was stopped to review the act with a throw-in to the offended team.

When it is determined that the foul was not a fight but a flagrant 2 act, a flagrant 2 personal foul may be assessed. This foul counts toward the team foul total. In such a case, two free throws shall be awarded to the offended player (B2) and play shall be resumed where the play was stopped to review the act. Player A2 shall be ejected but is not subject to suspension.

When it is determined that the foul was not a fight or a flagrant 2 personal foul, a flagrant 1 personal foul may be assessed to A2. In such a case, two free throws are awarded to the offended player (B2) and play shall resume where the play was stopped to review the act with a throw-in to the offended team.

When the act was not deemed to be a fight, or a flagrant 2 personal foul, or a flagrant 1 personal foul or the act occurred outside the statute of limitations, no penalty shall be assessed, and play shall be resumed where the play was stopped to review the act.

(Rule 2-13-2.d.1 and .2)

37

A.R. 40:

An official reports a flagrant 1 personal foul on A1 because of illegal elbow contact above the shoulders of B1. Team B coach asks the officials to review the foul using the monitor to determine if the foul was a flagrant 2 personal foul. The official reviews the monitor to see if a flagrant 2 personal foul occurred on the play and upon review sees that the illegal contact was actually made below the shoulders. Is the official permitted to change the reported flagrant 1 personal foul to a common foul? Is Team B charged with a timeout because a flagrant 2 personal foul did not occur?

RULING: While the officials are permitted to review the monitor to see if a flagrant 2 personal foul or (Women) a flagrant 1 personal foul for illegal elbow contact above the shoulders of an opponent occurred, Rule 2-13-2.d.1 states that when it is determined that a flagrant 2 personal foul did not occur but a flagrant 1 personal or a contact dead ball technical foul did occur, those fouls can be penalized, but no other infractions may be penalized. When the official reports a flagrant 1 personal foul, that foul can be reviewed until the ball becomes live, but when it is discovered that neither a flagrant 1 nor flagrant 2 foul occurred, the reported foul cannot be downgraded to a common foul. Since the coach requested a review for a possible flagrant 2 personal foul and no such foul occurred, Team B is charged a timeout.

(RULING: 2-13.2.d.1)

38

A.R. 41:

Team B commits a violation and while the ball is dead and the clock is stopped, A2 commits a flagrant 2 technical foul against B2. The officials fail to observe the act. Team A completes the throw-in and commits a violation. After the violation by Team A, Team B completes a throw-in and while the ball is in control of Team B, the officials see that B2 is injured and stop play. Because the officials have a plausible reason to believe that a flagrant 2 foul may have occurred, they choose to review the severity of the foul using the courtside monitor.

RULING: When the officials fail to observe the flagrant act, the monitor may be used to review the act.

After the flagrant 2 technical foul by A2, the ball became live when the ball was at the disposal of Team A (first live ball). After Team A completed the throw-in, they committed a violation, creating the first dead ball after the foul. After this violation, the second live ball occurred when the ball was at the disposal of Team B for a throw-in. Team B completed this throw-in then play was stopped to review the play. Upon review of the play, the officials observed the flagrant 2 technical foul by A2. However, the statute of limitations had expired when the ball became live for the second time after the foul and therefore the act shall not be penalized. Play shall be resumed where play was stopped to review the play.

(Rule 2-13-2.d.1 and .2)

39

A.R. 42:

During a live ball, the officials fail to observe the illegal contact of A1's excessive swinging elbow above the shoulders of defender B1 on a play under Team A's basket. Play continues to the opposite end of the court where:

(1) A held ball occurs; or

(2) B2 is fouled on a successful goal.

RULING: The officials may use the monitor to determine if a flagrant 2 personal foul occurred. When the officials discover that A1's elbow illegally contacted B1 above the shoulders and they are within the time frame to penalize this foul, they shall assess A1 with a flagrant 2 personal foul and A1 shall be ejected. Since the review of the foul occurred during the first dead ball period following the illegal contact by A1, the officials are within the legal time frame to penalize this flagrant 2 personal foul. B1 will shoot two free throws for the flagrant 2 personal foul charged to A1 with no players on the marked lane spaces. Following these free throws:

(1) Play will be resumed with a throw-in to Team B for the flagrant 2 personal foul at a designated spot nearest to where the held ball occurred (the point of interruption). The throw-in is for the flagrant 2 personal foul and not an alternating-possession throw-in so the alternating-possession arrow will not be reversed when the throw-in ends.

