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Flashcards in Wildland/prevention Deck (60):
1

Briefing checklist

Situation
Mission/execution
Communications
Service/support
Risk management
Questions or concerns?

2

First three standard firefighting orders

-Keep informed on fire weather conditions and forecast
-Know what your fire is doing at all times
-Base all actions on current and expected behavior of the fire

3

Second three standard firefighting orders

-Identify escape routes and safety zones and make them known
-Post lookouts when there is possible danger
-Be alert keep calm think clearly act decisively

4

Last four standard firefighting orders

-Maintain prompt communications with your forces, your supervisor, and a joining forces
-Give clear instructions and be sure they are understood
-Maintain control of your forces at all times
-Fight fire aggressively having provided for safety first

5

Five communication responsibilities

-Brief others as needed
-DBrief your actions
-Communicate hazards to others
-Acknowledge messages
-Ask if you don't know

6

Leaders intent

-Task = what is to be done
-Purpose = why it is to be done
-End state = how it should look when done

7

Human factor barriers to situation awareness

-Low experience level with local factors
-Distraction from primary task
-Fatigue
-Stress reactions
-Hazardous attitude

8

After action review guidelines

-An AAR is performed as immediately after the event as possible
-The leaders role is to ensure skilled facilitation of the AAR
-Reinforce that respectful disagreement is OK keep focused on the what, not The Who
-Make sure everyone participates
-End the AAR on a positive note

9

AAR questions

-What was planned?
-What actually happened?
-Why did it happen?
-What can we do next time?

10

Common denominators of fire behavior on tragedy fires

-On relatively small fires or deceptively quiet areas of large fires
-In relatively light fuels, Such as grass, herbs, and light brush
-When there is an unexpected shift in wind direction or in wind speed
-When fire response to topographic conditions and runs uphill

11

Safety zones

And area where a firefighter can survive without a fire shelter
-Separation distance between the firefighter and the flames should be at least four times the maximum continuous flame height

12

Four main reasons you are allowed to turn down an assignment

-There is a violation of safe work practices
-Environmental conditions make the work unsafe
-They lack the necessary qualifications or experience
-Defective equipment is being used

13

"Turn down" definition

A situation where an individual has determined they cannot undertake an assignment as given and they are unable to negotiate an alternative solution

14

What is your obligation if you feel an assignment is unsafe?

You have an obligation to identify, to the degree possible, safe alternatives for completing that assignment. Turning down an assignment is one possible outcome of managing the risk

15

Pilots view in a helicopter

Approximately 11 o'clock to 3 o'clock

16

Size up report

-Incident type
-Location/jurisdiction
-Incident size
-Incident status
-Establish ic and fire name
-Weather conditions
-Radio frequencies
-Best access route
-Special hazards or concerns
-Additional resource needs

17

LCES

Must be established and known to all firefighters before it is needed.

Lookouts
Communication
Escape routes
Safety zones

18

NFPA 704 Placard
Health

Color blue
4-deadly
3-Extreme danger
2- hazardous
1-slightly hazardous
0-normal material

19

NFPA 704 Placard
Fire

Color red
4-below 73°
3-below 100°
2-above 100° not exceeding 200°
1-above 200°
0-Will not burn

20

NFPA 704 Placard
Reactivity

Color yellow
4-May Detonate
3-shock & heat may detonate
2-violent chemical change
1-unstable if heated
0-stable

21

NFPA 704 Placard
Specific hazard

Color white
ACID-acid
ALK-alkali
COR-corrosive
OX-oxidizer
Radioactive symbol-radioactive
W with a line through-use no water
SA-simple asphyxiant
POI-poisonous

22

What is one chain equivalent to

66 feet

23

Fire behavior hauling chart flame length less than 4 feet

Fires can generally be attacked at the head or flanks by firefighters using hand tools Handline should hold fire

24

Fire behavior hauling chart 4 to 8 feet flame lengths

Fires are too intense for direct attack on the head with handtools Handline cannot be relied on to hold the fire dozers, tractor plows, engines and retardant drops can be effective

25

Fire behavior hauling chart 8 to 11 feet flame lengths

Fire may present serious control problems: torching, crowning, and spotting. Control efforts at the head will probably be ineffective

26

Fire behavior hauling chart over 11 feet flame lengths

Crowning, spotting, and major fire runs are probable. Control efforts at the head of the fire are ineffective

27

Direct attack advantages

-Minimal area is burned; no additional area is intentionally burn
-Safest place to work; firefighters can usually escape into the burned area
-The uncertainties of firing operations can be reduced/Eliminated

28

Direct attack disadvantages

-Firefighters can be hampered by heat, smoke and flames
-Control lines can be very long and irregular
-Burning material can easily spread across mid slope lines
-May not be able to use natural or existing barriers
-More mop up and patrol is usually required

29

Indirect attack advantages

-Control lines can be located using favorable topography
-Natural or existing barriers can be used
-Firefighters may not have to work in smoke and heat
-Control lines can be constructed in lighter fuels
-There may be less danger of slop over

