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Flashcards in Section 3-A Deck (37)
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1
Q

Employees reporting to more than 1 supervisor.

A

1-The employee plays the supervisors against each other so none know exactly what the employee is doing, and the employee gets away with doing little or no work.
2-The supervisor who yells the loudest or bangs the hardest on the desk is the one who gets the employee to do work and the other bosses get no work done.
3-The employee becomes frustrated attempting to follow conflicting orders from different supervisors and gives up trying
4-The project or task itself tends to suffer in quality because the employee may execute the task poorly trying to follow conflicting procedures.

2
Q

The Unity of Command thus channels…

A

….direction and accountability for a company member to one company officer.

3
Q

Span of Control is

A

…the limit one person can effectively manage. A rule of thumb for the fire service is hat an officer can effectively supervise five to six individuals.

4
Q

Factors that affect the number of people being supervised

A

1-The ability and experience of the officer
2-The ability and experience of the firefighters
3-The nature of the task
4-The relationship of task being performed by one individual tot he tasks being performed by other individuals
5-The stability and competence of the organization.

5
Q

When an officer feels the span of control has been exceeded, he/she must…

A

….delegate authority to other people.

6
Q

Definition of IC

A

The person who assumes overall command and control of personnel and apparatus at the emergency incident. He/she assumes the role Commander and Manager, operating at the strategic level.

7
Q

The strategic level or strategy is the…

A

….management of the offensive/defensive decision by the IC.

-This decision regulates operational control, establishes objectives, sets priorities and allocates resources

8
Q

Tactical level

A

Handled by the sector officers under the command of the IC. They have been assigned to specific areas and tasks, which are designed to meet the operational objectives.

9
Q

An effective operation centres around on IC. If there is no command or multiple commanders then operations break down in many areas.

A

1-Action-A single commander to structure action around a tactical set of guidelines that all FFs follow
2-Command and Control-IC to show strong early and visible command, when taking control of an operation and effectively mobilizing the team,
3-Coordination-All ask coordinated through the IC to get max. productivity from all available resources working together
4-Planning-IC has to combine an effective pre-lan, with reconnaissance and info processing on the fire ground to develop and update one plan
5-Organization-IC must develop the plan and establish the roles and functions for everyone
6-Communications-IC use SOP to support communications and allow info to flow at all levels
7-Safety-IC uses a safety policy to command, manage and direct and control the positions and functions of all crews at the scene

10
Q

Incident Commander

A

The role of the IC is one of a “professional” manager and commander. The term “professional” refers to training, dedication and desire to perform to the best of one’s abilities and composure.

11
Q

Roles of an IC

A
  • to direct all operations and is done by choosing command over action and working from a strategic level rather than a task level.
  • to move toward the correct action
  • to operate in a clinically calm manner by looking and acting professional at all times.
12
Q

Responsibilities of an IC.

A
  • must protect, remove and provide care for endangered citizens
  • must provide for firefighting safety and survival
  • must stop the fire
  • Conserve property during and after fire control operations.
13
Q

The only way an incident commander can properly carry out his/her function is to be well trained in:

A
  • Decision making
  • Command and Control
  • Review and Evaluation
14
Q

Decision Making

A
  • Distinguish between assumption and fact
  • Sometime info is not factual so we need to act on assumption and fact
  • Maintain a flexible approach to decision. (IC can update at anytime during the operation through the use of feedback from his officers)
  • develop a -standard response to report on viewed conditions. (Basic facts and observations are required to go along with initial decisions. By applying standard response the IC can avoid making premature decisions)
  • Shift tot he management role after initiating action. (Use efficiency of command by delegating tactical responsibility)
15
Q

Command and Control

A
  • Apply flexible control levels
  • Be able to order “what & where” without having to worry about or to decide “how”
  • They don’t want to play around with too many details however they feel a few extra minutes at the start of the incident may save hours in the course of the operation
  • They select an approach command area and stay there
  • They analyze a situation in clinical terms and they refuse to be distracted
  • They rely on regular updating from officers back to the command area.
  • They practice the art of “selective democracy” they decide when to “call for a vote” and not to, keeping in mind their “vote” outweighs for all
  • They develop realistic expectations for all
  • They place their people in the best spots in order to get the most from them
  • They build a command support structure. They work with and respect the strengthening effect given to them by their officers. Through support and cooperation they eliminate the “lets put it out before the Chief arrives & screws it up” syndrome
16
Q

Command and Control

A
  • Apply flexible control levels
  • Be able to order “what & where” without having to worry about or to decide “how”
  • They don’t want to play around with too many details however they feel a few extra minutes at the start of the incident may save hours in the course of the operation
  • They select an approach command area and stay there
  • They analyze a situation in clinical terms and they refuse to be distracted
  • They rely on regular updating from officers back to the command area.
  • They practice the art of “selective democracy” they decide when to “call for a vote” and not to, keeping in mind their “vote” outweighs for all
  • They develop realistic expectations for all
  • They place their people in the best spots in order to get the most from them
  • They build a command support structure. They work with and respect the strengthening effect given to them by their officers. Through support and cooperation they eliminate the “lets put it out before the Chief arrives & screws it up” syndrome
17
Q

To have effective command and control the IC must consider four areas of management:

A

1-Stress management
2-“Lone Ranger” Management
3-Midpoint Management
4-Scarce Resource Management

18
Q

Stress Management

A
  • Delegate and reduce the number of subordinates you are dealing with.
  • Makes for easier control, reduces stress placed on you.
  • Reduces stress on officers by limiting responsibility to assigned tasks.
19
Q

Lone Ranger Management

A
  • You must be ready to act as a single commander

- You must delegate and allow your officers to operate at their highest level.