(2) B2 is awarded one free throw with no players in the marked lane spaces. Following this free throw, play will be resumed with a throw-in to Team B for the flagrant 2 personal foul under Team B's basket, which is the point of interruption.

(Rule 2-13-2.d.2)

40

A.R. 43:

During a live ball, officials fail to observe the illegal contact of A1's elbow above the shoulders of defender B1 on a play under Team A's basket. Play continues to the opposite end of the court where a flagrant 1 personal foul is called against B2 for illegally contacting A2 above the shoulders with her elbow. After the official reports the foul on B2, the Team B coach informs an official that B1 is bleeding because B1 was flagrantly fouled by A1. The official chooses to review the monitor to determine if a flagrant 2 personal foul occurred when they were not looking.

RULING: The officials may use the monitor to determine if a flagrant 2 personal foul or (Women) a flagrant 1 personal foul for illegal elbow contact above the shoulders of the opponent occurred against B1 when they were not looking. When the officials determine that this illegal contact by A1 is not a flagrant 2 personal foul, but is a flagrant 1 personal foul and they are within the time frame to penalize this foul, the officials may assess a flagrant 1 personal foul. Since the review of the foul occurred during the first dead ball period following the illegal contact by A1, they are within the legal time frame to penalize this foul. Player B1 will shoot two free throws for the flagrant 1 personal foul charged to A1 with no players on the marked lane spaces. Following these free throws, Player A2 will shoot two free throws with no players in the marked lane spaces for the flagrant 1 personal foul charged to B2. Play is resumed with a throw-in under Team B's basket to the team entitled to the alternating-possession arrow. This is where play was stopped to review the monitor, making it the point of interruption.

(2-13-2.d.2)

41

A.R. 44:

The official reports a flagrant 2 foul on A1. After reporting the foul, the officials decide to use the monitor to determine if another flagrant 2 personal or flagrant 2 contact technical foul occurred. The officials do not see another flagrant 2 foul, but would like to downgrade the foul against A1 to a flagrant 1 personal foul. Are the officials permitted to downgrade a foul that has been reported?

RULING: Yes. This foul can be downgraded to only a flagrant 1 personal foul or a contact dead ball technical. When the officials reported the foul as a flagrant 2 foul on A1, that foul can be reviewed until the ball becomes live. When officials are not sure if a flagrant 2 personal or flagrant 2 contact technical foul occurred, they are permitted to use the monitor to make this determination.

(Rule 2-13-2.d.1)

42

A.R. 45:

The official calls a personal foul on B1. During the dead ball period after this foul call, B1 contacts A1 and the official assesses a contact dead ball technical. While the officials are discussing penalty administration, they fail to observe B5 committing a flagrant 2 foul against A5. The officials, not realizing that a flagrant 2 technical foul has occurred, award Team A two free throws for the technical foul against B1. Before the throw-in by Team A for the personal foul, the coach from Team A informs the officials that B5 committed a flagrant 2 foul against A5. At this time, the officials choose to use the monitor to:

(1) Review the original personal and contact dead ball technical foul to determine if either of them was a flagrant 2 foul; or

(2) Determine if a flagrant 2 technical foul occurred when they were not looking.

Are the officials correct to use the monitor?

RULING: (1) No. When the ball was placed at the disposal of the free-thrower to shoot the free throws for the contact dead ball technical foul against B1, the ball became live. When the ball became live, the period to review the personal and technical fouls has ended.

RULING: (1) No. When the ball was placed at the disposal of the free-thrower to shoot the free throws for the contact dead ball technical foul against B1, the ball became live. When the ball became live, the period to review the personal and technical fouls has ended.

