Tears, Idle Tears Flashcards Preview

iGCSE English lit - Poetry > Tears, Idle Tears > Flashcards

Flashcards in Tears, Idle Tears Deck (20)
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1
Q

Tears Idle Tears

A

Alfred Lord Tennyson 1847

2
Q

Alfred Lord Tennyson 1809-1892

A

Greatly affect by the death of his good friend Arthur Hallam who died of a stroke aged 22, named his son Hallam Tennyson
Other notable works: Charging of the light brigade and In Memoriam written for Arthur Hallam

3
Q

Genre / Themes

A

An elegy

Loss and Longing

4
Q

Form

A

Blank verse, four quatrains, iambic meter built around the repetition of a refrain line

5
Q

The refrain line

A

The various kinds of repetition in the poem, help to convey the idea of the speaker trapped by, or obsessively focusing on the days that are no more

6
Q

“Tears, idle tears”

A

Unprompted, unbidden, without apparent purpose
The speaker questions why he should be moved to tears as he contemplates a ‘happy’ scene: confused by his seemingly unprompted tears

7
Q

“I know not what they mean”

A

The Speaker’s state of confusion

8
Q

“Depth of some divine despair”

A

Sense of powerful overwhelming emotions conveyed by the alliterations and the connotations of ‘depth’ (strength) and ‘divine’ (powerful, deeply felt and unknowable)

9
Q

“Happy Autumn-fields”

A

Happy because of the annotations with harvest and the bustling human activity and company (from which the speaker is detached, and an onlooker)
Autumn is a season of change pointing towards winter and the ideas of closure and death

10
Q

Stanza 2

A

The metaphor of sunrise and sunset, and of a voyage and of the seas
This is a very common 19th century metaphor for loss and grief

11
Q
"Fresh ...
...
Sad.. 
...
So sad, so fresh the   days that are no more"
A

The repetition intensifies the speakers sense grief

“The days that are no more” strike the speaker as being fresh and sad, he explains these sensations in this stanza

12
Q

“Ah” beginning of the third stanza

A

Emotions have escaped the speaker

13
Q

“Dark summer dawns”

A

A rather paradoxical image which further hints at the speakers depressed state; the conflict between the ideas of ‘dawn’ and the symbolism of the ‘darkness’
Proves there is no consolation to be found in nature and it only further promotes his grief

14
Q

“Half-awakened birds”

A

Another idea of struggle and uncertainty

15
Q

“The casement slowly grows a glimmering square”

A

Idea of a struggle; slow audacious transitions from darkness to faint ‘glimmering’ light. Light is a symbolism to reflect the speaker’s state of mind and also represents the faint traces of the past/memories which now feel lost to the speaker

16
Q

“Dear” start of final stanza

A

Deep intimacy

17
Q

“Deep as love, Deep as first love”

A

Repetition and the development of the idea of the strength of the sensation and of the awareness of loss

18
Q

“Wild with all regret”

A

Unconsolable and absolute

19
Q

“O Death in Life”

A

Emotional outcry

“Death in Life” torturous condition

20
Q

Final stanza

A

The speaker has moved from idly contemplating the source their feelings to recognising fully their powerful hold over him