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Flashcards in Brock Deck (14)
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1
Q

2 underlying values

A
  1. self-determination

2. individual well-being

2
Q

self-determination

A

a competent person’s own interests in making decisions according to their conception of the good life (key to human dignity)

3
Q

individual well-being

A

life is a central aspect of well being (either intrinsically or instrumentally)
life can become a burden, not a benefit (patient can decide this)

4
Q

Brock’s Goal: defeat two kinds of arguments

A
  1. euthanasia is always wrong because intentionally killing an innocent person is always wrong
  2. even if it is morally justified in a particular case, it should be prevented because the social policy would have worse overall consequences
5
Q

Deliberate killing

A
  • it is always morally wrong to kill an innocent person
  • active euthanasia is the deliberate killing of an innocent person
  • assumed: passive euthanasia/letting die is not deliberate killing
  • therefore, active euthanasia is always wrong
6
Q

no difference between letting die and killing

A
  • the greedy son example (p. 648)
  • no difference between killing and letting die
  • no difference between the two cases (murder and mercy killing);
    • physician acts with the patient’s consent
    • dr has a good motive
    • dr acts in a social role that authorizes act
7
Q

psychological evasion

A

the disease causes death in passive euthanasia. dr not responsible

8
Q

2 cases

A
  1. failure to intubate with breathing respirator
  2. extubate (taking tube out)
    are they morally different, especially in terms of responsibility?
9
Q

even if killing is worse than letting die…

A

it doesn’t follow that active euthanasia is always wrong

10
Q

Answer

A

it denies the victim something they value: life itself now or a future. doesn’t this imply the person can waive this right when they no longer value life? p. 649

11
Q

potential good consequences of legalizing euthanasia

A
  1. offer respect to those who now can’t determine their lives
  2. public demand satisfied
  3. unnecessary physical and psychological suffering
    - people want to die with dignity and not with prolonged agony. remembered for the good (p. 651)
12
Q

Potential bad consequences

A
  1. undermine trust in physicians
  2. weaken healthcare for the dying
  3. theaten already won progress in support for patient control of decisions
  4. people will be forced to justify/defend their decisions to continue to living
13
Q

More challenges

A
  1. weaken legal prohibitions against homocide
  2. slippery slope
  3. it will lead to nonvoluntary active euthanasia. brock thinks this is the strongest objection
14
Q

slippery slope

A

even though it might do moral good now, it will set up a series of events that will lead to killing people against their will