(Rule 2-13-2.d.1.a)

(2) Yes. The officials MAY use the monitor to determine if a flagrant 2 contact technical foul occurred. Using the replay equipment, the officials reviewed the game until they discovered that B5 committed a flagrant 2 contact technical foul against A5. This foul occurred when the clock was stopped while the officials assessed the personal and contact dead ball technical foul to B1. Since B5's flagrant 2 contact technical foul against A5 occurred when the clock was stopped, the officials have until the first dead ball after the clock was properly started to penalize the act. In this play, the clock has not started since B5's flagrant 2 act; therefore, the flagrant 2 contact technical foul by B5 shall be penalized. Player B5 shall be ejected. Team A shall be awarded two free throws for the flagrant technical foul by B5 and awarded the ball for a throw-in (Men) at the division line (Women) at the point of interruption, which was the spot nearest to where the personal foul by B1 occurred.

(Rule 2-13-2.d.1 and .2.a)

43

A.R. 46:

A1 is called for a traveling violation. Before resuming play with a throw-in, the official notices that B3's face is bleeding. The official decides to use the monitor to determine if a flagrant 2 foul or (Women) a flagrant 1 personal for illegal elbow contact above the shoulders of an opponent had been committed against B3.

Is the official correct?

RULING: The official is permitted to use the courtside monitor since it is plausible that a flagrant 2 foul or (Women) a flagrant 1 personal for illegal elbow contact above the shoulders of an opponent may have occurred. In reviewing the play on the monitor, the official ascertained that a flagrant 2 personal foul occurred during a live ball and while the clock was running. The officials deemed the foul to be a fight since it was a confrontational/combative act by A3. The official shall eject A3 for fighting, notify the coach, report the fight to the scorer, penalize the flagrant 2 personal foul by awarding two free throws to B3 and resume play by awarding the ball to Team B at a designated spot nearest to where play was stopped to review the foul.

(Rule 2-13-2.d.1 and .2.b)

44

A.R. 29:

In the same situation as in A.R. 28, a team manager is filming the team video from an elevated position. The official requests that the manager bring the tape to the scorers' table so that the official can play it in the videocassette player and television that are on the scorers' table. Is this legal?

RULING: No. The entire unit, including the tape, must be at a courtside table. When the tape had been filmed from the courtside table and the videocassette player and television were on that table, it would have been legal to consult the tape.

(Rule 2-13-1)

45

A.R. 30:

A1 releases a try for goal at the expiration of time for the game. The official observes a three-point field goal but inadvertently indicates the field goal to be a successful two-point goal. Before the official goes to a courtside monitor to confirm the status of the play, the coach from Team A appeals to an official for a correctable error on the grounds that the goal was counted erroneously and three points should have been awarded.

RULING: When there is a reading of zeros on the game clock and after making a call on the playing court, the officials shall be required to use the courtside monitor to ascertain whether the try for field goal was released before or after the reading of zeros when it is necessary to determine the outcome of the game. The officials may, but are not required to, use the courtside monitor to determine whether a try for goal was a two- or three-point attempt unless the coach makes an appeal for a correctable error. In such a case, the officials are now required to investigate, which may include using the monitor, whether a correctable error occurred. When the coach’s appeal is ruled to be incorrect, a 75-second timeout shall be charged or a 30-second timeout when a 75-second timeout is not available in games not involving the electronic-media timeout format. In games involving the electronic-media timeout format, either a 60- or 30-second timeout shall be charged to his or her team. When that timeout exceeds the allotted number, an administrative technical foul shall be assessed to the offending team.

(Rule 2-12-6, Rule 2-13-2.b.1 and .3, and 2-13-3.a.1)

46

A.R. 31:

As the official calls a five-second closely guarded violation, the official sounds the whistle and gives the signal to stop the game clock. The game clock was stopped, however, in the official's judgment, time elapsed after the signal to stop the clock.

RULING: The official is permitted to go to the official courtside monitor to determine if a timer's mistake has been committed. When it is determined that time did elapse, the official is permitted to correct the time.

