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English 2016 > Terminology > Flashcards

Flashcards in Terminology Deck (12):
1

Body language

The facial expressions and positioning of a person that provide non-verbal clues about their mood and attitude

2

Intention

What is the cartoonist trying to achieve? Is the cartoon meant to amuse, make a political statement or ridicule a statesman? What emotion does the cartoonist want the reeder to feel

3

Irony

Irony is the difference between the ways things are and the way things should be, or the way things are expected to be. When one thing is said but something else is meant

4

Parody

An imitation of a piece of writing used to ridicule the original or create a satirical point

5

Satire

Satire uses humour to make a serious point. It involves using wit, irony or sarcasm to expose or highlight human vices or follies. Political cartoons often involve satire to make a serious point about the economy, politics or politicians.

6

Stereotype

An exaggerated, preconceived generalisation about the typical behaviour, attitudes, dress, etc. of various types of people

7

Verbal clues

Some parts of the drawing may be labelled or specific dialogue may be used to help the reader establish what the cartoon is about

8

Visual metaphor

In a metaphor, two different things are compared. In a visual metaphor, a picture stands for or represents something else.

9

Symbolism

Cartoonists use simple objects, or symbols, to stand for larger concepts or ideas. Think about what the cartoonist intends each symbol to stand for

10

Exaggeration

Sometimes cartoonist overdo, or exaggerate the physical characteristics of people or things in order to make a point. When you study a cartoon, look for any characteristics that seem to be overdone or overblown.( facial characteristics and clothing are some of the most commonly exaggerated characteristics.)

11

Analogy

An analogy is a comparison between two unlike things that share some characteristics. By comparing a complex issue or situation with a more familiar one, cartoonists can help their readers see it in a different light.

12

How do you analyse a political cartoon

- what issue is this political cartoon about?
- what is the cartoonist's opinion on this issue?
- what other opinion can you imagine another person having on this issue?
- did you find the cartoon persuasive? Why or why not?
- what other techniques could the cartoonist have used to make this cartoon more persuasive?