20
Q

Midpoint Management

A

You have to be prepared to inherit ongoing scenarios.

21
Q

Scarce Resource Management

A

You must keep abreast of resources available initially and if you do not have enough be aware of what has to be done to obtain what you want and where to get it.

22
Q

To be effective and successful the IC has to show the following fire ground etiquette.

A
  • Be a leader and be supportive of the group
  • Respect the personnel by being sensitive and working as a team
  • Don’t take advantage of rank, authority or seniority. Everyone does their share and helps each other.
  • Eliminate multiple standards. Don’t play favourites or try to get even
  • Don’t waste time with “fire ground hobbies” Every situation will not suit the same tactic
  • Extend a reasonable deference to rank and seniority and respect the people running the show
  • Use proper language. Be professional and use language and courtesy that is appropriate for the public record.
23
Q

The need for central command.

A

Without strong, central command the typical fire scene quickly deteriorates into an unsafe, out of control situation.

24
Q

Operating on the fire ground without central command usually produces

A

1-No command at all —-Everyone operates on the free enterprise system with no commitment to central authority
2-Multiple competitive command —–The fire ground becomes quickly occupied by several highly mobile command officers, each with a different plan and each wanting a piece of the action. They generally circle the fire giving conflicting orders to everyone they encounter.

25
Q

Assumption of Command

A

Under normal circumstances the first officer on scene assumes position of IC. They remain in this position until relieved by a more senior officer. Assumption of command by the first officer is mandatory however in certain circumstances it may be necessary for the first in officer to pass command quickly to the next arriving officer.

26
Q

When the first off cir arrives with a company, they must quickly decide which of the following commitments they should make:

A

1-Nothing Showing - requires investigation of the first vehicle while other vehicles stage - the officer will escort their crew to investigate )becoming mobile command)
2-Fast attack - Requires immediate action to stabilize (Concludes with 1 of the following 1-Situation Stabilized by offensive attack lead by first officer 2-Command transferred to second officer 3-Sitation not stabilized, first officer moves to exterior and stationary command position)

27
Q

The only time and IC gives up the advantage of stationary command is when….

A

….he realizes his participation is required for the attack and safety of his crew.

28
Q

Situations for passing command

A

1-when a commanding officer is arriving seconds behind the first company
2-when the initial arriving officer is faced with an urgent rescue, a critical tactical situation or a particularly dangerous risk to personnel and feels that his personal involvement is absolutely required

29
Q

The Confirmation of Command done by…

A

1-Broadcasting to all inits the unit designation, arrival, assumption of command and the name and location of command as well as the fire ground frequency being used.

30
Q

Those arriving at an incident with an IC in place will fall under one of these three categories.

A

1-Working under the IC in place
2-Taking command if passed by the first commander
3-Assuming command from the IC by virtue of higher rank.

31
Q

Command Positioning

A
  • in conspicuous and predictable location
  • a good view of the area involved
  • if possible it should be in an area which affords the IC view of 3 sides of the building or a view which allows max. effectiveness
  • in an area that does not impede apparatus movement.
32
Q

Sector

A

is a smaller, more manageable unit of fire ground command.

33
Q

Strategy

A

Operated by the IC, involving the activities necessary for overall operational control, establishing objectives, setting priorities and allowing resources. This takes advantage of the stationary position of the command post.

34
Q

Tactical Level

A

Operated by Sector Officers, assigned to specific areas and tasks by the IC in order to meet operational objectives

35
Q

Task Level

A

Operated by fire companies, involving the evolution - oriented functions needed to produce task level outcomes.

36
Q

Sectors are assigned based on the following factors

A

1-Early fire stage overload - when the number of companies coming in exceed the commander’s capabilities to manage
2-Major operation predication - they must be able to anticipate “early” if an incident will become major. keep ahead
3-Isolated tactical positions - when fire companies are in areas that the commander cannot control
4-Dangerous conditions - Close control must be kept over companies operating in dangerous areas.

37
Q

Sectors are assigned based on the following factors

A

1-Early fire stage overload - when the number of companies coming in exceed the commanders capabilities
2-Major operation prediction - they must be able to anticipate “early” if an incident will become major. Keep ahead
3-Isolated tactical positions - when fire companies are in areas that the commander cannot control
4-Dangerous conditions - close control must be kept over companies operating in dangerous area.