(Rule 2-13-2.c.1.c)

47

A.R. 32:

A1's successful try for goal ties the score with two seconds remaining on the game clock. The timer fails to properly stop the game clock.

RULING: The official is permitted to use the monitor to obtain information of the timer's mistake when in his or her judgment, time has elapsed. The mistake shall be corrected before the start of the intermission for the extra period.

(Rule 2-13-2.c.1.c and 2-13-2.c.1.b)

48

A.R. 33:

There are 37 seconds (Men) or 32 seconds (Women) on the game clock and 35 seconds (Men) or 30 seconds (Women) on the shot clock. Team A uses time before A1 releases the ball for a try for goal. After A1 releases the ball, the shot-clock horn sounds. The ball does not strike the ring or flange. The officials call a shot-clock violation. At the same time as the official's whistle, the game clock sounds, signaling that the period has ended. Shall the official put two seconds back on the game clock?

RULING: No. The shot-clock horn sounded at the expiration of the shot-clock period; however, this does not stop play unless recognized by the official's whistle. The official's whistle for the shot-clock violation stopped play. The expiration of playing time was indicated by the timer's signal. This signal shall terminate player activity (Rule 2-10-14). The period ended with the violation. However, in games with a 10th-of-a-second game clock display and an official courtside monitor, when in the judgment of the official time has elapsed from when he or she signaled for the clock to be stopped to when the game clock stopped, the monitor may be used to determine the correct time to be put back on the game clock. In games without an official courtside monitor, the official is required to have definite information relative to the time involved to correct the time elapsed.

(Rule 2-13-2.c.1.c, 4-64, 2-10-14, 2-11-9, 5-10-1.c, 5-10-2.a and 6-5-1.d)

49

A.R. 34:

Team A begins a throw-in with 20 seconds remaining in the game and two seconds remaining on the shot clock. The throw-in is completed and A2 releases a try for goal. The try is successful and the game clock erroneously continues to run. The officials recognize the timer's mistake and stop play. During this stoppage in play, the officials decide that they will use the monitor to correct the timer's mistake and to determine if the shot was released before the sounding of the shot-clock horn since the horn could not be heard above the crowd noise.

RULING: The officials are permitted to use the monitor to correct the timer's mistake. The officials are not permitted to use the monitor to determine if the shot was released before the sounding of the shot-clock horn in this play. The only time the monitor can be used to determine whether a shot-clock violation occurred is when there are zeros on the clock. Officials are permitted to use the monitor to determine whether the shot clock failed to properly start, stop, set or reset, or that the shot clock malfunctioned. However, when it is determined that there was no timing mistake or malfunction with the shot clock, officials cannot use the monitor to determine if the shot was released before the sounding of the shot-clock horn just because they could not hear the horn.

(Rule 2-13-2.c.1, 2-13-3.a.2 and 2-13-5.d)

50

A.R. 35:

With zeros on the game clock, A1 is fouled in the act of shooting and then after the foul, A1 releases the ball for a try for goal. A1's try is:

(1) Successful; or

(2) Unsuccessful.

RULING: When a foul and a try for goal sequentially occur at the expiration of time, the official shall use the monitor to determine whether the foul and the try occurred before the reading of zeros on the game clock.

(1) When it is determined that the foul occurred before the reading of zeros on the game clock but the try was not released before the reading of zeros, the foul shall be penalized. With the use of the monitor, the official shall be permitted to put the exact time on the game clock as to when the foul occurred. When the officials determine that time should be put back on the game clock, the game has not ended and the goal shall count. When the time of the foul cannot be determined, the official shall be permitted to put the exact time back on the game clock when it can be determined as to when the ball passed through the net. When it is determined with the use of the monitor that both the foul and the try occurred before the reading of zeros on the game clock, the foul shall be penalized and the goal shall count.

(2) Since the try was unsuccessful, the official shall use the monitor to determine whether the foul occurred before the reading of zeros on the game clock. When it is determined that the foul occurred before the reading of zeros, the foul shall be penalized. When it can be determined, the officials shall be permitted to put back on the game clock the exact time as to when the foul occurred.

