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Flashcards in blue book #01 Deck (86):
1

a priori

1.
from a general law to a particular instance; valid independently of observation.

2.
existing in the mind prior to and independent of experience, as a faculty or character trait.

3.
not based on prior study or examination; nonanalytic:
an a priori judgment.

2

apropos

1.
fitting; at the right time; to the purpose; opportunely.

2.
opportune; pertinent:
apropos remarks.

3.
with reference to; in respect or regard to:
apropos of the preceding statement.

3

abandon

a complete surrender to natural impulses without restraint or moderation; freedom from inhibition or conventionality:
to dance with reckless abandon.

4

abase

1.
to reduce or lower, as in rank, office, reputation, or estimation; humble; degrade.

2.
to lower; put or bring down:
He abased his head.

5

abash

to destroy the self-confidence, poise, or self-possession of; disconcert; make ashamed or embarrassed:
to abash someone by sneering.

6

abate

1.
to reduce in amount, degree, intensity, etc.; lessen; diminish:
to abate a tax; to abate one’s enthusiasm.

2.
to diminish in intensity, violence, amount, etc.:
The storm has abated. The pain in his shoulder finally abated.

7

abdicate

1.
to renounce or relinquish a throne, right, power, claim, responsibility, or the like, especially in a formal manner:
The aging founder of the firm decided to abdicate.

2.
to give up or renounce (authority, duties, an office, etc.), especially in a voluntary, public, or formal manner:
King Edward VIII of England abdicated the throne in 1936.

8

aberration

1.
the act of departing from the right, normal, or usual course.

2.
the act of deviating from the ordinary, usual, or normal type.

3.
deviation from truth or moral rectitude.

4.
mental irregularity or disorder, especially of a minor or temporary nature; lapse from a sound mental state.

9

abet

to encourage, support, or countenance by aid or approval, usually in wrongdoing:
to abet a swindler; to abet a crime.

10

abeyance

temporary inactivity, cessation, or suspension:
Let’s hold that problem in abeyance for a while.

11

abhor

to regard with extreme repugnance or aversion; detest utterly; loathe; abominate.

12

abject

1.
utterly hopeless, miserable, humiliating, or wretched:
abject poverty.

2.
contemptible; despicable; base-spirited:
an abject coward.

3.
shamelessly servile; slavish.

13

abjure

1.
to renounce, repudiate, or retract, especially with formal solemnity; recant:
to abjure one’s errors.

2.
to renounce or give up under oath; forswear:
to abjure allegiance.

3.
to avoid or shun.

14

ablution

1.
a cleansing with water or other liquid, especially as a religious ritual.

2.
the liquid thus used.

15

abnegate

1.
to refuse or deny oneself (some rights, conveniences, etc.); reject; renounce.

2.
to relinquish; give up.

16

abolish

to do away with; put an end to; annul; make void:
to abolish slavery.

17

abominable

1.
repugnantly hateful; detestable; loathsome:
an abominable crime.

2.
very unpleasant; disagreeable:
The weather was abominable last week.

3.
very bad, poor, or inferior:
They have abominable taste in clothes.

18

abortive

1.
failing to succeed; unsuccessful:
an abortive rebellion; an abortive scheme.

2.
born prematurely.

3.
imperfectly developed; rudimentary.

19

abrasive

1.
any material or substance used for grinding, polishing, etc., as emery, pumice, or sandpaper.

2.
harsh, rough; tending to abrade; causing abrasion; abrading.

3.
tending to annoy or cause ill will; overly aggressive:
an abrasive personality.

20

abridge

1.
to shorten by omissions while retaining the basic contents:
to abridge a reference book.

2.
to reduce or lessen in duration, scope, authority, etc.; diminish; curtail:
to abridge a visit; to abridge one’s freedom.

3.
to deprive; cut off.

21

abrogate

1.
to abolish by formal or official means; annul by an authoritative act; repeal:
to abrogate a law.

2.
to put aside; put an end to.

22

abrupt

1.
sudden or unexpected:
an abrupt departure.

2.
curt or brusque in speech, manner, etc.:
an abrupt reply.

3.
terminating or changing suddenly:
an abrupt turn in a road.

4.
having many sudden changes from one subject to another; lacking in continuity or smoothness:
an abrupt writing style.

5.
steep; precipitous:
an abrupt descent.

23

abscond

to depart in a sudden and secret manner, especially to avoid capture and legal prosecution:
The cashier absconded with the money.

24

absolve

1.
to free from guilt or blame or their consequences:
The court absolved her of guilt in his death.

2.
to set free or release, as from some duty, obligation, or responsibility:
to be absolved from one’s oath.

25

abstain

1.
to hold oneself back voluntarily, especially from something regarded as improper or unhealthy:
to abstain from eating meat.

2.
to refrain from casting one’s vote:
a referendum in which two delegates abstained.

26

abstemious

1.
sparing or moderate in eating and drinking; temperate in diet.

2.
characterized by abstinence:
an abstemious life.

3.
sparing:
an abstemious diet.

27

abstruse

hard to understand; recondite; esoteric:
abstruse theories.

