Kass: Implications of Prenatal Diagnosis for the Human Right to Life Flashcards Preview

Biomedical Ethics > Kass: Implications of Prenatal Diagnosis for the Human Right to Life > Flashcards

Flashcards in Kass: Implications of Prenatal Diagnosis for the Human Right to Life Deck (9)
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1
Q

Argument 1

A

genetic abortion and living defectives will lead to negative views about living defectives (those who were not aborted)

2
Q

Argument 2

A

genetic abortion becomes less about preventing a disease and more about eliminating a defective being

3
Q

possible children and potential parents

A
  1. we ought to try to provide every child with a minimally satisfying life (this principle can be supported by contractarian/utilitarian theories)
  2. a minimally satisfying life requires normal health (note that normal health is somewhat cultural contextual)
  3. a life with huntington’s disease can’t attain normal health
  4. therefore, we ought not create children who can acquire Huntington’s disease
4
Q

it is one thing to claim that we ought to provide some basic good, but it is another thing to claim that…

A

we should always avoid the situation in which the good is deprived or not easily provided
- doesn’t she need a claim like: “we are forbidden from creating non-minimally satisfying lives”?

5
Q
  1. we are forbidden from creating non-minimally satisfying lives
A
  1. a minimally satisfying life requires normal health (note that normal health is somewhat culturally contextual)
  2. a life with huntington’s disease cannot attain normal health
  3. therefore, we are forbidden from creating children who can acquire huntington’s disease
6
Q

possible children

- do possible children have a right to be brought into existence?

A

no, since they do not actually exist, they cannot be maltreated

7
Q

Abortion

A
  1. views of abortion can impact how one sees the morality of aborting to prevent miserable life
  2. possible to believe in the equal dignity of all humans while believing that everyone deserves a high quality of life
8
Q

The case of Huntington’s disease

A
  • if a person carries the defective gene, there is a fifty percent chance they will pass it on to their children
  • disease usually sets in between ages of 30 and 50
9
Q

argument two (2)

A

preventing a defective person versus preventing a disease