(Rule 2-13-3.a.1 and 2-13-3.a.3)

51

A.R. 36:

In a game with an official courtside monitor, A1 attempts a try with 15 seconds remaining on the shot clock. The try did not contact the ring or flange and Team A regained control. However, the shot-clock operator reset the shot clock.

(1) The official blows the whistle and confers with his/her partners, and they determine that the ball did not hit the ring and the shot clock was mistakenly reset. The officials have definite information relative to the time that was on the shot clock when it was reset. As a result, the officials decide not to use the courtside monitor.

(2) The official blows the whistle and confers with his/her partners and they are unable to determine whether the shot clock was improperly reset. The referee decides to go to the monitor to determine whether a timing mistake occurred.

Are the officials required to use the courtside monitor in these situations?

RULING: (1) No. The officials are not required to use the monitor since they agree that the ball did not hit the ring. Since the officials had definite information relative to the time that was on the shot clock before it was mistakenly reset, they shall instruct the shot-clock operator to place the correct time on the shot clock and play shall be resumed at the point of interruption.

52

A.R. 37:

Player A1 falls to the playing floor and is:

(1) Bleeding; or

(2) Doubled over in pain, holding his/her abdomen. Is the official permitted to use the monitor to determine if the conditions were a result of a fight?

RULING: It is required for the official to use the monitor to determine if a fight occurred and who participated. In using the monitor, when the official ascertains that an opponent struck a player with the arms (elbows), hands, legs or feet, and if the official concludes that the act was combative and occurred within the prescribed time frame, then he/she shall deem it a fight. Consequently, the player shall be ejected and the fighting penalty invoked.

(Rule 2-13.3.b, 2-13.2.d.2 and Rule 4, Section 26)

53

A.R. 38:

The game clock is stopped because of a violation by Team A when A1 commits a flagrant 2 foul against B1:

(1) Before the ball is placed at Team B2's disposal for a throw-in; or

(2) After the ball is placed at Team B2's disposal for a throw-in.

The officials fail to observe the flagrant 2 personal foul. When B2 completed the throw-in to B3, the clock was properly started, then B3 committed a traveling violation. During the dead ball period created by B3's traveling violation, the referee notices that B1 is bleeding. The officials go to the monitor to determine if a flagrant 2 personal foul occurred.

RULING: The officials were correct in using the monitor to determine if a flagrant 2 foul occurred. This foul shall be penalized because the flagrant 2 foul was recognized by the officials during the first dead ball after the foul.

In (1), the foul occurred when the game clock was STOPPED and the ball was DEAD because the ball had not yet been placed at the disposal of Team B for the throw-in. When it is determined that a flagrant 2 technical foul occurred, A1 shall be assessed a flagrant 2 technical foul and ejected. The foul counts toward the team foul total. Two free throws shall be awarded to any member of the offended team. Play shall resume by awarding the ball to Team B for a throw-in (Men) at a designated spot at the division line on either side of the playing court (Women) at the point of interruption, which was where play was stopped to review the monitor for the flagrant 2 technical foul.

When it was deemed that the flagrant 2 technical foul did not occur, a contact dead ball technical foul may be assessed to A1. In such a case, two free throws are awarded to the offended player (B1) and play shall resume (Men) at the division line and (Women) where the play was stopped to review the act with a throw-in to the offended team.

In (2), the foul occurred when the game clock was STOPPED and the ball was LIVE because it was at Team B's disposal for a throw-in. When it is determined that a flagrant 2 personal foul occurred, A1 shall be assessed a flagrant 2 personal foul and ejected. The foul counts toward the team foul total. Two free throws shall be awarded to the offended player (B1). Play shall be resumed by awarding the ball to the offended team where the play was stopped to review the flagrant 2 personal foul.

When it was deemed that the flagrant 2 personal foul did not occur, a flagrant 1 personal foul may be assessed to A1. In such a case, two free throws are awarded to the offended player (B1) and play shall resume where the play was stopped to review the act with a throw-in to the offended team.