30

Indirect attack disadvantages

-More area will be burned
-Must be able to trade time and space for line to be constructed and fired
-Firefighters may be in more danger because they are distant from the fire and have unburned fuel's between them and the fire
-There may be some dangers related to firing operations
-Firing operations may leave unburned islands of fuel
-May not be able to use control line already built

31

MIST

Minimum impact suppression tactics
The intent of minimum impact suppression tactics is to manage a wildland fire with the least impact to natural and cultural resources

32

Reporting fire chemical introductions requirements

If you see anything that suggest fire chemicals may have been introduced into a waterway the 300 foot buffer zone or a threatened endangered species habitat inform your supervisor information is to be forwarded through the chain of command to the incident commander

33

International phonetic alphabet

Alpha, bravo, Charlie, Delta, echo, foxtrot, golf, hotel, India, Juliet, kilo, lima, Mike, November, Oscar, papa, Quebec, Romeo, Sierra, tango, uniform, Victor, whiskey, x-ray, Yankee, Zulu

34

Wildland flagging colors

-Red and white striped = Life hazard
-Black and yellow striped= General hazard
-Pink = escape routes and safety zones
-Green = archaeological
-Blue = water

35

DRAW-D

Defend
Reinforce
Advance
Withdrawal
Delay

36

PACE

Primary= offense
Alternative=offense
Contingency=defense
Emergency=defense

37

SFACTS

Survival
Fire environment
Access
Construction/clearance
Time constraints
Stay or go

38

Air tactical group supervisor(ATGS)

Coordinates fixed and rotary wing aircraft assigned to the fire.
Also used for mapping, reconnaissance, aerial photography, lightning detection, and USFS lead plane

39

VLAT Air tanker

DC – 10 tanker 910
King air e-90 lead plane
12,000 gallons
$26,500 per hour

40

Type one air tanker

3000+ gallons of retardant
Lockheed C-130 Hercules
Lockheed P3 – a Orion
Air national guard C – 130 modular airborne fire fighting system
(MAFFS)
All three examples 3000 gallons

41

Type two air tanker

1800 to 2999 gallons
Douglas DC – 4 airliner 2000 gallons
Consolidated PB4y2 privateer 2200 gallons
Lockheed SP – 2H 2000 gallons
Lockheed P2v Neptune 2400 gallons

42

Type three air tanker

600 to 1799 gallons
S –2 air tanker 1200 gallons
Canadair CL – 415 super scooper 1300 gallons class a foam
PBY – 5a Catalina 1100 gallons class a foam

43

When are air tankers most effective?

On initial attack followed up with fast and aggressive ground action

44

Type one helicopter

16 seats including pilot
5000 pound card weight capacity
700 gallon bucket
Examples CH-54A, CH-47, K – Max, MI-14.
S – 64 heli-Tanker 2000+ gallons

45

Type two helicopter

10 seats including pilot
2500 pounds weight capacity
300 gallons tank or bucket
Examples Bell-214, and 205, S-58, and S – 55T, Bell 212, bell-UH1H CDF-super Huey

46

Type three helicopter

News helicopter/astrea

47

Commercial kitchen extinguisher requirement?

Class K

48

Repair garage required extinguisher

3A: 40 BC

49

Spray booth extinguishers

4A: 60 BC

50

Extinguisher required within 30 feet of hot work/welding

2A: 40 BC

51

Hood system requirements

Must meet UL 300 and be serviced every six months

52

Sprinkler systems requirements

Tested annually and serviced and certified every five years

53

Spray booth requirements

-have a working suppression system cover the heads with baggies
-must be grounded and bonded
-4a: 60 BC extinguisher
-no storage allowed in booth
-3 foot clearance around the booth
-interlock system in place open door shuts down paint sprayer

54

Fuel dispensing requirements

-All electrical in permanent wiring
-Emergency shut off switch access
-Above ground tank must have double wall tank or dike containment

55

What are the three possible inspection outcomes?

-Correction notice = for all violations other than permit required/smoke logs
-Pass = no violations and not permitted
-Permit required = if only violation his permit required/fees due

56

Structure triage categories

-Not threatened
-Threatened defensible
-Threatened non-defensible

57

Structure defense tactical actions

-Check and go
-Prep and go
-Prep and defend
-Fire front following
-Bump and run
-Anchor and hold
-Tactical patrol

58

Repair garage requirements

-approved rubbish cans with lids
-parts cleaners with fusible links
-No smoking signs
-Approved welding equipment, hose, hose gauges
-Separate stored oxygen and acetylene
-UL 142 rated tanks/containers

59

Why Life safety inspections?

-The three e's in the inspection model.
- our professional and civic responsibility for Public Safety
-opportunities for engine company to become familiar with occupancies, provide a professional reflection of the engine company, continue support of the organization

60

Inspection form absolutes

-correct file number
-Business information at the top
-Business licenses and permits
-protection systems and extinguishers including smoke detector logs
-Business and fire department information
-that information is complete