1) Elements Of A Hand Flashcards Preview

Poker > 1) Elements Of A Hand > Flashcards

Flashcards in 1) Elements Of A Hand Deck (25)
Loading flashcards...
1

What does elements of a hand refer to?

The questions you must assess in order to make a good play with your hole cards and position.

2

How many elemental questions must you consider on each hand?

Eleven.

3

What is the first question you must ask each time you are dealt new cards?

What is the status of the tournament?

4

Why is it important to ask what the status of the tournament is?

As long as the cut-off point for prizes is distant, play remains normal.

As play gets closer to the cut-off point and there are fewer players, they tend to be more conservative and preserve their chips. Good players become more aggressive and see this period as the best chance to steal some easy chips.

5

What is the second question you must ask yourself each time you are dealt new cards?

How many players are at the table?

6

Why is it important to ask how many players are at your table?

A full table, 9-10 players, generally requires tighter play.

Short tables, 6 players or less, hand requirements shrink and there more opportunity to pilfer pots.

7

What is the third question you must ask yourself each time you are dealt new cards?

Who are the players at your table?

8

Why is it important to ask who the players at your table are?

Are they conservative players, aggressive players, or a mix of the two?

The most profitable style at any table is usually the opposite style of the other players at the table.

If the table is aggressive, be conservative. Pick a good hand and be prepared to go all the way with it.

If the table is tight, move out and try to steal a few pots.

9

What is the fourth question you must ask yourself each time you are dealt new cards?

How does your stack compare to the blinds and antes?

10

Why is it important to ask how your stack compares to the blinds and antes?

If they are tiny compared to your stack, you can survive many rounds without playing and can choose your hands more carefully.

If your stack is only a few times more than the blinds or antes, then you must become aggressive to compensate.

11

What is the fifth question you must ask yourself each time you are dealt new cards?

How big are the other stacks at your table?

12

Why is it important to ask how big the other stacks at the table are?

If you have a large stack compared to the other players, you can probably bully them around. You have the ability to completely eliminate them so they have to respect that.

If your stack is middle of the pack, you can still somewhat bully the smaller stacks, but be weary when going against the bigger stacks.

If you are the small stack, you have to pick a spot and try to double or triple up.

13

When should you consider the elements of a hand?

On every new deal.

14

What is the sixth question you must ask yourself each time you are dealt new cards?

Where do you sit in relation to the aggressive and passive players?

15

Why is it important to ask where you sit in relation to the aggressive and passive players?

Your pot stealing chances are enhanced when you have passive players reacting to you.

With aggressive players sitting behind you, the right strategy is to play fewer hands, but play them more decisively.

16

What is the seventh question you must ask yourself each time you are dealt new cards?

What bets have been made in front of you?

17

Why is it important to ask what bets have been made in front of you?

The only absolutely strong hand before the flop is a pair of aces.

All other hands have to be evaluated in terms of the betting that has already occurred.

A pair of jacks is a good hand when several players in front of you have folded, but if you're facing bet-raise-reraise, it's likely to be second-or third-best.

18

What is the eighth question you must ask yourself each time you are dealt new cards?

How many active players are left after you act?

19

Why is it important to ask how many active players are left after you act?

The more potential action, the more cautiously you play.

20

What is the ninth question you must ask yourself each time you are dealt new cards?

What are the pot odds?

21

Why is it important to ask what the pot odds are?

When making a bet, you are always comparing the odds offered by the pot to the odds of making your hand.

You always want the pot to offer you better odds than the odds of filling the hand you're drawing to.

You're also watching the odds you are giving to your opponent as he tries to make his hand, to see if you can deny him the odds he needs to call.

22

What is the tenth question you must ask yourself each time you are dealt new cards?

What is your position at the table after the flop?

23

Why is it important to ask yourself what your position will be after the flop?

It's bad to act first in a hand, because you have to act with no new information about your opponents.

It's good to act last, because you get to see what your opponents have done, hence gaining information, before you have to make a decision.

24

What is the eleventh question you must ask yourself each time you are dealt new cards?

What are your cards?

25

Why is it important to know what your cards are?

Because sometimes they will be how you win the hand and other times the other factors will win you the hand.