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AP World History Comparative Essay Rubric

Basic Core: 7 points possible
1. Provides an appropriate, explicitly stated, thesis that DIRECTLY addresses a comparison of the issues or themes specified. 1 pt.
2. a. Addresses differences and similarities, though not necessarily or evenly. 2 pts.
b. Address either differences or similarities. 1pt.
3. a. Substantiates thesis with appropriate historical evidence, 4 or more. 2 pts.
b. Partially substantiates thesis with appropriate evidence, 3 or less. 1 pt.
4. Makes at least one or two relevant, direct comparisons between or among societies. 1 pt.
5. Analyzes at least one reason for a similarity or difference identified in a direct comparison. 1pt.

Expanded Core: 2 points possible
Expands beyond basic core of 1 to 7 points. A student MUST earn 7 points in the basic core area before earning points in the expanded core area. SCORING IN THIS AREA IS AT THE DISCRETION OF THE READER!
-Has a clear, analytical, and comprehensive thesis
-Analyzes all issues of the question (as relevant): global context, chronology, causation, change, continuity, effects, content
-Relates comparisons to a larger global context
-Makes several direct comparisons consistently between or among societies
-Consistently analyzes the causes and effects of relevant similarities and differences
Grading Scale:
9 = 100
8 = 95
7 = 91
6 = 88
5 = 82
4 = 75
3 = 70
2 = 65
1 = 55

1

AP World History Continuity/Change Over Time Essay Rubric

Basic Core- 7 points possible
-Provides an appropriate, explicitly stated thesis that DIRECTLY specifies both change and continuity in the time period(s) specified: 1 pt.
-a. Address both continuity and change in the question, though not necessarily evenly: 2 pts.
b. Address either continuity or change: 1 pt.
-a. Substantiates thesis with appropriate historical evidence for both change and continuity: 2 pts.
b. Partially substantiates thesis with appropriate evidence for continuity and/or change: 1 pt.
-Uses relevant world historical context effectively to explain change over time and/or continuity: 1 pt.
-Analyzes the process of change over time and/or continuity: 1 pt.

Expanded Core: 2 points possible- Expands beyond basic core of 1 to 7 points. A student MUST earn 7 points in the basic core area before earning points in the expanded core area. SCORING IN THIS AREA IS AT THE DISCRETION OF THE READER!
-Has a clear, analytical, and comprehensive thesis
-Analyzes all issues of the question (as relevant): global context, chronology, causation, change, continuity, effects, content
-Addresses all parts of the question evenly
-Provides ample historical evidence to substantiate thesis
-Provides links with relevant ideas, events, and trends in an innovative way
Grading Scale:
9 = 100
8 = 95
7 = 91
6 = 88
5 = 82
4 = 75
3 = 69
2 = 65
1 = 55

2

AP World History Document Based Question Essay Rubric

Basic Core: 7 points possible
1. Provides an appropriate, explicitly stated thesis that DIRECTLY addresses the question: 1 pt.
2. Understands the basic meaning of the documents: 1 pt.
3. a. Supports the thesis with appropriate evidence from all or but one of the documents: 2 pts.
b. Supports the thesis with appropriate evidence from all or but two of the documents: 1 pt.
4. Analyzes point of view in at least two documents: 1 pt.
5. Analyzes the documents by grouping them in two or three ways, depending on the question: 1 pt.
6. Identifies and explains the need for one type of appropriate additional document or source
Expanded Core: 2 points possible (Expands beyond basic core of 1 to 7 points/A student MUST earn 7 points in the basic core area before earning points in the expanded core area)
-Has a clear, analytical, and comprehensive thesis
-Uses documents persuasively as evidence
-Shows careful and insightful analysis of the documents
-Analyzes the documents in additional ways- additional groupings or other
-Brings in relevant outside historical information
-Analyzes point of view in most or all of the documents
-Explains why additional types of document(s) or sources are needed
Grading Scale:
9 =100
8 = 95
7 = 89
6 = 84
5 = 80
4 = 75
3 = 70
2 = 65
1 = 55

