3.3 Political Parties Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 3.3 Political Parties Deck (24):
1

Who is the 'head' of parties?

Party chairman

2

Who are the chairmen of the republican and Democratic national committees?

Republican - Reince Priebus
Democrats - Tom Perez

3

Examples of state level party organisation

State Party Convention
County Committees
District Committees
Precinct Committees

4

Typical republican voters

Male
White
Protestant & evangelical
Wealthy
Rural & suburban
Southern & Midwestern
Conservatice

5

Typical Democrat voters

Female
Many ethnicities
Catholic but not especially church-going
Poorer
Urban
Northeastern, Great Lakes and West Coast
Liberal

6

Reasons for increased partisanship

Shift of southern Democrats to Republican Party
End of Cold War consensus in foreign policy following collapse of Soviet Union
Polarising presidencies of Clinton, Bush and Obama
Effect of new media e.g. Internet, TV, talk radio

7

Since when has every president been either a Republican or Democrat?

1856

8

In 2017 115th Congress how many independents are there?

Only 2 - Angus King for Maine and Bernie Sanders for Vermont

9

Why does the USA have a 2 party system?

Winner takes all electoral system
All embracing nature of two major parties - allows little room for third parties

10

In what states have the Democrats and Republicans almost always won in last 50 years?

Democrats always win in Massachusetts
Republicans always win in Wyoming

11

Who popularised the idea of party decline, when and in what book?

David Broder in the 1970s in his book 'The Party's Over'

12

What suggests that there is party decline?

1. Parties have lost control over presidential candidate selection
2. TV, opinion polls and new media have bypassed parties as the way candidates communicate with voters
3. Campaign are more candidate- and issue-centres - rise in split-ticket voting
4. Emergence of 'movements' (Tea Party and Occupy) shows decline in attachment to traditional parties

13

What suggests that there is party renewal?

1. All presidents and almost all congress people are from parties
2. Super delegates retain some control of parties over presidential candidate selection
3. Move towards 'nationalising of campaigns'
4. Increased partisanship

14

How many Republicans voted for Obama's healthcare reform legislation in 2010?

0

15

Examples of nation third parties

Reform Party
Green Party
Libertarian Party

16

Who was the last 3rd party candidate to gain more than 5%of the popular vote?

Ross Perot for the Reform Party in 1996

17

How much of the popular vote did Gary Johnson won for the Libertarian party in 2016?

3.2%

18

How much of the popular vote does a party need to gain federal funding for the next election?

5%

19

What obstacles face third parties?

1. Electoral system
2. Federal campaign finance laws
3. State ballot access laws
4. Lack of resources
5. Lack of media coverage
6. Regarded as too ideological
7. Tactics of the two major parties

20

What do states require in order for third parties to get on the ballot?

A petition signed by a certain number of registered voters in the state.

21

How many signatures are required for third parties to get on ballot in Tennessee and Montana?

25 signature in Tennessee
5% of all registered voters in Montana

22

How to the tactics of the other two major parties disadvantage third parties?

Larger parties can just adopt some of a popular third party's policies to win over their voters.

23

When was the Tea Party movement formed?

2009 in opposition to Obama's economic stimulus package

24

What are the core beliefs of the Tea Party movement?

1. Strict adherence to the Constitution
2. Limited government
3. Reducing government spending and taxation
4. Reducing national debt and federal budget deficit