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Flashcards in Vital Bleaching Deck (28):
1

How long does it take tetracycline stains to whiten?

3-6 months or longer

2

How long does it take blue/gray stains to whiten?

2-6 weeks (twice as long as yellow/brown)

3

How long does it take nicotine stains to whiten?

1-3 months

4

How long does it take yellow/brown stains to whiten?

1-3 weeks

5

This can cause yellow to dark brown staining, and can cross the placental barrier (avoid during pregnancy)

Tetracycline (look at photo)

6

This can cause blue-gray appearance of teeth, palate, or anterior mucosa

Minocycline Hydrochloride

7

This can cause gray brown discoloration
This can cause yellow discoloration

Chlortetracyline
Oxytetracycline

8

What is the main ingredient of vital bleaching?

Carbamide Peroxide

9

What is carbamide peroxide made of?

Hydrogen Peroxide + Urea

10

Roughly how much of CP converts to HP?

1/3

11

How long is HP active for?

30-60 mins (used less because of it)

12

How long is CP active for?

It releases 50% in the first ___ hours but continues to release for ___ hours longer

2-10 hours (used more because active longer than HP)

2 hours, 6 hours

13

What is the only ADA approved formula for vital bleaching?

Why is it good?

Downside?

10% carbamide peroxide

Lower concentration = less sensitivity

Takes longer to whiten well

14

How does CP work?

How does HP work?

Diffuses through enamel and dentin, breaks down into HP and urea

HP oxidizes organic pigments in tooth structures by breaking them down into small constituents that reflect less light

15

If composite restorations are planned, should you whiten before or after the restoration is placed?

Why?

Whiten before, restorations don't lighten

16

How long should you wait after bleaching before placing composite

Why?

Two weeks

Residual peroxide may affect bond strengths

17

What is a big disadvantage of OTC whitening kits?

No dental examination prior to bleaching

18

Opalescence go has 10% HP, how much is this in CP

30%

19

Why is dentist supervision preferred for whitening?

More viscous, potent gels
Better fitting trays
And management of these primary adverse effects

***Adverse effects are generally tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation.

20

What percent of patients experience sensitivity during in office bleaching?

100%

21

When making a custom tray, how far should the resin be from the gingival margin?

How long should the blockout be cured?

1mm

20-40 seconds

22

When heating the tray material, how far should it sag?

1-2 inches

23

When trimming the tray fabrication with scissors, scallop interproximally (can be scalloped or non scalloped, with or without reservoir).

Trimming 0.5mm beyond the CEJ has what effect?

Trimming 0.5 mm below the CEJ has what effect?

Beyond - increased retention

Below - decreased gingival irritation

24

What type of tray is most comfortable for the patient?

Non-scalloped and without reservoir

Provides a better seal against gingiva - less leakage and material required

25

Why does HP (like in opalescence go) cause tooth sensitivity?

What is another reason it occurs?

low molecular weight, can easily diffuse through enamel and dentin

Dehydration

26

What should immediately be used when there is sensitivity?

Then what modifications to the bleaching should be made

3% potassium nitrate desensitizing gel

Lower concentration and/or frequency

27

How does opaluster work?

What is it useful for?

enamel microabrasion, followed by fluoride treatment

Isolated shallow brown/white discolorations

28

Macroabrasion is done via what mechanism?

Finishing burs and polishing removes localized white spots