blue book #06 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in blue book #06 Deck (85):
1

carp

1.
to find fault or complain querulously or unreasonably; be niggling in criticizing; cavil:
to carp at minor errors.

2.
a peevish complaint.

2

carte blanche

unconditional authority; full discretionary power:
The government appears to have given the military carte blanche in Afghanistan.
She was given carte blanche to decorate her room as she wished, perhaps an unwise decision on the part of her parents.

3

cartography

the production of maps, including construction of projections, design, compilation, drafting, and reproduction.

4

cast

1.
to throw or hurl; fling:
The gambler cast the dice.

2.
to throw off or away:
He cast the advertisement in the wastebasket.

3.
to direct (the eye, a glance, etc.), especially in a cursory manner:
She cast her eyes down the page.

4.
to cause to fall upon something or in a certain direction; send forth:
to cast a soft light; to cast a spell; to cast doubts.

5

caste

1.
any of the social divisions into which Hindu society is traditionally divided, each caste having its own privileges and limitations, transferred by inheritance from one generation to the next.

2.
any class or group of society sharing common cultural features:
low caste; high caste.

3.
social position conferred upon one by a caste system:
to lose caste.

6

castigate

1.
to criticize or reprimand severely.

2.
to punish in order to correct.

7

cataclysm

1.
any violent upheaval, especially one of a social or political nature.

2.
(geography) a sudden and violent physical action producing changes in the earth’s surface.

3.
an extensive flood; deluge.

8

catalogue

1.
a list or record, as of items for sale or courses at a university, systematically arranged and often including descriptive material:
a stamp catalog.

2.
something that contains such a list or record, as a book, leaflet, or file.

3.
a list of the contents of a library or a group of libraries, arranged according to any of various systems.

4.
any list or record:
a catalog of complaints.

9

catalyst

1.
something that causes activity between two or more persons or forces without itself being affected.

2.
a person or thing that precipitates an event or change:
His imprisonment by the government served as the catalyst that helped transform social unrest into revolution.

3.
a person whose talk, enthusiasm, or energy causes others to be more friendly, enthusiastic, or energetic.

10

catastrophe

1.
a sudden and widespread disaster:
the catastrophe of war.

2.
any misfortune, mishap, or failure; fiasco:
The play was so poor our whole evening was a catastrophe.

3.
a final event or conclusion, usually an unfortunate one; a disastrous end:
the great catastrophe of the Old South at Appomattox.

11

catatonic

1.
having catatonia, a syndrome characterized by muscular rigidity and mental stupor:
The schizophrenic remained in a catatonic state.

2.
appearing to be in a daze or stupor; unresponsive:
She had the catatonic expression of an avant-garde model.

12

categorical

1.
without exceptions or conditions; absolute; unqualified and unconditional:
a categorical denial.

2.
of, relating to, or in a category.

13

catharsis

the purging of the emotions or relieving of emotional tensions, especially through certain kinds of art, as tragedy or music.

14

caucus

1.
a meeting of party leaders to select candidates, elect convention delegates, etc.

2.
a meeting of party members within a legislative body to select leaders and determine strategy.

3.
a faction within a legislative body that pursues its interests through the legislative process:
the Women’s Caucus; the Black Caucus.

15

caulk

1.
to fill or close seams or crevices of (a tank, window, etc.) in order to make watertight, airtight, etc.

2.
to make (a vessel) watertight by filling the seams between the planks with oakum or other material driven snug.

16

causality

the relation of cause and effect:
The result is the same, however differently the causality is interpreted.

17

caustic

1.
capable of burning, corroding, or destroying living tissue.

2.
severely critical or sarcastic:
a caustic remark.

18

cavalier

1.
a horseman, especially a mounted soldier; knight.

2.
one having the spirit or bearing of a knight; a courtly gentleman; gallant.

3.
haughty, disdainful, or supercilious:
an arrogant and cavalier attitude toward others.

4.
offhand or unceremonious:
The very dignified officials were confused by his cavalier manner.

19

caveat

a warning or caution; admonition.

20

cavort

1.
to frolic or prance about.

2.
to behave in a high-spirited, festive manner; make merry.

21

cede

to yield or formally surrender to another:
to cede territory.

22

celestial

1.
pertaining to the sky or visible heaven, or to the universe beyond the earth’s atmosphere, as in celestial body.

2.
pertaining to the spiritual or invisible heaven; heavenly; divine:
celestial bliss.

