Blood conditions OSCEable for explaining Flashcards Preview

Medicine year 3 TCD > Blood conditions OSCEable for explaining > Flashcards

Flashcards in Blood conditions OSCEable for explaining Deck (9)
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1
Q

Anaemia what is it?

A

Normally our RBCs carry oxygen to supply our cells which acts as a fuel for them.
We need various substances to make RBCs, so if we lack any of these it could impair how we transport oxygen to tissues. This can also cause anaemia.

2
Q

Anaemia symptoms

A

Fatigue, weakness, paleness, palpitations, headache etc

3
Q

Anaemia treatment

A

dietary supplementation of missing nutrients. Then can replace iron w/ supplements. Iron tablet counselling:
Iron is required to make RBCs. This’ll ensure RBCs can be produced efficiently and stop you feeling tired.
Taken 1-3x daily orally.
Usually for 4 months
Normally takes 3-4 weeks to notice effects.
Side effects: stomach irritation- avoid by taking tablets w/ food, can cause stools to be black- harmless an common.

4
Q

Sickle cell anaemia- what is it?

A

When there’s a problem w/ the shape of RBCs, so they can’t carry as much oxygen.
Can be genetic so may have inherited from parents

5
Q

sickle cell anaemia symptoms

A

Palpitations, pallor, fatigue

6
Q

sickle cell complications

A

sickle crises, chest crises, bone crises. Sickle cell crises are managed supportively- treat infection, pain killers, keep warm. Can be triggered eg by infection, or be spontaneous.

7
Q

Haemophilia what is it

A

Normally we have clotting factors in our blood that help it stick together/clot when we get a cut or injury.
In haemophilia one of these clotting factors is at v low lvls, meaning the body has a reduced ability to clot.
Inherited from our parents, but more common in males than females

8
Q

Haemophilia signs and symptoms

A

Easy bruising
Cuts bleeding excessively
prolonged nosebleeds
menorrhagia

9
Q

Haemophilia management

A

Avoid NSAIDs, antiplateltes and anticoagulants.
Can offer IV infusion of the affected clotting factor.
Not usually a dangerous condition, but if you have an accident/large cut you’ll bleed more and therefore at more risk than general population