Y5 - Knee: Meniscus injuries Flashcards Preview

Year 5 Acute Care & Trauma > Y5 - Knee: Meniscus injuries > Flashcards

Flashcards in Y5 - Knee: Meniscus injuries Deck (24):
1

who is commonly at risk of meniscal tears

sportspersons (twisting sports)

2

signs and symptoms

catching, locking, or buckling of the knee
knee pain

3

what is the gold standard investigation for meniscal tears

MRI

4

what are the two types of aetiology of meniscal tears

traumatic
degenerative

5

what do the menisci do

are shock absorbers and force distributors

6

where are the menisci located

between the femur and tibia

7

are medial or lateral meniscal lesions more common

medial

8

epi

common in young (traumatic)
common in elderly (degeneration)

9

aetiology of traumatic meniscal tears

common in twisting sports

10

aetiology of degenerative meniscal tears

during normal activities as a consequence of ageing

11

why cannot the meniscus heal itself

poor vascular supply

12

what injury predisposes to meniscal injury

ACL injury

13

why does buckling, locking, and catching occur with a meniscus tear

produces a rough surface inside the knee

14

signs and symptoms

knee swelling
sensation of knee instability or buckling/catching
knee pain
RFs (ACL injury, trauma)

15

what is the McMurrays test

positive in meniscal tear

16

what is the Apleys test

positive in meniscal tear

17

first line investigation

MRI

18

management

RICE with short periods of NSAIDs (paracetamol is preferred)
if >1cm surgery

19

why are NSAIDs only to be used for short periods

they have negative effects on musculoskeletal growth

20

complications

degenerative arthritis

21

prognosis

usually results in return to full health however a chonic undiagnosed meniscal tear may cause degenerative arthritis

22

prognosis after partial meniscectomy

a couple of weeks

23

prognosis after a meniscus repair

6 months

24

a meniscus reconstruction

3 months with added time for maturation