23

censorious

severely critical; faultfinding; carping.

24

censure

1.
strong or vehement expression of disapproval:
The newspapers were unanimous in their censure of the tax proposal.

2.
an official reprimand, as by a legislative body of one of its members.

3.
to criticize or reproach in a harsh or vehement manner:
She is more to be pitied than censured.

4.
to give censure, adverse criticism, disapproval, or blame.

25

centennial

1.
pertaining to, or marking the completion of, a period of 100 years.

2.
pertaining to a 100th anniversary.

3.
lasting 100 years.

4.
100 years old.

26

centrifugal

1.
moving or directed outward from the center (opposed to centripetal).

2.
pertaining to or operated by centrifugal force:
a centrifugal pump.

27

centripetal

1.
directed toward the center (opposed to centrifugal).

2.
operating by centripetal force.

28

cerebral

1.
of or relating to the cerebrum or the brain.

2.
betraying or characterized by the use of the intellect rather than intuition or instinct:
His is a cerebral music that leaves many people cold.

29

cessation

a temporary or complete stopping; discontinuance:
a cessation of hostilities.

30

cession

1.
act of ceding or surrendering, as by treaty.

2.
something that is ceded, as territory.

31

confer

1.
to consult together; compare opinions; carry on a discussion or deliberation.

2.
to bestow upon as a gift, favor, honor, etc.:
to confer a degree on a graduate.

32

chafe

1.
to wear or abrade by rubbing:
He chafed his shoes on the rocks.

2.
to make sore by rubbing:
Her collar chafed her neck.

3.
to irritate; annoy:
The dripping of the faucet chafed her nerves.

4.
to warm by rubbing:
to chafe cold hands.

5.
to become worn or sore from rubbing:
His neck began to chafe from the starched collar.

6.
to rub; press with friction:
The horse chafed against his stall.

7.
to be irritated or annoyed:
He chafed at their constant interruptions.

33

chagrin

1.
a feeling of vexation, marked by disappointment or humiliation.

2.
to vex by disappointment or humiliation:
The rejection of his proposal chagrined him deeply.

34

chalice

1.
a drinking cup or goblet.

2.
a cuplike blossom.

35

champion

1.
a person who fights for or defends any person or cause:
a champion of the oppressed.

2.
a fighter or warrior.

3.
to act as champion of; defend; support:
to champion a cause.

36

chaos

1.
a state of utter confusion or disorder; a total lack of organization or order.

2.
any confused, disorderly mass:
a chaos of meaningless phrases.

3.
the infinity of space or formless matter supposed to have preceded the existence of the ordered universe.

37

charge

1.
to attack by rushing violently against:
The cavalry charged the enemy.

2.
to accuse formally or explicitly:
They charged him with theft.

3.
to impute; ascribe the responsibility for:
He charged the accident to his own carelessness.

38

charisma

1.
a spiritual power or personal quality that gives an individual influence or authority over large numbers of people.

2.
the special virtue of an office, function, position, etc., that confers or is thought to confer on the person holding it an unusual ability for leadership, worthiness of veneration, or the like.

39

charlatan

a person who pretends or claims to have more knowledge or skill than he or she possesses; quack.

40

chary

1.
cautious or careful; wary:
He was chary of investing in oil wells.

2.
shy; timid.

3.
fastidious; choosy:
She is excessively chary about her friends.

4.
sparing (often followed by of):
chary of his praise.

41

chasm

1.
a yawning fissure or deep cleft in the earth’s surface; gorge.

2.
a breach or wide fissure in a wall or other structure.

3.
a marked interruption of continuity; gap:
a chasm in time.

4.
a sundering breach in relations, as a divergence of opinions, beliefs, etc., between persons or groups.

42

chaste

1.
refraining from sexual intercourse that is regarded as contrary to morality or religion; virtuous.

2.
free from obscenity; decent:
chaste conversation.

3.
undefiled or stainless:
chaste, white snow.

4.
pure in style; not excessively ornamented; simple.

43

chasten

1.
to inflict suffering upon for purposes of moral improvement; chastise.

2.
to restrain; subdue:
Age has chastened his violent temper.

3.
to make chaste in style.

44

chastise

1.
to discipline, especially by corporal punishment.

2.
to criticize severely.

45

chauvinism

1.
zealous and aggressive patriotism or blind enthusiasm for military glory.

2.
biased devotion to any group, attitude, or cause:
religious chauvinism.