When the act was not deemed to be a fight, a flagrant 1 or 2 foul, or the act occurred outside the statute of limitations, no penalty shall be assessed, and play shall be resumed where the play was stopped to review the act.

(Rule 2-13-2.d.1 and .2; 7-5-7 Exception)

54

A.R. 39:

Team A is in control of the ball in its front court with the game clock running. B1 intercepts a pass and advances the ball up court. Behind the play, A2 commits a flagrant 2 personal foul against B2. The officials fail to observe the act. B1 scores a field goal and Team A makes a throw-in from the end of the court where the goal was made. After the throw-in:

(1) A1 commits a violation; or

(2) A1 successfully scores a goal.

Immediately after the dead ball caused by the violation or successful score, the referee notices that B2 is bleeding and stops play. The officials decide to use the monitor to determine if a fight caused the bleeding.

RULING: The officials were correct to use the monitor to determine if a fight occurred. Upon review of the play, it is determined that a fight did occur. Since the fight occurred while the game clock was running, the statute of limitation to penalize the fight is before the second live ball after the fight occurred.

In (1), A2 committed a flagrant 2 personal against B2 while the clock was running. After the foul, B1's successful field goal created the first dead ball as the ball became dead immediately after the score while the clock continued to run. Thereafter, the first live ball was created when the ball was at the disposal of Team A for a throw-in. When the throw-in was completed and A1 committed a violation, the second dead ball was created. Before the ball became live on the subsequent throw-in, the officials reviewed the play and observed the fight.

In (2), A2 committed a flagrant 2 personal against B2 while the clock was running. After the foul, B1's successful field goal created the first dead ball as the ball became dead immediately after the score while the clock continued to run. The first live ball was then created when the ball was at the disposal of Team A for a throw-in. The second dead ball occurred immediately after A1's successful goal. Before the ball became live on the subsequent throw-in, the officials stopped play, reviewed the play and observed the fight.

In both cases, the fight was observed before the second live ball after the fight so the fight shall be penalized. Player A2 shall be assessed a flagrant 2 personal foul, charged with fighting, ejected and is subject to suspension. The foul counts toward the team foul total. Two free throws shall be awarded to the offended player (B2) and play shall resume where the play was stopped to review the act with a throw-in to the offended team.

When it is determined that the foul was not a fight but a flagrant 2 act, a flagrant 2 personal foul may be assessed. This foul counts toward the team foul total. In such a case, two free throws shall be awarded to the offended player (B2) and play shall be resumed where the play was stopped to review the act. Player A2 shall be ejected but is not subject to suspension.

When it is determined that the foul was not a fight or a flagrant 2 personal foul, a flagrant 1 personal foul may be assessed to A2. In such a case, two free throws are awarded to the offended player (B2) and play shall resume where the play was stopped to review the act with a throw-in to the offended team.

When the act was not deemed to be a fight, or a flagrant 2 personal foul, or a flagrant 1 personal foul or the act occurred outside the statute of limitations, no penalty shall be assessed, and play shall be resumed where the play was stopped to review the act.

(Rule 2-13-2.d.1 and .2)

55

A.R. 40:

An official reports a flagrant 1 personal foul on A1 because of illegal elbow contact above the shoulders of B1. Team B coach asks the officials to review the foul using the monitor to determine if the foul was a flagrant 2 personal foul. The official reviews the monitor to see if a flagrant 2 personal foul occurred on the play and upon review sees that the illegal contact was actually made below the shoulders. Is the official permitted to change the reported flagrant 1 personal foul to a common foul? Is Team B charged with a timeout because a flagrant 2 personal foul did not occur?

RULING: While the officials are permitted to review the monitor to see if a flagrant 2 personal foul or (Women) a flagrant 1 personal foul for illegal elbow contact above the shoulders of an opponent occurred, Rule 2-13-2.d.1 states that when it is determined that a flagrant 2 personal foul did not occur but a flagrant 1 personal or a contact dead ball technical foul did occur, those fouls can be penalized, but no other infractions may be penalized. When the official reports a flagrant 1 personal foul, that foul can be reviewed until the ball becomes live, but when it is discovered that neither a flagrant 1 nor flagrant 2 foul occurred, the reported foul cannot be downgraded to a common foul. Since the coach requested a review for a possible flagrant 2 personal foul and no such foul occurred, Team B is charged a timeout.

