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Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy)

 

2nd duaghter mr and mrs bennet

romatically inclined towards mr d

impulsive

intelligent, witty and full of energy and determination

mr b's favourite daughter

loving and lyal

stubborn and soemtimes both proud and prejudiced

idealistica about love and marriage

independent in her views

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Bennet Lively, funny and challenging heroine – her father’s favourite. Initially prejudiced against Darcy and for Wickham, she gains self-knowledge and more serious attitude. Marries Darcy. The novel's heroine and the second oldest of the five Bennet sisters, Elizabeth is smart, lively, and attractive. She prides herself on her ability to analyze other people, but she is very often mistaken in her conclusions about their motivations. To her credit, though, she is eventually able to overcome her own prejudice. Elizabeth places little value on money and social position. Instead she prizes a person's independence of character and personal virtue. Although she is drawn to Darcy, she resists him based on her own mistaken preconceptions about him. Chapter 4 Quotes Oh! you are a great deal too apt, you know, to like people in general. You never see a fault in anybody. All the world are good and agreeable in your eyes. I never heard you speak ill of a human being in your life. Chapter 7 Quotes Darcy had at first scarcely allowed her to be pretty ... But no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she hardly had a good feature in her face, than he began to find it was rendered uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes ... he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and pleasing; and in spite of his asserting that her manners were not those of the fashionable world, he was caught by their easy playfulness. Chapter 16 Quotes When Mr. Wickham walked into the room, Elizabeth felt that she had neither been seeing him before, nor thinking of him since, with the smallest degree of unreasonable admiration. The officers of the —shire were in general a very creditable, gentlemanlike set, and the best of them were of the present party; but Mr. Wickham was as far beyond them all in person, countenance, air, and walk. Chapter 19 Quotes Your portion is unhappily so small that it will in all likelihood undo the effects of your loveliness and amiable qualifications. As I must therefore conclude that you are not serious in your rejection of me, I shall choose to attribute it to your wish of increasing my love by suspense, according to the usual practice of elegant females. Chapter 33 Quotes If his own vanity, however, did not mislead him, he was the cause, his pride and caprice were the cause, of all that Jane had suffered, and still continued to suffer. He had ruined for a while every hope of happiness for the most affectionate, generous heart in the world; and no one could say how lasting an evil he might have inflicted. Chapter 33 Quotes If his own vanity, however, did not mislead him, he was the cause, his pride and caprice were the cause, of all that Jane had suffered, and still continued to suffer. He had ruined for a while every hope of happiness for the most affectionate, generous heart in the world; and no one could say how lasting an evil he might have inflicted. Chapter 34 Quotes "In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you." ... He spoke well; but there were feelings besides those of the heart to be detailed; and he was not more eloquent on the subject of tenderness than of pride. His sense of her inferiority—of its being a degradation—of the family obstacles which had always opposed to inclination, were dwelt on with a warmth which seemed due to the consequence he was wounding Chapter 36 Quotes I, who have prided myself on my discernment!—I, who have valued myself on my abilities! who have often disdained the generous candour of my sister, and gratified my vanity in useless or blameable mistrust.—How humiliating is this discovery!—Yet, how just a humiliation! ... Pleased with the preference of one, and offended by the neglect of the other, on the very beginning of our acquaintance, I have courted prepossession and ignorance, and driven reason away, where either were concerned. Till this moment, I never knew myself. Chapter 40 Quotes There certainly was some great mismanagement in the education of those two young men. One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it. Chapter 41 Quotes Our importance, our respectability in the world must be affected by the wild volatility, the assurance and disdain of all restraint which mark Lydia's character. Excuse me—for I must speak plainly. If you, my dear father, will not take the trouble of checking her exuberant spirits, and of teaching her that her present pursuits are not to be the business of her life, she will soon be beyond the reach of amendment. Chapter 43 Quotes Elizabeth was delighted. She had never seen a place for which nature had done more, or where natural beauty had been so little counteracted by an awkward taste. They were all of them warm in their admiration; and at that moment she felt that to be mistress of Pemberley might be something! Chapter 44 Quotes When she saw him thus seeking the acquaintance and courting the good opinion of people with whom any intercourse a few months ago would have been a disgrace—when she saw him thus civil, not only to herself, but to the very relations whom he had openly disdained ... the difference, the change was so great, and struck so forcibly on her mind, that she could hardly restrain her astonishment from being visible. Chapter 52 Quotes They owed the restoration of Lydia, her character, every thing, to him. Oh! how heartily did she grieve over every ungracious sensation she had ever encouraged, every saucy speech she had ever directed towards him. For herself she was humbled; but she was proud of him. Proud that in a cause of compassion and honour, he had been able to get the better of himself. Chapter 55 Quotes in spite of his being a lover, Elizabeth really believed all his expectations of felicity to be rationally founded, because they had for basis the excellent understanding, and super-excellent disposition of Jane, and a general similarity of feeling and taste between her and himself. Chapter 56 Quotes I have said no such thing. I am only resolved to act in that manner, which will, in my own opinion, constitute my happiness, without reference to you, or to any person so wholly unconnected with me. Chapter 57 Quotes That is what makes it amusing. Had they fixed on any other man it would have been nothing; but his perfect indifference, and your pointed dislike, make it so delightfully absurd! Chapter 58 Quotes What do I not owe you! You taught me a lesson, hard indeed at first, but most advantageous. By you, I was properly humbled. I came to you without a doubt of my reception. You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased. Chapter 59 Quotes I know that you could be neither happy nor respectable, unless you truly esteemed your husband; unless you looked up to him as a superior. Your lively talents would place you in the greatest danger in an unequal marriage ... My child, let me not have the grief of seeing you unable to respect your partner in life. Chapter 60 Quotes The fact is, that you were sick of civility, of deference, of officious attention. You were disgusted with the women who were always speaking, and looking, and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused, and interested you, because I was so unlike them. Related Characters: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet (speaker), Fitzwilliam Darcy Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Chapter 1 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...he'll write to give his consent for Bingley to marry any of his daughters, especially Elizabeth, whom he considers especially bright. (full context) Chapter 2 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...pretending to be uninterested in Bingley's arrival, only to then reveal his visit by asking Elizabeth when the next ball is scheduled and promising to introduce her to Bingley beforehand. (full context) Chapter 3 Pride Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth overhears Bingley tell Darcy that Jane is the most beautiful girl he's ever seen. Bingley... (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...Jane and convinced of Bingley's interest in her, and detests Darcy for his attitude about Elizabeth. (full context) Chapter 4 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Upstairs, Jane and Elizabeth talk more openly about their admiration for Bingley's looks, humor, and manners. Jane is reluctant... (full context) Chapter 5 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...neighbors: Sir William Lucas, Lady Lucas, and Charlotte, who is their eldest daughter and is Elizabeth's close friend. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...shifts to Darcy. Apparently he offended everyone who tried to speak with him. Charlotte consoles Elizabeth about Darcy's insult and wishes he would have agreed to a dance, but she adds... (full context) Chapter 6 Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Bingley's sisters soon start exchanging visits with Jane and Elizabeth. Elizabeth suspects they are only nice to Jane because of Bingley, whose admiration for Jane... (full context) Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Suspecting that Jane is falling in love, Elizabeth admires her sister's composure. She privately mentions it to Charlotte Lucas, who warns that women... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Meanwhile, as he spends more time with her, Darcy begins to notice Elizabeth's beauty and verve. At a party, Sir William Lucas tries to set up Darcy and... (full context) Chapter 7 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon The next morning, Jane sends Elizabeth a letter explaining that she caught a bad cold in the storm. Elizabeth walks the... (full context) Chapter 8 Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon During the conversation at dinner, Elizabeth accepts, but sees through, the empty concern that Mrs. Hurst and Caroline show for Jane.... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon When Elizabeth returns upstairs, Mrs. Hurst and Caroline criticize her looks, manners, and judgment. Mrs. Hurst says... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth returns downstairs in the evening, choosing to look through some books instead of joining in... (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon Class Theme Icon When Elizabeth leaves again, Caroline accuses her of using mean tactics to raise her own status. (full context) Chapter 9 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Elizabeth sends home a note requesting that her mother come and visit Jane. Mrs. Bennet arrives... (full context) Chapter 10 Marriage Theme Icon The next day, Elizabeth joins the evening party in the drawing room. Caroline looks on as Darcy tries to... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Elizabeth and Darcy get into an argument about Bingley's character. Darcy says that people should always... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon As Bingley's sisters sing at the piano, Elizabeth notices that she seems to fascinate Darcy. He asks her to dance and she playfully... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...jealous. The next day, she takes Darcy on a walk to tease him about marrying Elizabeth and about the awful family he would join. (full context) Chapter 11 Marriage Theme Icon ...pretends to be absorbed in reading a book. But she's soon bored and suggests to Elizabeth that they walk around the room together. This gets Darcy's attention. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Elizabeth advises Caroline that the best response is to laugh at what is ridiculous, which leads... (full context) Chapter 12 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth and Jane write to Mrs. Bennet to send their carriage to take them home. Mrs.... (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon Darcy is relieved: he is starting to worry that his attraction to Elizabeth might show, so he remains distant for the short remainder of her stay. (full context) Chapter 15 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...intentions, and she redirects his target from Jane, whom she hopes will marry Bingley, to Elizabeth. Mr. Collins obligingly agrees to shift his focus. (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon ...stop to chat. When Darcy and Wickham see each other, each man recoils in shock. Elizabeth wonders how they know each other. Mr. Collins and the Bennet sisters then go to... (full context) Chapter 16 Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon At dinner the next evening, Elizabeth is fascinated by Wickham's pleasant demeanor. The two of them easily fall into conversation and... (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon ...his father's love for Wickham, found a loophole and refused to give Wickham the money. Elizabeth is shocked and appalled. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Elizabeth asks about Darcy's sister, Georgiana. Wickham says that she is an accomplished young woman living... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Wickham, hearing Mr. Collins go on about Lady Catherine, informs Elizabeth that Lady Catherine is actually Darcy's aunt. He adds that Lady Catherine apparently hopes to... (full context) Chapter 17 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon The next day, Elizabeth tells Jane what she learned. Jane cannot believe that Darcy could be so blameworthy and... (full context) Marriage Theme Icon ...ball at Netherfield. Lydia and Kitty are overjoyed. Jane is excited to see Bingley, while Elizabeth looks forward to dancing with Wickham, though Mr. Collins requests that she give him the... (full context) Chapter 18 Prejudice Theme Icon Arriving at the ball at Netherfield, Elizabeth is disappointed to realize that Wickham is not at the party. Elizabeth blames Darcy for... (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon Darcy then asks Elizabeth for a dance. Caught by surprise, she accepts. Their conversation is short and abrupt. Darcy... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Afterwards, Caroline approaches Elizabeth about Wickham. He wasn't wronged by Darcy, she says. On the contrary, Wickham treated Darcy... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...be the last to leave. Realizing that her family's reputation is falling lower than ever, Elizabeth is mortified. (full context) Chapter 19 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon The next morning, Mr. Collins asks for a private meeting with Elizabeth. The rest of the family scrambles out of the room. When they are alone, Mr.... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth interrupts to decline, but Mr. Collins responds that women will typically reject an offer two... (full context) Chapter 20 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Mrs. Bennet rushes in to congratulate Mr. Collins but is shocked to hear that Elizabeth refused him. She runs to Mr. Bennet and demands that he convince his daughter to... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Mr. Bennet calmly calls in Elizabeth and, relishing the moment, tells her: "Your mother will never see you again if you... (full context) Chapter 21 Pride Theme Icon Mr. Collins prolongs his stay, acting coldly to Elizabeth and transferring his attention to Charlotte Lucas. (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon One morning, the Bennet sisters walk to Meryton and meet Wickham who confirms to Elizabeth that he was avoiding Darcy at the ball. He walks them home and Elizabeth introduces... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...Jane, who reads it in distress. Upstairs, Jane shares the contents of the letter with Elizabeth. Everyone at Netherfield has left for London, not to return for at least six months,... (full context) Chapter 22 Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Charlotte privately tells Elizabeth that she's engaged, and that all she wants is a comfortable home. Elizabeth is stunned... (full context) Chapter 23 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...his happy news. Mrs. Bennet and Lydia rudely exclaim that they cannot believe it, but Elizabeth intervenes to congratulate him on the match. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Mrs. Bennet fumes for days. She is angry with Elizabeth, the Lucases, and Charlotte, who will someday displace them at Longbourn. Her mood worsens when... (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon Meanwhile, Jane and Elizabeth start to worry because Bingley has not written. Jane writes to Caroline. Elizabeth believes that... (full context) Chapter 24 Prejudice Theme Icon ...is delighted with Darcy's sister, Georgiana. Jane tries to put on a brave face, telling Elizabeth that Bingley has not wronged her and refusing to believe that Caroline has ulterior motives. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Elizabeth is disgusted that Bingley could be so weak as to let his sisters and friend... (full context) Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Wickham occasionally visits and his pleasant company helps to dispel the gloom. Mr. Bennet encourages Elizabeth in her pursuit of Wickham. (full context) Chapter 25 Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...is a tradesman in London. Mrs. Gardiner is intelligent and extremely well-liked by Jane and Elizabeth. (full context) Family Theme Icon After listening sympathetically to Mrs. Bennet's outpouring of complaints, Mrs. Gardiner speaks with Elizabeth about Jane's situation. Elizabeth confirms that Jane was very much in love and swears that... (full context) Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...her recovery. While Mrs. Gardiner promises that Jane and Bingley are not likely to meet, Elizabeth secretly hopes that Jane's presence nearby will rekindle Bingley's affections. (full context) Chapter 26 Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Having noticed the warmth between Elizabeth and Wickham, Mrs. Gardiner cautions Elizabeth about making an unpromising match, warning that Wickham has... (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Mr. Collins returns for his marriage to Charlotte. Before they leave, Charlotte makes Elizabeth agree to come visit. Once she is gone, Charlotte writes to Elizabeth frequently about her... (full context) Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Around the same time, Wickham's interest shifts from Elizabeth to a young woman who recently inherited £10,000. Elizabeth finds she isn't affected much by... (full context) Chapter 27 Prejudice Theme Icon Sir William Lucas, his youngest daughter, and Elizabeth go to visit Charlotte, stopping along the way in London to check up on Jane.... (full context) Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Mrs. Gardiner also consoles Elizabeth about losing Wickham. She considers his shift in attention to a suddenly-rich woman to be... (full context) Chapter 28 Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth, Sir William Lucas, and his daughter arrive at the parsonage home of Mr. Collins and... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon If Charlotte is embarrassed by her husband, she hides it well. She takes Elizabeth on a tour of her neatly arranged home and Elizabeth realizes that Charlotte has made... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...sickly Miss De Bourgh causes a great commotion. Everyone is invited to dinner at Rosings. Elizabeth smirks that the sickly Miss De Bourgh will make the perfect wife for Darcy. (full context) Chapter 29 Pride Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Mr. Collins gloats as they prepare for the dinner. He condescendingly tells Elizabeth not to worry that her best dress is simple, because Lady Catherine "likes to have... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Class Theme Icon After lecturing Charlotte about how to run her household, Lady Catherine asks Elizabeth a series of invasive questions about her family, property, and upbringing. She disapproves of the... (full context) Chapter 30 Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Completely satisfied with his daughter's situation, Sir William Lucas soon departs. Elizabeth and Charlotte pass the time in her drawing room, conveniently separated from Mr. Collins's room.... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...his cousin. Upon their arrival, Mr. Collins brings them home for a visit. Darcy meets Elizabeth with his usual reserve. Conversation is sparse. Darcy seems uncomfortable when Elizabeth asks if he... (full context) Chapter 31 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Elizabeth and Colonel Fitzwilliam get along very well. During one visit to Rosings, he asks Elizabeth... (full context) Pride Theme Icon ...the ball by saying that he lacks the conversational warmth to introduce himself to strangers. Elizabeth counters with an analogy: if she practiced piano, she might become a tolerable musician. Darcy... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...be included in the conversation, and praises her daughter's musical potential—if only she were healthy. Elizabeth notices that Darcy is totally uninterested in Miss De Bourgh. (full context) Chapter 32 Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon The next morning, Elizabeth is surprised by a visit from Darcy. Conversation is awkward, and they struggle to avoid... (full context) Chapter 33 Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon When she goes on walks in the countryside near Rosings, Elizabeth keeps running into Darcy by chance. During one meeting, he questions her about Charlotte's happiness... (full context) Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon On another day, Elizabeth meets Colonel Fitzwilliam on a walk. As they talk, he tells her that as a... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...a story about how Darcy intervened before one of his friends made an "imprudent marriage." Elizabeth realizes that Fitzwilliam is unknowingly referencing a story about Bingley and Jane, and is appalled... (full context) Chapter 34 Marriage Theme Icon One day, while Charlotte and Mr. Collins go to visit Rosings, Elizabeth stays behind. The doorbell rings: expecting Colonel Fitzwilliam, Elizabeth is surprised to find Mr. Darcy. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...asks her to marry him. Darcy then explains how his affection outgrew his concerns about Elizabeth and her family's inferiority. Elizabeth grows angry, and firmly refuses his offer of marriage. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Darcy is astonished and demands an explanation. Elizabeth blasts him for insulting her, for ruining Jane's happiness forever, and for robbing Wickham of... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...to break up Bingley and Jane. He is sarcastic about Wickham's misfortunes. And he tells Elizabeth that he was only being honest about his complicated feelings for her. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Elizabeth assures Darcy that he's the last man she would ever marry. Darcy leaves angrily and... (full context) Chapter 35 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon The next day, Elizabeth takes a walk. She finds Darcy waiting for her. He gives her a letter of... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...Wickham away. To protect his sister's reputation, Darcy has kept everything a secret. He refers Elizabeth to Colonel Fitzwilliam to confirm the story. (full context) Chapter 36 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Elizabeth is stunned. At first, she doesn't believe any of this information because she thinks that... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Elizabeth is utterly ashamed. She had considered herself to be a discerning judge of character, but... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Elizabeth also rereads the part of the letter about Jane, and realizes that she can't blame... (full context) Marriage Theme Icon On returning to the parsonage house, Elizabeth learns that Darcy and Colonel Fitzwilliam had both visited to say good-bye. (full context) Chapter 37 Pride Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...leave the next morning. Lady Catherine, now bored, requests to see Mr. Collins, Charlotte, and Elizabeth again. Lady Catherine supposes that Elizabeth is melancholy for having to leave Rosings herself, but... (full context) Family Theme Icon Elizabeth keeps thinking about Darcy's letter. She decides that she respects Darcy but hopes never to... (full context) Chapter 38 Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon The next day, Mr. Collins delivers to Elizabeth his earnest and solemn farewell. He wishes Elizabeth the same kind of perfect happiness in... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Elizabeth arrives in London to visit with the Gardiners before returning to Longbourn with Jane. Though... (full context) Chapter 39 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon On their way to Longbourn, Elizabeth and Jane are met by Kitty and Lydia, who talk constantly about the soldiers. Lydia... (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon When they arrive home, Mr. Bennet is glad to see Elizabeth and Jane, Mrs. Bennet wants to hear about the latest fashions, and Kitty and Lydia... (full context) Chapter 40 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Later, Elizabeth tells Jane how Darcy proposed to her and also shares the part of Darcy's letter... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Elizabeth asks for Jane's advice: should they publicize Wickham's faults? They agree not to, for the... (full context) Chapter 41 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...an invitation from the wife of Colonel Forster to come with the regiment to Brighton. Elizabeth secretly asks Mr. Bennet to stop Lydia from going. Elizabeth urges him to realize how... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon In the days following, Elizabeth encounters Wickham at a social event. He blushes when she asks if he knows Colonel... (full context) Chapter 42 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Elizabeth reflects on her disappointment regarding her parents' marriage. After Mr. Bennet realized he married a... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Class Theme Icon In July, Elizabeth leaves on her summer holiday with Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner. They tour Derbyshire, which takes... (full context) Chapter 43 Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon At Pemberley, Elizabeth admires the estate's beauty. The house is lavish but tasteful, and Elizabeth imagines what it... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth and Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner are escorted around the rooms by a housekeeper who praises... (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Elizabeth notices a portrait of Darcy. As she stares at it, the housekeeper asks if she... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon As they walk, Darcy suddenly appears—he came home a day earlier than scheduled. Elizabeth is stunned and embarrassed, but Darcy is extremely polite to them all. He impresses Mr.... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...he is expecting guests the next day: Bingley and his sisters, and Georgiana. He asks Elizabeth if he can introduce his sister to her. Elizabeth accepts. The Gardiners, having heard so... (full context) Chapter 44 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon The next day, Elizabeth and the Gardiners are again surprised when Darcy shows up with Georgiana and Bingley for... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth is amazed at the change in Darcy. His pride has turned into tenderness. If he... (full context) Chapter 45 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon The next morning, Mr. Gardiner joins Bingley and Darcy to fish, and Elizabeth and Mrs. Gardiner visit the women at Pemberley. Caroline Bingley and Mrs. Hurst do not... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon When Darcy arrives, Caroline tries to embarrass Elizabeth by bringing up her connection with Wickham. The plan backfires: the name of Wickham mortifies... (full context) Chapter 46 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon At her inn, Elizabeth receives two awful letters from Jane. The first contains the shocking news that Lydia had... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth meets Darcy as she is running out the door and tells him the story. Elizabeth... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Looking serious, Darcy wishes he could offer help, and leaves. Elizabeth worries that this new disgrace to her family will put a final end to her... (full context) Chapter 47 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...lose his reputation with his regiment, so what else could he be after but marriage? Elizabeth assures them that Wickham is an awful person, capable of anything. (full context) Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Elizabeth and Jane dissect the situation. They are relieved that apparently Lydia did think she was... (full context) Chapter 48 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon ...Bennet and Mr. Gardiner search hotels in London to no avail. Mr. Gardiner suggests that Elizabeth ask for help from anyone related to Wickham. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon ...all attempts to find Wickham and Lydia fail, and Mr. Bennet returns home. He asks Elizabeth not to talk with him about Lydia, saying that he brought this on and only... (full context) Chapter 49 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...he says. The Bennets all agree that Lydia and Wickham must marry, but Jane and Elizabeth wonder how they can ever repay Mr. Gardiner. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Jane and Elizabeth share the news with Mrs. Bennet, who is overjoyed, instantly forgetting Lydia's disgrace. Asked about... (full context) Chapter 50 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon As Mrs. Bennet makes plans for Lydia's wedding, Elizabeth regrets having told Darcy about the scandal. She expects him to distance himself from her... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...one in Northern England and that Lydia hopes they can visit Longbourn on their way. Elizabeth and Jane convince Mr. Bennet, who wants nothing to do with Lydia or Wickham, to... (full context) Chapter 51 Marriage Theme Icon Yet during their ten-day visit, Elizabeth observes that Wickham doesn't entirely return Lydia's infatuation. She figures he ran away from creditors... (full context) Chapter 52 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Before Wickham leaves, Elizabeth encounters him on a walk. She reiterates that she knows his story but, resigned to... (full context) Chapter 53 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Darcy is not so congenial as he was at Pemberley, and Elizabeth doubts he has returned for her. Bingley, however, warms up to Jane as the initial... (full context) Chapter 54 Marriage Theme Icon ...Bingley decides to take the seat next to Jane—just as he used to. Watching them, Elizabeth is sure that Bingley will soon propose. (full context) Chapter 55 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...to shoot with Mr. Bennet. When Bingley comes inside, Mrs. Bennet again empties the room. Elizabeth returns from writing a letter and sees Bingley and Jane together by the fireside: he... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Overjoyed, Jane goes upstairs to tell her mother. Bingley and Elizabeth greet each other as brother and sister. Elizabeth knows that Bingley and Jane's mutual understanding... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Bingley tells Jane that he didn't know she was in London, but—to Elizabeth's relief—he leaves Darcy out of it. Jane realizes that Caroline and Mrs. Hurst had worked... (full context) Chapter 56 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...She says almost nothing to Mrs. Bennet, coolly inspecting the rooms and property, then asks Elizabeth to take a walk. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Lady Catherine gets to the point: she knows of Jane's engagement; she also knows that Elizabeth has tricked her nephew, Darcy, into proposing as well. Elizabeth denies having done any such... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Lady Catherine is shocked at Elizabeth's nerve. She says that Darcy was always intended for her daughter, Miss De Bourgh. And... (full context) Chapter 57 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon The next morning, Mr. Bennet calls in Elizabeth to congratulate her on her upcoming engagement. Elizabeth is stunned. Mr. Bennet shares with her... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Mr. Bennet thinks the rumor about Elizabeth and Darcy is hilarious because he is certain that Elizabeth hates Darcy and that Darcy... (full context) Chapter 58 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...days later, Darcy comes to Longbourn with Bingley. They all go for a walk and Elizabeth and Darcy soon find themselves alone. Elizabeth cannot contain her gratitude any longer for all... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...feelings for her have not changed since his rejected proposal, and asks about her feelings. Elizabeth confesses that her feelings have significantly changed. Darcy is overwhelmed with happiness. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Darcy explains that he started to hope after Lady Catherine informed him about Elizabeth's stubborn refusal to follow her commands. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Darcy regrets his first proposal to Elizabeth. He's been prideful since childhood and presumed that she would accept. He thanks Elizabeth for... (full context) Chapter 59 Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon That night, Elizabeth tells Jane everything. Jane thinks Elizabeth is joking. After all, doesn't Elizabeth hate Darcy? Elizabeth... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Mrs. Bennet is annoyed when Darcy returns the next day with Bingley. She apologizes to Elizabeth for the inconvenience of having to go on long walks with him. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Later Darcy visits Mr. Bennet in private to ask his consent to marry Elizabeth. Mr. Bennet calls in Elizabeth. He's stunned at the proposal, and wonders why Elizabeth would... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth tells her mother the news that night. After a moment of shock, Mrs. Bennet joyfully... (full context) Chapter 60 Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Elizabeth asks Darcy how he ever fell in love with her. He points to her liveliness... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth writes to tell Mrs. Gardiner of her engagement, as does Darcy to Lady Catherine. Mr.... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth tries to insulate Darcy from the foolishness of Mr. Collins, Sir William Lucas, and Mrs.... (full context) Chapter 61 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon A year later, Jane and Bingley move into an estate near Elizabeth and Darcy at Pemberley. Mrs. Bennet, extremely proud, visits them often. Mr. Bennet misses Elizabeth... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Lydia writes to Elizabeth with congratulations and asks if Darcy could pitch in some money for them. Elizabeth is... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Even though Caroline Bingley is disappointed by Darcy's marriage, she tries to make nice with Elizabeth. Georgiana and Elizabeth get along wonderfully, just as Darcy had hoped. Lady Catherine abuses Darcy... (full context) Elizabeth Bennet is the only character who is present throughout the novel. One way of looking at its structure is to note how she moves away from her home and family to meet new people in new settings – on a journey of self-knowledge. Elizabeth Bennet is the second eldest of the five Bennet sisters, who at the beginning of the novel are all unmarried. She is the heroine and events are frequently viewed from her perspective. In the novel, she: meets Darcy at a local ball and immediately takes a dislike to him rejects Mr Collins’s proposal of marriage, even though acceptance would guarantee financial security for herself and a future home for others in her family is immediately charmed by the handsome Wickham and believes his account of ill treatment by Darcy refuses Darcy’s first offer of marriage and accuses him of not being ‘gentleman-like’ (Vol. 2, Ch. 12, p. 160) begins to revise her opinions on reading Darcy’s letter of explanation; later visits Pemberley, Darcy’s estate, and finds she has been completely mistaken about him resists Lady Catherine’s attempts to bully her and marries Darcy on the same day as her sister Jane marries Darcy’s friend Bingley. TOP TIP It is often revealing to see a character from another character’s point of view. Elizabeth is the first of the Bennet sisters named in the novel. Her father offers to ‘throw in a good word’ for her (Vol. 1, Ch. 1, p. 2). Her mother is offended and describes her in negative terms – ‘not half so handsome as Jane, nor half so good-humoured as Lydia’ . Her father mentions her quality of ‘quickness’. Here we learn what different qualities the Bennet parents value as well as getting to know the novel’s heroine. As the central character of the novel it is through Elizabeth’s eyes that we see the vast majority of events. She is capable of making mistakes and wrong judgements but is intelligent, self-critical and capable of development. She is lively and observant as well as sensitive but restricted by her family and her neighbourhood and by the absence of opportunities for a young lady of her class. You may enjoy Elizabeth’s dialogue and admire her for being quick enough to defend herself while (usually) remaining polite. Elizabeth and the narrator often seem very close in their attitudes and Austen presents her sympathetically even when she is wrong. However strong Charlotte Lucas’s sensible arguments on marriage, it is Elizabeth’s romance that dominates the story. ELIZABETH BENNET EXAM FOCUS: WRITING ABOUT ELIZABETH Key point Evidence Elizabeth is less immediately attractive or less fun loving than some of her sisters, though she has a strong sense of humour. ‘she is not half so handsome as Jane, nor half so good humoured as Lydia’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 1, p. 2). ‘I dearly love a laugh’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 11, p. 46). When necessary, she is prepared to be unladylike and unconventional. ‘Elizabeth continued her walk alone, crossing field after field at a quick pace, jumping over stiles’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 7, p. 26). Darcy recognises that her expressive face reveals a lively mind. Her face ‘was rendered uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 6, p. 17). She has the intelligence and wisdom to gain Darcy’s respect. ‘You taught me a lesson […] By you I was properly humbled’ (Vol. 3, Ch. 16, p. 306). Elizabeth is observant. The reader often watches her watching others and shares her feelings. At the Netherfield ball ‘had her family made an agreement to expose themselves as much as they could […] it would have been impossible for them to play their parts with […] finer success’ (Vol. 3, Ch 18, p. 85). « PREVIOUS NEXT » ELIZABETH BENNET TOP TIP: WRITING ABOUT ELIZABETH AS HEROINE Make sure you explain how Austen places Elizabeth at the centre of the novel. Focus on key aspects of her character and where they are most clearly illustrated: her lively intelligence (Vol. 1, Ch. 11–12); her strong-mindedness (Vol. 1, Ch. 19; Vol. 2, Ch. 11; Vol. 3, Ch. 14); her readiness to acknowledge her misjudgements (Vol. 2, Ch. 13; Vol. 3, Ch. 1–2); her embarrassment about her family (Vol. 1, Ch. 18; Vol. 3, Ch. 4–6). Also make clear how often other characters and events are seen from Elizabeth’s point of view – which is often very close to the narrator’s (Vol. 1, Ch. 10; Vol. 2, Ch. 5). Why does she take against Darcy so quickly? Why is she so ready to believe Wickham? Why does she reject Darcy’s first proposal? (How often has she felt shame for her family before Darcy gives his point of view?) Character quotes Darcy admires E ‘For the liveliness  of your mind ...’ (Vol. 3, Ch. 18, p. 315) Elizabeth’s growth ‘Her sense of shame  was severe.’ (Vol. 2, Ch. 13, p. 173) How does Lady Catherine show her distaste when Elizabeth does not entirely agree with her? ‘... you give your opinion very decidedly for so young  a person.’ (Vol. 2, Ch. 7, p. 138) « PREVIOUS NEXT » In this portrait of a quiet country evening Whrn at Netherfield Jane Austen shows how people define themselves by what they do. For example, Mr Hurst goes to sleep and Mrs Hurst plays with her bracelets – thus revealing their empty minds. Elizabeth and Darcy show that they are well-matched by their quick, sparkling conversation. They are laughing and arguing at the same time A sense of humour is part of Elizabeth’s personality: ‘Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can’ (p. 46). Her half-laughing argument with Darcy might lead the reader to guess that she is more attracted to him than she realises. Why is Elizabeth so ready to believe Wickham’s story? Does this suggest her judgement of people is poor, or that Wickham is especially persuasive? SHOW/HIDE ANSWER Elizabeth is so ready to believe Wickham because he reinforces her determination to dislike Darcy and his story seems plausible. Elizabeth is charmed by Wickham and is attracted to him. Elizabeth is instantly attracted by Wickham’s good looks even though she knows nothing about him. He makes such a good impression on her that even talking about him is a ‘refreshment’. This is a good word to choose in the context of a ball and shows Jane Austen’s insight into Elizabeth’s infatuation. Unfortunately this favourable first impression has prejudiced her against Darcy. It may be understandable that she doesn’t listen to her friend Charlotte’s materialistic advice to avoid offending a man of Darcy’s ‘consequence’ or to Miss Bingley’s snobbish criticism of Wickham, but when Austen shows Elizabeth failing to listen to Jane, the reader begins to guess that she is making a mistake. Quote showing her negative attitude and blindness Later quite about her realizations But remember Elizabeth is young and inexperienced and hasn’t been guided in the world by her parents Austen would certainly have been aware of Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, published in 1792. We don’t know exactly what Austen thought about women’s rights but it is significant that Elizabeth, her heroine, demands to be taken seriously as a person, not dismissed or patronised because of her gender: ‘Do not consider me now as an elegant female […], but as a rational creature speaking the truth from her heart’ (p. 91). You could contrast the style of Mr Collins’s long-winded sentences with Elizabeth’s brief, forceful, unambiguous statements, such as ‘Can I speak plainer?’ (p. 91) Elizabeth at hugsfird Many of Jane Austen’s characters are one-dimensional – they lack the ability to develop or surprise us. However, both Elizabeth and Darcy are prepared to learn from their mistakes, extend their self-knowledge, and think again. This is appropriate for a hero and heroine. Here Elizabeth shows her essential quality of fair-mindedness as she begins to repair her friendship with Charlotte. She is perceptive enough to notice many of Charlotte’s survival strategies, such as encouraging Mr Collins to work in his garden to keep him out of the house, and she acknowledges that ‘it was all done very well’ (p. 131). Charlotte is strategically clever. She has married to gain ‘a comfortable home’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 22, p. 105) and now she is making the best of it. What does Elizabeth’s reaction to the sight of Miss de Bourgh tell us of her feelings towards Darcy? Are they quite what they seem? SHOW/HIDE ANSWER Elizabeth wants to dislike Darcy, so she appears to enjoy the prospect of him having a ‘sickly and cross’ wife in Miss de Bourgh. That her thoughts should instinctively turn to Darcy suggests she is more interested in him than she cares to admit. Rosings Park is the key setting for Volume 2 – the Lucases are overwhelmed, Elizabeth is not – further evidence for her strong character and ability to think for herself. When writing about the marriage theme, don’t forget Colonel Fitzwilliam. It is surprising to discover that he too will be marrying for money. His obvious admiration for Elizabeth may help convince the reader as well as Darcy how genuinely attractive and charming she is. Rosings Park is the key setting for Volume 2 – the Lucases are overwhelmed, Elizabeth is not – further evidence for her strong character and ability to think for herself. The letter is as important to Elizabeth’s development as a character as her refusal of his proposal was to Darcy. She becomes ashamed of her overhasty judgments and her prejudices. Wickham’s true nature is revealed and the themes of marriage and money emphasised yet again. The importance of correct social behaviour is mentioned and the question of how far an individual should be judged by the actions of their family. ‘She grew absolutely ashamed of herself. – Of neither Darcy nor Wickham could she think, without realising that she had been blind, partial, prejudiced, absurd’ (p. 172). This is Elizabeth’s moment of truth and she makes no excuses for herself. She is ‘absolutely ashamed’. Her capacity for honesty and her ability to change is what entitles her to be the heroine of this novel. TOP TIP Analyse Elizabeth’s speech beginning ‘How despicably have I acted!’ and ending ‘Till this moment I never knew myself’ (pp. 172–3). Underline the key words that show her change of heart. Notice the extraordinary string of exclamations. This is quite unlike her usual sentence style. She re-reads Darcy’s letter whenever she is alone and thinks about her own behaviour and the faults of her family. Elizabeth prepares to return home – ignoring Lady Catherine’s interference. Elizabeth attempts to persuade her father not to allow Lydia to go. Chapters 18–19 focus on some of the worst aspects of life at home with the Bennet family. These chapters, between Elizabeth’s encounters with Darcy in Kent and Derbyshire, serve as a domestic interlude. The fact that the most emotionally significant events take place away from Longbourn emphasises the independence of her inner life. Her eventual move to become mistress of Pemberley reflects how she has outgrown the confines of Longbourn. Elizabeth and Darcy Elizabeth receives letters from Jane saying that Lydia has eloped. Darcy arrives as she is reading them, is obviously upset but says very little except to express his concern and promise secrecy. Elizabeth is certain that this family disgrace will finally end her relationship with Darcy. She realises how much she ‘could have loved him’ (p. 228). Now all she wants is to get home to help Jane. Note Austen’s description of body language is not only connected with physical attraction. Here Elizabeth’s feelings make it impossible for her to speak but her pale colour and her ‘impetuous manner’ help Darcy to see that there is something badly wrong. Follow Austen’s description of Elizabeth’s movements on p. 226. E writes to mrs g Mrs Gardiner’s reply tells Elizabeth that it was Darcy who settled Wickham’s debts and therefore bribed him to marry Lydia. Darcy claims that this was because he should have revealed Wickham’s true character but Mrs Gardiner hints that love for Elizabeth was his real motive. The confrontation between Lady Catherine and Elizabeth is one of the most strongly written passages of dialogue in the novel. Lady Catherine, who prides herself on her ‘sincerity and frankness’ (p. 292), shows herself to be arrogant and insulting. Elizabeth defends herself by listening carefully to whatever Lady Catherine says and turning it back on her. For example when Lady Catherine asks whether Darcy has made Elizabeth an offer of marriage, Elizabeth is able to avoid giving a direct answer: ‘Your ladyship has declared it to be impossible’ (p. 293). However, when Lady Catherine says that Elizabeth will pollute ‘the shades of Pemberley’ Elizabeth has had enough: ‘You have insulted me, in every possible method’ (p. 296). Lady Catherine is so angry that she refuses to say goodbye: ‘I take no leave of you, Miss Bennet. I send no compliments to your mother. You deserve no such attention’ (p. 297). The rhythmical repetition of ‘no … no … no … ’ is intended to emphasise her anger but only reveals her lack of real power. It is well worth looking at the strong sentence rhythms in this chapter as well as examples of other literary devices such as alliteration, when Lady Catherine accuses Elizabeth of using her ‘arts and allurements’ (p. 293) to draw Darcy in. Though this is obviously rude, it is little different from the way Charlotte suggested earlier that Jane ought to behave to succeed in ‘fixing’ or to ‘secure’ Bingley (Vol. 1, Ch. 11, p. 16). The final affirmation of romance. Elizabeth, the heroine, has won love, marriage and money by her intelligence, honesty – and attractiveness. Her willingness to admit her mistakes and change has been her most outstanding quality. Darcy, the hero, has also admitted his mistakes and changed. The themes of manners, good class and proper pride (not snobbery) reach a conclusion here. Family issues remain. Jane and Mrs Bennet react in characteristic ways – Mr Bennet goes further. He truly loves Elizabeth and for once takes her happiness seriously: ‘My child, let me not have the grief of seeing you unable to respect your partner in life’ (p. 312). Ending Focus on how the events are not only romantic but comic. Fear and hope transform clear-headed Elizabeth into a blushing young woman, Elizabeth learns that Darcy admires her lively mind and that his reticence on recent visits to Longbourn was due to embarrassment. She admits to the same sensation and they rejoice in recalling how the ice was finally broken.