28

accede

1.
to give consent, approval, or adherence; agree; assent; to accede to a request; to accede to the terms of a contract.

2.
to attain or assume an office, title, or dignity; succeed:
to accede to the throne.

29

accentuate

1.
to give emphasis or prominence to.

2.
to mark or pronounce with an accent.

30

access

1.
the ability, right, or permission to approach, enter, speak with, or use; admittance:
They have access to the files.

2.
the state or quality of being approachable:
The house was difficult of access.

3.
a way or means of approach:
The only access to the house was a rough dirt road.

31

acclaim

1.
to welcome or salute with shouts or sounds of joy and approval; applaud:
to acclaim the conquering heroes.

2.
to announce or proclaim with enthusiastic approval:
to acclaim the new king.

3.
to make acclamation; applaud.

32

acclamation

1.
a loud shout or other demonstration of welcome, goodwill, or approval.

2.
act of acclaiming.

33

acclimate

to accustom or become accustomed to a new climate or environment; adapt.

34

accolade

1.
any award, honor, or laudatory notice:
The play received accolades from the press.

2.
a light touch on the shoulder with the flat side of the sword or formerly by an embrace, done in the ceremony of conferring knighthood.

35

accommodate

1.
to do a kindness or a favor to; oblige:
to accommodate a friend by helping him move to a new apartment.

2.
to provide suitably; supply:
The officials were accommodated with seats toward the front of the room.

3.
to lend money to:
Can you accommodate him, or are you short of cash?

4.
to provide with a room and sometimes with food.

5.
to furnish with accommodations, as food and lodgings.

6.
to have or make room for:
Will this elevator accommodate 10 people?

7.
to make suitable or consistent; adapt:
to accommodate oneself to circumstances.

36

accomplice

a person who knowingly helps another in a crime or wrongdoing, often as a subordinate.

37

accord

1.
to be in agreement or harmony; agree.

2.
to make agree or correspond; adapt.

3.
to grant; bestow:
to accord due praise.

4.
proper relationship or proportion; harmony.

5.
a harmonious union of sounds, colors, etc.

6.
consent or concurrence of opinions or wills; agreement.

38

accorded

granted or given especially as appropriate, due, or earned

39

accost

1.
to confront boldly:
The beggar accosted me for money.

2.
to approach, especially with a greeting, question, or remark.

40

accoutrement

1.
personal clothing, accessories, etc.

2.
the equipment, excluding weapons and clothing, of a soldier.

41

accretion

1.
an increase by natural growth or by gradual external addition; growth in size or extent.

2.
the result of this process.

3.
an added part; addition:
The last part of the legend is a later accretion.

4.
the growing together of separate parts into a single whole.

42

accrue

1.
to happen or result as a natural growth, addition, etc.

2.
to be added as a matter of periodic gain or advantage, as interest on money.

43

acerbic

1.
sour or astringent in taste:
Lemon juice is acerbic.

2.
harsh or severe, as of temper or expression:
acerbic criticism.

44

acme

the highest point; summit; peak:
The empire was at the acme of its power.

45

acquiesce

to assent tacitly; submit or comply silently or without protest; agree; consent:
to acquiesce halfheartedly in a business plan.

46

acquisitive

tending or seeking to acquire and own, often greedily; eager to get wealth, possessions, etc.:
our acquisitive impulses; acquisitive societies.

47

acquit

to relieve from a charge of fault or crime; declare not guilty:
They acquitted him of the crime. The jury acquitted her, but I still think she’s guilty.

48

acrimony

sharpness, harshness, or bitterness of nature, speech, disposition, etc.:
The speaker attacked him with great acrimony.

49

actuate

1.
to incite or move to action; impel; motivate:
actuated by selfish motives.

2.
to put into action; start a process; turn on:
to actuate a machine.

50

acuity

sharpness; acuteness; keenness:
acuity of vision; acuity of mind.

51

acumen

keen insight; shrewdness:
remarkable acumen in business matters.

52

ad hoc

1.
for the special purpose or end presently under consideration:
a committee formed ad hoc to deal with the issue.

2.
concerned or dealing with a specific subject, purpose, or end:
The ad hoc committee disbanded after making its final report.

53

ad lib

1.
to improvise all or part of (a speech, a piece of music, etc.):
to ad-lib one’s lines.

2.
to act, speak, etc., without preparation:
Throughout the play he had to ad-lib constantly.

3.
impromptu; extemporaneous:
ad-lib remarks to hecklers.

54

adage

a traditional saying expressing a common experience or observation; proverb.

55

adamant

1.
utterly unyielding in attitude or opinion in spite of all appeals, urgings, etc.

2.
too hard to cut, break, or pierce.

56

adept

very skilled; proficient; expert:
an adept juggler.

57

adhere

1.
to stay attached; stick fast: The mud adhered to his shoes.

2.
to be devoted in support or allegiance; be attached as a follower or upholder:
to adhere to a party.

3.
to hold closely or firmly:
to adhere to a plan.

58

adherent

a person who follows or upholds a leader, cause, etc.; supporter; follower.

59

adieu

1. goodbye; farewell.

2.
the act of leaving or departing; farewell.