(RULING: 2-13.2.d.1)

56

A.R. 41:

Team B commits a violation and while the ball is dead and the clock is stopped, A2 commits a flagrant 2 technical foul against B2. The officials fail to observe the act. Team A completes the throw-in and commits a violation. After the violation by Team A, Team B completes a throw-in and while the ball is in control of Team B, the officials see that B2 is injured and stop play. Because the officials have a plausible reason to believe that a flagrant 2 foul may have occurred, they choose to review the severity of the foul using the courtside monitor.

RULING: When the officials fail to observe the flagrant act, the monitor may be used to review the act.

After the flagrant 2 technical foul by A2, the ball became live when the ball was at the disposal of Team A (first live ball). After Team A completed the throw-in, they committed a violation, creating the first dead ball after the foul. After this violation, the second live ball occurred when the ball was at the disposal of Team B for a throw-in. Team B completed this throw-in then play was stopped to review the play. Upon review of the play, the officials observed the flagrant 2 technical foul by A2. However, the statute of limitations had expired when the ball became live for the second time after the foul and therefore the act shall not be penalized. Play shall be resumed where play was stopped to review the play.

(Rule 2-13-2.d.1 and .2)

57

A.R. 42:

During a live ball, the officials fail to observe the illegal contact of A1's excessive swinging elbow above the shoulders of defender B1 on a play under Team A's basket. Play continues to the opposite end of the court where:

(1) A held ball occurs; or

(2) B2 is fouled on a successful goal.

RULING: The officials may use the monitor to determine if a flagrant 2 personal foul occurred. When the officials discover that A1's elbow illegally contacted B1 above the shoulders and they are within the time frame to penalize this foul, they shall assess A1 with a flagrant 2 personal foul and A1 shall be ejected. Since the review of the foul occurred during the first dead ball period following the illegal contact by A1, the officials are within the legal time frame to penalize this flagrant 2 personal foul. B1 will shoot two free throws for the flagrant 2 personal foul charged to A1 with no players on the marked lane spaces. Following these free throws:

(1) Play will be resumed with a throw-in to Team B for the flagrant 2 personal foul at a designated spot nearest to where the held ball occurred (the point of interruption). The throw-in is for the flagrant 2 personal foul and not an alternating-possession throw-in so the alternating-possession arrow will not be reversed when the throw-in ends.

(2) B2 is awarded one free throw with no players in the marked lane spaces. Following this free throw, play will be resumed with a throw-in to Team B for the flagrant 2 personal foul under Team B's basket, which is the point of interruption.

(Rule 2-13-2.d.2)

58

A.R. 43:

During a live ball, officials fail to observe the illegal contact of A1's elbow above the shoulders of defender B1 on a play under Team A's basket. Play continues to the opposite end of the court where a flagrant 1 personal foul is called against B2 for illegally contacting A2 above the shoulders with her elbow. After the official reports the foul on B2, the Team B coach informs an official that B1 is bleeding because B1 was flagrantly fouled by A1. The official chooses to review the monitor to determine if a flagrant 2 personal foul occurred when they were not looking.

RULING: The officials may use the monitor to determine if a flagrant 2 personal foul or (Women) a flagrant 1 personal foul for illegal elbow contact above the shoulders of the opponent occurred against B1 when they were not looking. When the officials determine that this illegal contact by A1 is not a flagrant 2 personal foul, but is a flagrant 1 personal foul and they are within the time frame to penalize this foul, the officials may assess a flagrant 1 personal foul. Since the review of the foul occurred during the first dead ball period following the illegal contact by A1, they are within the legal time frame to penalize this foul. Player B1 will shoot two free throws for the flagrant 1 personal foul charged to A1 with no players on the marked lane spaces. Following these free throws, Player A2 will shoot two free throws with no players in the marked lane spaces for the flagrant 1 personal foul charged to B2. Play is resumed with a throw-in under Team B's basket to the team entitled to the alternating-possession arrow. This is where play was stopped to review the monitor, making it the point of interruption.