3

PERSIA Model: Political, Economic, Religious, Social, Intellectual, Area

Political Influences:
-Structure
-War
-Treaties
-Courts/Laws
-Leaders
-Popular participation
-Loyalty to leader
Economic Influences:
-States control of trade/industry
-Agriculture/Industry importance
-Labor systems
-Levels of technology
-Levels of international trade
-Gender and slaves
-Money system
Religious Influences:
-Importance on societal interaction
-Holy books
-Beliefs/teachings
-Conversion - role of missionaries
-Sin/salvation
-Deities
Social Influences:
-Family order - patriarchal, matriarchal
-Gender relations - role of women, children
-Social classes - slavery
-Entertainment
-Life styles
Intellectual Influences - The Arts:
-Art and music
-Writing and literature
-Philosophy
-Math/science
-Education
-Inventions
Area - Geographic Influences:
-Location
-Physical
-Movement

5

GRAPES: Thematic Analysis of History

Geography:
-Demography/Settlement & Migration Patterns
-Urbanization/Cities
-Regions/Literature
-Human Interaction with Physical Earth
-Environment/Land Management Systems
Religion:
-Belief Systems
-World Views
-Philosophy
-Secularism/Atheism
-Ideologies and "isms"
Accomplishments:
-Cultural Artifacts
-Music/Literature
-Intellectual Movements
-Inventions/Innovations/Technology
-Education
Politics:
-Nations/Nationalism
-Empires/Rulers
-Forms of Government
-Revolts/Revolutions/Conflict
-State-building/Expansion
Economics:
-Economic Systems
-Agriculture/Industrialization
-Capitalism/Socialism
-Business Organizations
-Labor Movements/Organizations
Social Structures:
-Social/Economic Classes
-Gender Roles/Relations
-Elites/Inequalities
-Family/Kinship
-Racial/Ethnic Constructs

6

Optics: Visual Primary Source Analysis

Overview:
-Conduct a brief overview of the visual.
-Summarize what you see.
Parts:
-Zero in on the parts of the visual.
-What is in the center?
-Divide the visual into four sections. What is in each section?
-What's in the foreground? Background?
-Read all labels.
-Note any elements or details that seem important.
Title:
-Read the title of the visual to be clear on the subject it is covering.
Interrelationships:
-Use the titles as the theory and the parts of the visual as clues to detect and specify the interrelationships in the visual.
-How are the parts connected to each other?
-How are the parts connected to the title?
Conclusion:
-Draw a conclusion about the visual as a whole.
-What does it mean?
-Why was it included with the text?
-Summarize the message of the visual.
Source:
-Who created the source?
-Where did it originate?
-When was it created?

7

SOAPSSTONE: Primary Source Document Analysis

Subject:
-What is the main idea of the document?
-What is it about?
-Summarize in a sentence.
Occasion:
-What is the time?
-What is the current situation, context or historical era?
Audience:
-For whom is the document created?
-To whom is the creator of the document speaking?
-Who is the intended audience?
Purpose:
-Why was the document created?
-Why is author writing it?
Point of View:
-What is the position of the author in relation to the document, as indicated by the author's outlook from which the events are depicted and by the attitude or tone expressed?
-What is the author's specified or stated manner of consideration or appraisal?
-What is the opinion, attitude, or judgement of the author?
Speaker:
-Whose voice is telling the "story"?
-Is that voice the same as the author?
Tone:
-What is the feeling or manner of expression used by the author of the document?

8

APPARTS Overview

Author: Who created the source? What do you know about the author? What is the author's point of view?
Place and Time: Where and when was the source produced? How might this affect the meaning of the source?
Prior Knowledge: Beyond information about the author and the context of its creation, what do you know that would help you further understand the primary source? For example, do you recognize any symbols and recall what they represent?
Audience: For whom was the source created and how this affect the reliability of the source?
Reason: Why was the source produced at the time it was produced?
The Main Idea: What point is the document trying to convey? How would you summarize it?
Significance: Why is this source important? What inferences can you draw from this document? Ask yourself, "So what" in relation to the question asked.

9

Summarize vs. Analyze

Summarize:
a. Do I understand the content of the article?: You should be able to explain the article to someone else using non-technical language in about 3-5 minutes.
b. Am I able to write a summary of the articles main claims, procedures, and results in less space than the actual article takes up?

Analyze;
a. Who is the audience for this article? Is the tone, level of discourse, amount of detail, etc., appropriate for the audience?
b. What questions does the author pose (what is the hypothesis or claim)?
c. Does the author answer these questions?
d. What new questions does the author raise (read the conclusions carefully)?
e. Does the article raise questions for you that the author doesn't address?
f. Where does this article fit into professional knowledge about this topic? Does it seem to make a contribution? Is it very similar to other articles on the topic? (You may not be able to answer this one unless you have read a number of articles on the same topic.)