60

adjacent

1.
lying near, close, or contiguous; adjoining; neighboring:
a motel adjacent to the highway.

2.
just before, after, or facing:
a map on an adjacent page.

61

adjourn

1.
to suspend the meeting of (a club, legislature, committee, etc.) to a future time, another place, or indefinitely:
to adjourn the court.

2.
to defer or postpone to a later time:
They adjourned the meeting until the following Monday.

62

adjunct

1.
something added to another thing but not essential to it.

2.
a person associated with lesser status, rank, authority, etc., in some duty or service; assistant.

3.
a person working at an institution, as a college or university, without having full or permanent status:
My lawyer works two nights a week as an adjunct, teaching business law at the college.

63

adjure

1.
to charge, bind, or command earnestly and solemnly, often under oath or the threat of a penalty.

2.
to entreat or request earnestly or solemnly.

64

admonish

1.
to caution, advise, or counsel against something.

2.
to reprove or scold, especially in a mild and good-willed manner:
The teacher admonished him about excessive noise.

3.
to urge to a duty; remind:
to admonish them about their obligations.

65

adorn

1.
to decorate or add beauty to, as by ornaments:
garlands of flowers adorning their hair.

2.
to make more pleasing, attractive, impressive, etc.; enhance:
Piety adorned Abigail’s character.

66

adroit

1.
expert or nimble in the use of the hands or body.

2.
cleverly skillful, resourceful, or ingenious:
an adroit debater.

67

adulation

excessive devotion to someone; servile flattery.

68

adulterate

to debase or make impure by adding inferior materials or elements; use cheaper, inferior, or less desirable goods in the production of (any professedly genuine article):
to adulterate food.

69

advantageous

providing an advantage; furnishing convenience or opportunity; favorable; profitable; useful; beneficial:
an advantageous position; an advantageous treaty.

70

advent

a coming into place, view, or being; arrival:
the advent of the holiday season.

71

adversarial

1.
a person, group, or force that opposes or attacks; opponent; enemy; foe.

2.
a person, group, etc., that is an opponent in a contest; contestant.

72

adversity

1.
adverse or unfavorable fortune or fate; a condition marked by misfortune, calamity, or distress:
Friends will show their true colors in times of adversity.

2.
an adverse or unfortunate event or circumstance:
You will meet many adversities in life.

73

advocate

1.
to speak or write in favor of; support or urge by argument; recommend publicly:
He advocated higher salaries for teachers.

2.
a person who speaks or writes in support or defense of a person, cause, etc.:
an advocate of peace.

74

aegis

1.
the shield or breastplate of Zeus or Athena.

2.
protection; support:
under the imperial aegis.
3.
sponsorship; auspices:
a debate under the aegis of the League of Women Voters.

75

aerate

to expose to the action or effect of air or to cause air to circulate through:
to aerate milk in order to remove odors.

76

aerodynamic

the branch of mechanics that deals with the motion of air and other gases and with the effects of such motion on bodies in the medium.

77

aesthetic

1.
relating to the philosophy of aesthetics; concerned with notions such as the beautiful and the ugly.

2.
relating to the science of aesthetics; concerned with the study of the mind and emotions in relation to the sense of beauty.

3.
having a sense of the beautiful; characterized by a love of beauty.

4.
relating to, involving, or concerned with pure emotion and sensation as opposed to pure intellectuality.

78

affable

1.
pleasantly easy to approach and to talk to; friendly; cordial; warmly polite:
an affable and courteous gentleman.

2.
showing warmth and friendliness; benign; pleasant:
an affable smile.

79

affected

1.
pretentious; not genuine.

2.
influenced in a harmful way; impaired, harmed, or attacked, as by climate or disease.

3.
impressed; moved; touched:
She was deeply affected by their generosity.

80

affiliation

state of being affiliated or associated.

81

affinity

1.
a natural liking for or attraction to a person, thing, idea, etc.

2.
inherent likeness or agreement; close resemblance or connection.

82

affluent

1.
having an abundance of wealth, property, or other material goods; prosperous; rich:
an affluent person.

2.
abounding in anything; abundant.

3.
flowing freely:
an affluent fountain.

83

afford

1.
to be able to do, manage, or bear without serious consequence or adverse effect:
The country can’t afford another drought.

2.
to be able to meet the expense of; have or be able to spare the price of:
Can we afford a trip to Europe this year? The city can easily afford to repair the street.

3.
to be able to give or spare:
He can’t afford the loss of a day.

4.
to furnish; supply:
The transaction afforded him a good profit.

5.
to be capable of yielding or providing:
The records afford no explanation.

6.
to give or confer upon:
to afford great pleasure to someone.

84

affront

1.
a personally offensive act or word; deliberate act or display of disrespect; intentional slight; insult:
an affront to the king.

2.
an offense to one’s dignity or self-respect.

3.
to offend by an open manifestation of disrespect or insolence:
His speech affronted all of us.

85

afoot

1.
on foot; walking:
I came afoot.

2.
astir; in progress:
There is mischief afoot.

86

aggrandize

1.
to widen in scope; increase in size or intensity; enlarge; extend.

2.
to make great or greater in power, wealth, rank, or honor.