1. Biomechanics of Lumbar and Thoracic Spine Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 1. Biomechanics of Lumbar and Thoracic Spine Deck (17)
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1

How is side bending and rotation named?

Side bending = concavity
Rotation = anterior -superior rotation of vertebral body

2

What is the Rule of Three's for Spinous Processes of Thoracics?

T1-T3: directly posterior
T4-T6: Halfway between that level and the one below
T7-T9: At the level of the body one segment below
T10: Same as T7-T9
T11: Same as T4-T6
T12: Same as T1-T3

3

Where is the spine of scapula? Where are the transverse processes?

T3: Straight Across

4

Where is the inferior border of the scapula? Where are the transverse process of this vertebra?

T7: T6

5

What is Fryette's First Principle of Spinal motion? What type of mechanics is this? How many segments does it use?

In neutral position, rotation and side-bending will occur to OPPOSITE sides.

Type 1 Mechanics: involving 3 or more segments or vertebrae.

6

What is the cause of a Type I Mechanic dysfunction? What muscles hold this dysfunction in space.

Caused by postural reasons.

The long restrictor muscles (I love spaghetti muscles) hold these into place.

7

What is Fryette's Second Principle of Spinal motion? What type of mechanics is this? How many segments does it use?

In hyper-flexion or hyper-extension, rotation and side-bending occur to the SAME side.

Type II Mechanics/ Non-neutral; only 1-2 vertebrae dysfunction

8

What is the cause of a Type II Mechanic dysfunction? What muscles hold this dysfunction in space.

Caused by Trauma!

Held together by short restrictor muscles (transverspinalis-rotares, interspinales, and intertransverarii)

9

TQ: What is Fryette's Third Principle of Spinal Motion? What OMM technique is this the principle basis of?

Inducing motion in one plane limits/restricts motion in the other planes.

Principle of HVLA

10

What are the assumptions of Fryette's principles?

- Normal motion is assumed
- Dysfunction can happen in any combination
- The majority of somatic dysfunctions follow Fryette's Principles.

11

What are the guidelines for segemental motion testing?

Test in Neutral, flexion (fold-up/forward bending), and extension (sphinx/TV/backward bending) to find problem.

12

If a segments gets better both in forward and backward or no change in either, what type of dysfunction do you have?

a neutral dysfunction.

13

If a segments gets worse in forward and better in backward, what type of dysfunction do you have?

extension dysfunction

14

If a segments gets worse in backward and better in forward, what type of dysfunction do you have?

flexion dysfunction

15

How do you name somatic dysfunctions in terms of position?

By where you find them living (their freedom of motion).

16

If you are assessing T8, with the transverse process prominent on the right, it gets worse in sphinx position, better in fold up position. What do you have? Write what you would see on a chart.

T8 FRrSr

17

If you are assessing L3, with the transverse process prominent on the left, and there is no change in sphinx or fold-up positions. What do you have? Write what you would see on a chart.

L3 NRlSr