Station 1 Flashcards Preview

CAM201: Anat/Histo Prac 3 > Station 1 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Station 1 Deck (25):
1

Which bones form the boundaries of the anterior opening of the nasal cavity?

Inferiorly: Palatine process of maxilla
Superiorly: Nasal Bone

2

What are the functions of the turbinates and meatuses?

Collectively, the arrangement of the turbinates and meatuses serve to provide lamiar flow of air through the nasal cavity, and to increase surface area of the respiratory epithelium.

The largest (inferior) turbinate is responsible for most of the directing of flow, heating and humidification of inspired air before it progresses into the naso-, oro-, and laryngopharynx, to the trachea.

Functions:
Directing flow
Heating air
Humidifying air
Trapping inhaled particles in mucous of respiratory epithelium (immunological)
Provide the humidification needed to keep the delicate olfactory epithelium healthy

3

What are the two bones that form the most of the skeleton of the nasal septum

Vomer and Perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone. (the rest of the septum is completed, anteriorly, by cartilage)

PUT PICTURE IN HERE

4

What bone forms most of the roof of the nasal cavity? What goes through the small foramina in the roof?

Ethmoid Bone.

Olfactory Nerves pass through the Olfactory Foramina in the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone

5

What are the two bones of the hard palate? What is the functional significance of the hard palate?

Palatine Process of the Maxilla

Horizontal Plate of the Palatine Bone

It separates the nasal and oral cavities

6

Which bones make up the lateral wall of the nasal cavity?

Maxilla, Palatine, Ethmoid (as sup and mid turbinates), the Inferior Turbinate (independent bone), the Lacrimal bone, Nasal bone

7

List the bones that form the margins of the choanae

Choanae = opening into the nasopharynx from the nasal cavity

Anteriorly/Inferiorly: Horizontal plate of the palatine bone

Superiorly/Posteriorly by the Sphenoid

8

Which bones contain the paranasal sinuses?

Frontal (frontal sinus), Ethmoid (Ethmoid Air Cells), Sphenoid (Sphenoid Sinus), Maxilla (Maxillary Sinus).

9

Where do each of the air sinuses open into the nasal cavity?

Sphenoid opens onto the sphenoethmoidal recess posteriorly to the superior turbinate

Frontal opens via the nasofrontal duct into the semilunar hiatus of the middle meatus

Maxillary sinus into the semilunar hiatus of the middle meatus

Ethmoid air cells open into the middle and superior meatus






10

Where do tears from the eye enter the nasal cavity?

Via the nasolacrimal duct, onto the inferior meatus

11

What is the problem with the maxilalry sinus' drainage?

The opening of the maxillary sinus at the superior end of the sinus, thus does not drain well in the upright position. Drains bettwe when lying on one side.
E.g. lying on left side drains the right maxillary sinus

12

Things to recognise on the foetal head

Tongue, Mouth, Developing teeth, eyes, hard palate, nasal cavity, nasal septum, brain

13

What type of epithelium lines the majority of the nasal cavity?

Respiratory epithelium.

Pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium with mucous secreting goblet cells. Other cells present include granule cells (endocrine functions), brush cells (chemo- and general sensory), and basal cells (stem cells)

14

Function of paranasal air sinuses?

Debatable.

Theories include:
Reducing weight of facial bones,
Increasing vocal resonance,
Reducing blunt pressure during blows to the face,
Increasing surface area available to humidify inspired air (due to slow turnover of air in this region),
Immunological function

15

What type of epithelium lines paranasal sinuses?

Respiratory Epithelium

16

What might happen to an individual that suffers an allergic reaction involving the nasal cavity and sinuses?

As the paranasal sinuses are continuities of the nasal cavity, they may become blocked with mucous if the there is an allergic reaction within the nasal cavity, or if the nasal cavity becomes swollen (e.g. due to a cold). This is because the draining of the sinuses become impaired.

In severe cases this can lead to sinitis.

Painful 'pressure' pain may be felt within the sinuses from the build up of high presser mucous when it cannot drain

17

Which bones contain the paranasal sinuses?

Frontal (frontal sinus), Ethmoid (Ethmoid Air Cells), Sphenoid (Sphenoid Sinus), Maxilla (Maxillary Sinus).

18

Where do each of the air sinuses open into the nasal cavity?

Sphenoid opens onto the sphenoethmoidal recess posteriorly to the superior turbinate

Frontal opens via the nasofrontal duct into the semilunar hiatus of the middle meatus

Maxillary sinus into the semilunar hiatus of the middle meatus

Ethmoid air cells open into the middle and superior meatus






19

Where do tears from the eye enter the nasal cavity?

Via the nasolacrimal duct, onto the inferior meatus

20

What is the problem with the maxilalry sinus' drainage?

The opening of the maxillary sinus at the superior end of the sinus, thus does not drain well in the upright position. Drains bettwe when lying on one side.
E.g. lying on left side drains the right maxillary sinus

21

Things to recognise on the foetal head

Tongue, Mouth, Developing teeth, eyes, hard palate, nasal cavity, nasal septum, brain

22

What type of epithelium lines the majority of the nasal cavity?

Respiratory epithelium.

Pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium with mucous secreting goblet cells. Other cells present include granule cells (endocrine functions), brush cells (chemo- and general sensory), and basal cells (stem cells)

23

Function of paranasal air sinuses?

Debatable.

Theories include:
Reducing weight of facial bones,
Increasing vocal resonance,
Reducing blunt pressure during blows to the face,
Increasing surface area available to humidify inspired air (due to slow turnover of air in this region),
Immunological function

24

What type of epithelium lines paranasal sinuses?

Respiratory Epithelium

25

What might happen to an individual that suffers an allergic reaction involving the nasal cavity and sinuses?

As the paranasal sinuses are continuities of the nasal cavity, they may become blocked with mucous if the there is an allergic reaction within the nasal cavity, or if the nasal cavity becomes swollen (e.g. due to a cold). This is because the draining of the sinuses become impaired.

In severe cases this can lead to sinitis.

Painful 'pressure' pain may be felt within the sinuses from the build up of high presser mucous when it cannot drain