3.
the denigration, disparagement, and patronization of either sex based on the belief that one sex is inferior to the other and thus deserving of less than equal treatment or benefit.

46

cherub

1.
a celestial being.

2.
a member of the second order of angels, often represented as a beautiful rosy-cheeked child with wings.

3.
a beautiful or innocent person, especially a child with a sweet, chubby face.

47

chez

at or in the home of; with.

48

chic

1.
attractive and fashionable; stylish:
a chic hat.

2.
style and elegance, especially in dress:
Paris clothes have such chic.

3.
stylishness; modishness:
the chic of the first-nighters.

4.
casual and understated style, as in dress or décor, that expresses a specified trendy lifestyle or activity:
Black-rimmed glasses bring some geek chic to your outfit.

49

chicanery

1.
trickery or deception by quibbling or sophistry:
He resorted to the worst flattery and chicanery to win the job.

2.
a quibble or subterfuge used to trick, deceive, or evade.

50

chide

1.
to express disapproval of; scold; reproach:
The principal chided the children for their thoughtless pranks.

2.
to harass, nag, impel, or the like by chiding:
She chided him into apologizing.

3.
to scold or reproach; find fault.

51

chimera

1.
a mythological, fire-breathing monster, commonly represented with a lion’s head, a goat’s body, and a serpent’s tail.

2.
any similarly grotesque monster having disparate parts, especially as depicted in decorative art.

3.
a horrible or unreal creature of the imagination; a vain or idle fancy:
He is far different from the chimera your fears have made of him.

4.
an organism composed of two or more genetically distinct tissues, as an organism that is partly male and partly female, or an artificially produced individual having tissues of several species.

52

chivalrous

1.
having the qualities of chivalry, as courage, courtesy, and loyalty.

2.
considerate and courteous to women; gallant.

3.
gracious and honorable toward an enemy, especially a defeated one, and toward the weak or poor.

53

choleric

extremely irritable or easily angered; irascible:
a choleric disposition.

54

chortle

1.
to chuckle gleefully.

2.
to express with a gleeful chuckle:
to chortle one’s joy.

55

chromatic

1.
pertaining to color or colors.

2.
involving a modification of the normal music scale by the use of accidentals; progressing by semitones, especially to a tone having the same letter name, as in C to C sharp.

56

chronic

1.
constant; habitual; inveterate:
a chronic liar.

2.
continuing a long time or recurring frequently:
a chronic state of civil war.

3.
having long had a disease, habit, weakness, or the like:
a chronic invalid.

4.
(of a disease) having long duration (opposed to acute).

57

chronicle

1.
a chronological record of events; a history.

2.
to record in or as in a chronicle; to work as a historian.

58

churlish

1.
like a churl; boorish; rude:
churlish behavior.

2.
of a churl; peasant-like; mean.

3.
difficult to work or deal with, as soil.

59

circa

about; used especially in approximate dates:
The Venerable Bede was born circa 673.

abbreviations: ca, ca., c., c, cir., circ.

60

circuitous

roundabout; not direct:
a circuitous route; a circuitous argument.

61

circumlocution

1.
a roundabout or indirect way of speaking; the use of more words than necessary to express an idea.

2.
a roundabout expression.

62

circumnavigate

1.
to sail or fly around; make the circuit of by navigation:
to circumnavigate the earth.

2.
to go or maneuver around:
to circumnavigate the heavy downtown traffic.

63

circumscribe

1.
to draw a line around; encircle:
to circumscribe a city on a map.

2.
to enclose within bounds; limit or confine, especially narrowly:
Her social activities are circumscribed by school regulations.

3.
to mark off; define; delimit:
to circumscribe the area of a science.

64

circumspect

1.
watchful and discreet; cautious; prudent:
circumspect behavior.

2.
well-considered:
circumspect ambition.

65

circumvent

1.
to go around or evade:
to circumvent the lake; to circumvent the real issues.

2.
to avoid (defeat, failure, unpleasantness, etc.) by artfulness or deception; avoid by anticipating or outwitting:
He circumvented capture by anticipating their movements.

3.
to surround or encompass, as by stratagem; entrap:
to circumvent a body of enemy troops.

66

cistern

1.
a reservoir, tank, or container for storing or holding water or other liquid.

2.
a reservoir or receptacle of some natural fluid of the body.

67

citadel

1.
a fortress that commands a city and is used in the control of the inhabitants and in defense during attack or siege.

2.
any strongly fortified place; stronghold.