(2-13-2.d.2)

59

A.R. 44:

The official reports a flagrant 2 foul on A1. After reporting the foul, the officials decide to use the monitor to determine if another flagrant 2 personal or flagrant 2 contact technical foul occurred. The officials do not see another flagrant 2 foul, but would like to downgrade the foul against A1 to a flagrant 1 personal foul. Are the officials permitted to downgrade a foul that has been reported?

RULING: Yes. This foul can be downgraded to only a flagrant 1 personal foul or a contact dead ball technical. When the officials reported the foul as a flagrant 2 foul on A1, that foul can be reviewed until the ball becomes live. When officials are not sure if a flagrant 2 personal or flagrant 2 contact technical foul occurred, they are permitted to use the monitor to make this determination.

(Rule 2-13-2.d.1)

60

A.R. 45:

The official calls a personal foul on B1. During the dead ball period after this foul call, B1 contacts A1 and the official assesses a contact dead ball technical. While the officials are discussing penalty administration, they fail to observe B5 committing a flagrant 2 foul against A5. The officials, not realizing that a flagrant 2 technical foul has occurred, award Team A two free throws for the technical foul against B1. Before the throw-in by Team A for the personal foul, the coach from Team A informs the officials that B5 committed a flagrant 2 foul against A5. At this time, the officials choose to use the monitor to:

(1) Review the original personal and contact dead ball technical foul to determine if either of them was a flagrant 2 foul; or

(2) Determine if a flagrant 2 technical foul occurred when they were not looking.

Are the officials correct to use the monitor?

RULING: (1) No. When the ball was placed at the disposal of the free-thrower to shoot the free throws for the contact dead ball technical foul against B1, the ball became live. When the ball became live, the period to review the personal and technical fouls has ended.

RULING: (1) No. When the ball was placed at the disposal of the free-thrower to shoot the free throws for the contact dead ball technical foul against B1, the ball became live. When the ball became live, the period to review the personal and technical fouls has ended.

(Rule 2-13-2.d.1.a)

(2) Yes. The officials MAY use the monitor to determine if a flagrant 2 contact technical foul occurred. Using the replay equipment, the officials reviewed the game until they discovered that B5 committed a flagrant 2 contact technical foul against A5. This foul occurred when the clock was stopped while the officials assessed the personal and contact dead ball technical foul to B1. Since B5's flagrant 2 contact technical foul against A5 occurred when the clock was stopped, the officials have until the first dead ball after the clock was properly started to penalize the act. In this play, the clock has not started since B5's flagrant 2 act; therefore, the flagrant 2 contact technical foul by B5 shall be penalized. Player B5 shall be ejected. Team A shall be awarded two free throws for the flagrant technical foul by B5 and awarded the ball for a throw-in (Men) at the division line (Women) at the point of interruption, which was the spot nearest to where the personal foul by B1 occurred.

(Rule 2-13-2.d.1 and .2.a)

61

A.R. 46:

A1 is called for a traveling violation. Before resuming play with a throw-in, the official notices that B3's face is bleeding. The official decides to use the monitor to determine if a flagrant 2 foul or (Women) a flagrant 1 personal for illegal elbow contact above the shoulders of an opponent had been committed against B3.

Is the official correct?

RULING: The official is permitted to use the courtside monitor since it is plausible that a flagrant 2 foul or (Women) a flagrant 1 personal for illegal elbow contact above the shoulders of an opponent may have occurred. In reviewing the play on the monitor, the official ascertained that a flagrant 2 personal foul occurred during a live ball and while the clock was running. The officials deemed the foul to be a fight since it was a confrontational/combative act by A3. The official shall eject A3 for fighting, notify the coach, report the fight to the scorer, penalize the flagrant 2 personal foul by awarding two free throws to B3 and resume play by awarding the ball to Team B at a designated spot nearest to where play was stopped to review the foul.

(Rule 2-13-2.d.1 and .2.b)