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Flashcards in trauma from occlusion Deck (37):
1

what is primary occlusal trauma?

Excessive force (e.g.: “high restoration”) to NORMAL periodontium

2

what is secondary occlusal trauma?

Normal (or excessive forces) Applied to a weakened periodontium

3

what is "fremitus"?

palpable vibrations or movement of a tooth, usually due to excessive contact with another tooth.

4

what are the 2 types of mobility caused by "teeth moving teeth"?

Fremitus and functional mobility

5

what is pathogenic migration? what causes

tooth displacement that results when the balance among the factors that maintain physiologic tooth position is disturbed by periodontal disease

6

T/F: pathogenic migration is a sign of unstable periodontium

true

7

what are the Possible Radiographic signs of occlusal trauma?

• Some may be due to extension of inflammatory periodontal disease without occlusal trauma as a factor

• Widened PDL Space and/or Thickened Rad. Lamina Dura

8

hypofunction and hyperfunction can both occur in ____________ bone

trabecular bone

9

________ of trabecular bone is a result of a lack of occlusal forces

hypofunction

10

T/F: angular bone loss & furcations have been a proven result of occlusal trauma

FALSE

May purely be due to tooth and bony anatomy and the progression of inflammatory periodontal disease

11

what is the Co-Destruction theory?

Occlusal trauma may be a co-destructive factor that alters the severity and pattern of inflammatory periodontal disease

12

T/F: occlusal trauma can allow periodontal disease to find a way into the PDL

true

13

what theory claims that: Occlusal trauma has no role in the severity and pattern of inflammatory periodontal disease progression

Advancing Plaque Front Theory

14

In trauma from occlusion, crushing of tooth against bone causes injury to the periodontal ligament at what sites?

at sites of pressure and tension

(can cause tipping of the tooth)

15

T/F: tipping of a tooth due to occlusal forces can result in inflammation

true

the necrosis of the PDL when pulled apart can cause inflammation

16

an injury from TFO without periodontitis results in what?

Injury results in acute (not plaque associated) inflammation

17

in TFO without periodontitis, PDL collagen fibers are destroyed ________

subcrestally

18

T/F: attachment loss is seen in a majority of TFO cases without periodontitis

FALSE

no perio- no attachment loss

19

how do teeth adapt to TFO without periodontitis?

increased mobility, widened PDL Space

20

T/F: in patients with only TFO (no periodontal issues), occlusal therapy may diminish the signs of occlusal trauma

true

21

what types of occlusal therapy can be used to reduce Traumatic occlusal forces?

• Re-contour high filling to resolve problem

• Splint teeth together to reduce force

• Bite planes

22

what causes secondary occlusal trauma?

normal occlusal forces are placed on teeth with compromised periodontal attachment

23

T/F: occlusal trauma and periodontitis can occur on the same tooth, but can be completely independent of one another

true

its the "No co-destruction" type

24

what happens when you have Jiggling type occlusal forces with periodontitis?

inflammatory infiltrate occupied by occlusal trauma lesion.

25

before you can address the issues associated with traumatic occlusal forces, you must take care of any existing __________

periodontitis

26

what happens due to the Downgrowth of junctional epithelium during TFO?

Enhanced loss of connective tissue

27

if periodontitis merges with increased tooth mobility (due to TFO), you will have _____________

co-destruction

28

Downgrowth (apical migration) of pocket epithelium, and enhanced (accelerated) attachment loss are both characteristics of what condition?

Co-destruction

(combination of perio and TFO)

29

T/F: If TFO and inflammatory periodontitis are separate (independent) processes, there will be enhanced attachment loss

FALSE

there will be no enhancement of attachment loss

30

what are the reversible treatments for TFO?

Night Guard (bite plane)

Extracoronal Splints

Muscle relaxants (medications)

Muscle exercises

31

what are the irreversible treatments for TFO?

Intracoronal splints

Occlusal adjustment by selective grinding

Orthodontics

Orthognathic surgery

32

what are the indications for selective occlusal grinding?

1) Periodontal Occlusal Trauma
2) Post-orthodontics
3) use prior to extensive treatments
4) Certain types of TMD
5) Certain wear patterns

33

when would you NOT want to use occlusal adjustment?

Severe malocclusion

Non-ideal but tolerated occlusion

Severe wear

Patient in pain

If no suitable end point

34

T/F: No TMO repair can occur unless inflammatory periodontal disease is first resolved

true

35

Occlusal trauma superimposed on an existing periodontitis may under certain conditions accelerate _____________

attachment loss

36

when is Occlusal therapy in conjunction with periodontal treatment indicated?

when occlusal trauma is present

37

Occlusal therapy is especially indicated prior to what?

periodontal regenerative therapy