68

civil

1.
of, relating to, or consisting of citizens:
civil life; civil society.

2.
of, or in a condition of, social order or organized government; civilized:
civil peoples.

3.
adhering to the norms of polite social intercourse; not deficient in common courtesy:
After their disagreement, their relations were civil though not cordial.

69

clairvoyant

1.
psychic; having or claiming to have the power of seeing objects or actions beyond the range of natural vision:
Not being clairvoyant, I did not foresee the danger of ignoring her advice.

2.
of, by, or pertaining to clairvoyance:
Unlike more talented witches, I had to make do with love potions and occasional clairvoyant visions.

70

clamor

1.
a loud uproar, as from a crowd of people:
the clamor of the crowd at the gates.

2.
a vehement expression of desire or dissatisfaction:
the clamor of the proponents of the law.

3.
popular outcry:
The senators could not ignore the clamor against higher taxation.

4.
any loud and continued noise:
the clamor of traffic; the clamor of birds and animals in the zoo.

6.
to drive, force, influence, etc., by clamoring:
The newspapers clamored him out of office.

7.
to utter noisily:
They clamored their demands at the meeting.

71

clandestine

characterized by, done in, or executed with secrecy or concealment, especially for purposes of subversion or deception; private or surreptitious:
Their clandestine meetings went undiscovered for two years.

72

cleave

1.
to adhere closely; stick; cling to.

2.
to remain faithful to:
to cleave to one’s principles in spite of persecution.

3.
to split or divide by or as if by a cutting blow, especially along a natural line of division, as the grain of wood.

4.
to make by or as if by cutting:
to cleave a path through the wilderness.

5.
to penetrate or pass through (air, water, etc.):
The bow of the boat cleaved the water cleanly.

6.
to cut off; sever:
to cleave a branch from a tree.

73

clemency

1.
the quality of being clement; disposition to show forbearance, compassion, or forgiveness in judging or punishing; leniency; mercy.

2.
an act or deed showing mercy or leniency.

3.
(of the weather) mildness or temperateness.

74

clergy

the group or body of ordained persons in a religion, as distinguished from the laity.

75

cliché

1.
a trite, stereotyped expression; a sentence or phrase, usually expressing a popular or common thought or idea, that has lost originality, ingenuity, and impact by long overuse, as sadder but wiser, or strong as an ox.

2.
(in art, literature, drama, etc.) a trite or hackneyed plot, character development, use of color, musical expression, etc.

3.
anything that has become trite or commonplace through overuse.

76

clientele

1.
the clients or customers, as of a professional person or shop, considered collectively; a group or body of clients:
This jewelry store has a wealthy clientele.

2.
dependents or followers.

77

clinical

1.
pertaining to a clinic.

2.
concerned with or based on actual observation and treatment of disease in patients rather than experimentation or theory.

3.
extremely objective and realistic; dispassionately analytic; unemotionally critical:
She regarded him with clinical detachment.

4.
pertaining to or used in a sickroom:
a clinical bandage.

78

clique

a small, exclusive group of people; coterie; set.

79

cloister

1.
a place of religious seclusion, as a monastery or convent.

2.
to confine in a monastery or convent.

3.
to confine in retirement; seclude.

80

cloying

1.
causing or tending to cause disgust or aversion through excess:
a perfume of cloying sweetness.

2.
overly ingratiating or sentimental.

81

coagulate

1.
to change from a fluid into a thickened mass; curdle; congeal:
Let the pudding stand two hours until it coagulates.

2.
(of blood) to form a clot.

82

coalesce

1.
to grow together or into one body:
The two lakes coalesced into one.

2.
to unite so as to form one mass, community, etc.:
The various groups coalesced into a crowd.

3.
to blend or come together:
Their ideas coalesced into one theory.

83

coalition

1.
a combination or alliance, especially a temporary one between persons, factions, states, etc.

2.
a union into one body or mass; fusion.

84

coddle

1.
to treat tenderly; nurse or tend indulgently; pamper:
to coddle children when they’re sick.

2.
to cook (eggs, fruit, etc.) in water that is just below the boiling point; cook gently.

85

coerce

1.
to compel by force, intimidation, or authority, especially without regard for individual desire or volition:
They coerced him into signing the document.

2.
to bring about through the use of force or other forms of compulsion; exact:
to coerce obedience.

3.
to dominate or control, especially by exploiting fear, anxiety, etc.:
The state is based on successfully coercing the individual.