2

Darcy

Romantically inclined towards Elizabeth Bennet

proud, prejudiced, arrogant and sometimes rude

loyal

stubborn

introverted

handsome, intelligent, rich and socially well-connected

a kind master to his servants

socially awkward and shy

a loving brother

prepareed to admit that he has been wrong, and change

the owner of Pemberley, said to be one of the most beautiful estates in England

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fitzwilliam Darcy Rich, proud, secretive bachelor responsible for large estate and younger sister. Takes himself too seriously and is shocked by his attraction to Elizabeth. He gains self-knowledge and marries her. Fitzwilliam Darcy Character Analysis Bingley's closest friend, the brother of Georgiana, and the nephew of Lady Catherine de Bourgh. Darcy is very wealthy and a person of great integrity, but his extreme class-consciousness makes him appear vain and proud. He finds Elizabeth attractive, even ideal, but is clumsy in expressing his feelings and disdains her sometimes crass family. Elizabeth's harsh appraisal of him compels him to reassess his behavior and attitudes. Her intelligence and her disregard for mere social rank teaches him to see people more for who they are, rather than the status in to which they were born. Fitzwilliam Darcy Quotes in Pride and Prejudice The Pride and Prejudice quotes below are all either spoken by Fitzwilliam Darcy or refer to Fitzwilliam Darcy. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one: Pride Theme Icon ). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Classics edition of Pride and Prejudice published in 2002. Chapter 3 Quotes His character was decided. He was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and everybody hoped that he would never come there again. Darcy is waiting for Elizabeth on her morning walk in the park. He hands her a letter and leaves. This letter explains his actions concerning Bingley and Wickham. He admits that he thought Jane was indifferent to Bingley. He criticises members of Elizabeth’s family for their ‘want of propriety’ (p. 164) and then explains Wickham’s true nature and his attempt to elope with Darcy’s sister, Georgiana, when she was fifteen years old. Georgiana’s fortune is thirty thousand pounds. Elizabeth reads, re-reads and begins to rethink. Chapter 7 Quotes Darcy had at first scarcely allowed her to be pretty ... But no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she hardly had a good feature in her face, than he began to find it was rendered uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes ... he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and pleasing; and in spite of his asserting that her manners were not those of the fashionable world, he was caught by their easy playfulness. Chapter 33 Quotes If his own vanity, however, did not mislead him, he was the cause, his pride and caprice were the cause, of all that Jane had suffered, and still continued to suffer. He had ruined for a while every hope of happiness for the most affectionate, generous heart in the world; and no one could say how lasting an evil he might have inflicted. Chapter 34 Quotes "In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you." ... He spoke well; but there were feelings besides those of the heart to be detailed; and he was not more eloquent on the subject of tenderness than of pride. His sense of her inferiority—of its being a degradation—of the family obstacles which had always opposed to inclination, were dwelt on with a warmth which seemed due to the consequence he was wounding Chapter 40 Quotes There certainly was some great mismanagement in the education of those two young men. One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it. Chapter 43 Quotes Elizabeth was delighted. She had never seen a place for which nature had done more, or where natural beauty had been so little counteracted by an awkward taste. They were all of them warm in their admiration; and at that moment she felt that to be mistress of Pemberley might be something! Chapter 44 Quotes When she saw him thus seeking the acquaintance and courting the good opinion of people with whom any intercourse a few months ago would have been a disgrace—when she saw him thus civil, not only to herself, but to the very relations whom he had openly disdained ... the difference, the change was so great, and struck so forcibly on her mind, that she could hardly restrain her astonishment from being visible. Related Characters: Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet, Fitzwilliam Darcy Chapter 52 Quotes They owed the restoration of Lydia, her character, every thing, to him. Oh! how heartily did she grieve over every ungracious sensation she had ever encouraged, every saucy speech she had ever directed towards him. For herself she was humbled; but she was proud of him. Proud that in a cause of compassion and honour, he had been able to get the better of himself. Chapter 57 Quotes That is what makes it amusing. Had they fixed on any other man it would have been nothing; but his perfect indifference, and your pointed dislike, make it so delightfully absurd! Chapter 58 Quotes What do I not owe you! You taught me a lesson, hard indeed at first, but most advantageous. By you, I was properly humbled. I came to you without a doubt of my reception. You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased. Chapter 60 Quotes The fact is, that you were sick of civility, of deference, of officious attention. You were disgusted with the women who were always speaking, and looking, and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused, and interested you, because I was so unlike them. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance. Chapter 3 Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...with his sister Mrs. Hurst and her husband, his youngest sister Caroline, and his friend Darcy for the upcoming ball. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon The ball takes place at Meryton, where the locals gossip about the newcomers. Darcy is handsome but proud and aloof. Bingley makes friends with everyone, dancing every dance, including... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth overhears Bingley tell Darcy that Jane is the most beautiful girl he's ever seen. Bingley demands that Darcy find... (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...details. She is excited for Jane and convinced of Bingley's interest in her, and detests Darcy for his attitude about Elizabeth. (full context) Chapter 4 Prejudice Theme Icon Bingley and Darcy's friendship is explained as a meeting of opposites: Bingley's easy manner and Darcy's more stringent... (full context) Chapter 5 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Everyone agrees that Bingley liked Jane. The conversation quickly shifts to Darcy. Apparently he offended everyone who tried to speak with him. Charlotte consoles Elizabeth about Darcy's... (full context) Chapter 6 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Meanwhile, as he spends more time with her, Darcy begins to notice Elizabeth's beauty and verve. At a party, Sir William Lucas tries to... (full context) Chapter 7 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...Netherfield to care for Jane, arriving dirty and tired. Caroline later mocks Elizabeth's appearance, but Darcy is moved by the glow of exercise on Elizabeth's face. Jane's condition soon worsens and... (full context) Chapter 8 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...family situation—having few connections and no money—will block her hopes of making a good match. Darcy agrees. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...look through some books instead of joining in cards. Caroline, who has been absorbed with Darcy, asks him about his estate, Pemberley, and about his sister, who she deems a very... (full context) Chapter 9 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...Jane's status, tries to impress Bingley about her family and their situation in the country. Darcy suggests that one finds more variety of character in town than in the country, but... (full context) Chapter 10 Marriage Theme Icon ...next day, Elizabeth joins the evening party in the drawing room. Caroline looks on as Darcy tries to write a letter. Trying to flatter him, she offers empty compliments about his... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Elizabeth and Darcy get into an argument about Bingley's character. Darcy says that people should always follow their... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon As Bingley's sisters sing at the piano, Elizabeth notices that she seems to fascinate Darcy. He asks her to dance and she playfully refuses. Still, Darcy is bewitched: he thinks... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Caroline is increasingly jealous. The next day, she takes Darcy on a walk to tease him about marrying Elizabeth and about the awful family he... (full context) Chapter 11 Marriage Theme Icon ...join the group. Bingley dotes on her and talks to no one else. Caroline, watching Darcy read, pretends to be absorbed in reading a book. But she's soon bored and suggests... (full context) Marriage Theme Icon Caroline invites Darcy to join them, but he says he doesn't want to interfere: they must either be... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon ...to laugh at what is ridiculous, which leads to a discussion of the aspects of Darcy's character that might be ridiculed. Darcy claims that his main fault is that "my good... (full context) Chapter 12 Prejudice Theme Icon Darcy is relieved: he is starting to worry that his attraction to Elizabeth might show, so... (full context) Chapter 15 Prejudice Theme Icon Just then, Bingley and Darcy come up the street and stop to chat. When Darcy and Wickham see each other,... (full context) Chapter 16 Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon ...pleasant demeanor. The two of them easily fall into conversation and Wickham soon asks about Darcy. Elizabeth says he is widely disliked for his pride. Wickham withholds an opinion out of... (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Wickham explains that he was the son of one of Darcy's father's employees, and that he and Darcy grew up together. Darcy's father died and left... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...hearing Mr. Collins go on about Lady Catherine, informs Elizabeth that Lady Catherine is actually Darcy's aunt. He adds that Lady Catherine apparently hopes to marry Darcy to her daughter. (full context) Chapter 17 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon The next day, Elizabeth tells Jane what she learned. Jane cannot believe that Darcy could be so blameworthy and that there must be other parts to the story. But... (full context) Chapter 18 Prejudice Theme Icon ...Netherfield, Elizabeth is disappointed to realize that Wickham is not at the party. Elizabeth blames Darcy for Wickham's absence. She endures two dreadful dances with Mr. Collins. (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon Darcy then asks Elizabeth for a dance. Caught by surprise, she accepts. Their conversation is short... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Afterwards, Caroline approaches Elizabeth about Wickham. He wasn't wronged by Darcy, she says. On the contrary, Wickham treated Darcy terribly and now Darcy has nothing to... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon The rest of the evening is a disaster. Mr. Collins rudely introduces himself to Darcy and later pontificates to the whole assembly. Darcy overhears Mrs. Bennet talking about Jane and... (full context) Chapter 21 Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon ...sisters walk to Meryton and meet Wickham who confirms to Elizabeth that he was avoiding Darcy at the ball. He walks them home and Elizabeth introduces him to her parents. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...ever. Caroline ends the letter by saying that she will be delighted to see Georgiana Darcy again, who she hopes will become Bingley's wife. Jane is despondent and refuses to believe... (full context) Chapter 23 Prejudice Theme Icon ...to Caroline. Elizabeth believes that Bingley truly cares for Jane, but fears that his sisters, Darcy, and London will prove stronger than his love for Jane. (full context) Chapter 24 Prejudice Theme Icon Caroline writes back: Bingley will certainly be gone for awhile and everyone is delighted with Darcy's sister, Georgiana. Jane tries to put on a brave face, telling Elizabeth that Bingley has... (full context) Chapter 28 Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...Rosings. Elizabeth smirks that the sickly Miss De Bourgh will make the perfect wife for Darcy. (full context) Chapter 30 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Lady Catherine has arranged a visit from her nephews: Darcy (her favorite) and Colonel Fitzwilliam, his cousin. Upon their arrival, Mr. Collins brings them home... (full context) Chapter 31 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon ...along very well. During one visit to Rosings, he asks Elizabeth to play the piano. Darcy leaves his aunt to watch, and Elizabeth playfully accuses him of spreading her poor musical... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Darcy tries to excuse his behavior at the ball by saying that he lacks the conversational... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...the conversation, and praises her daughter's musical potential—if only she were healthy. Elizabeth notices that Darcy is totally uninterested in Miss De Bourgh. (full context) Chapter 32 Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon The next morning, Elizabeth is surprised by a visit from Darcy. Conversation is awkward, and they struggle to avoid awkward silences. Elizabeth asks Darcy about suddenly... (full context) Chapter 33 Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon When she goes on walks in the countryside near Rosings, Elizabeth keeps running into Darcy by chance. During one meeting, he questions her about Charlotte's happiness and about her own... (full context) Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...As they talk, he tells her that as a younger son, he has concerns that Darcy does not have: for instance, about having to marry for money. Elizabeth blushes. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon During the same conversation, Colonel Fitzwilliam relates a story about how Darcy intervened before one of his friends made an "imprudent marriage." Elizabeth realizes that Fitzwilliam is... (full context) Chapter 34 Marriage Theme Icon ...Elizabeth stays behind. The doorbell rings: expecting Colonel Fitzwilliam, Elizabeth is surprised to find Mr. Darcy. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...shock when he passionately confesses his love for her and asks her to marry him. Darcy then explains how his affection outgrew his concerns about Elizabeth and her family's inferiority. Elizabeth... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Darcy is astonished and demands an explanation. Elizabeth blasts him for insulting her, for ruining Jane's... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Darcy stands by his decision to break up Bingley and Jane. He is sarcastic about Wickham's... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Elizabeth assures Darcy that he's the last man she would ever marry. Darcy leaves angrily and Elizabeth breaks... (full context) Chapter 35 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon The next day, Elizabeth takes a walk. She finds Darcy waiting for her. He gives her a letter of explanation. In the letter, Darcy answers... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Regarding Wickham, Darcy says that after Darcy's father died, Wickham resigned his opportunity with the church in exchange... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Years passed. Wickham saw an opportunity with Darcy's sister Georgiana, who was both rich and, at age 15, naÏve. Wickham charmed her into... (full context) Chapter 36 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon ...is stunned. At first, she doesn't believe any of this information because she thinks that Darcy's tone in the letter seems unrepentant and haughty. But, upon rereading the letter, she starts... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...also rereads the part of the letter about Jane, and realizes that she can't blame Darcy for intervening: Jane was reserved, as Charlotte had pointed out; and she must admit that... (full context) Marriage Theme Icon On returning to the parsonage house, Elizabeth learns that Darcy and Colonel Fitzwilliam had both visited to say good-bye. (full context) Chapter 37 Pride Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Darcy and Colonel Fitzwilliam leave the next morning. Lady Catherine, now bored, requests to see Mr.... (full context) Family Theme Icon Elizabeth keeps thinking about Darcy's letter. She decides that she respects Darcy but hopes never to see him again. (full context) Chapter 40 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Later, Elizabeth tells Jane how Darcy proposed to her and also shares the part of Darcy's letter about Wickham. Elizabeth says... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon ...Jane's advice: should they publicize Wickham's faults? They agree not to, for the sake of Darcy and his sister. Besides, no one would believe that Darcy is actually the good guy.... (full context) Chapter 41 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon ...event. He blushes when she asks if he knows Colonel Fitzwilliam. When Wickham asks how Darcy is doing, Elizabeth responds that she understands Darcy better now. Wickham gets the point, and... (full context) Chapter 43 Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...Elizabeth imagines what it would have been like to be mistress of the place as Darcy's wife. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner are escorted around the rooms by a housekeeper who praises Mr. Darcy as a kind and generous man: good to his servants, his tenants, and especially his... (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Elizabeth notices a portrait of Darcy. As she stares at it, the housekeeper asks if she thinks Darcy is handsome. Elizabeth... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon As they walk, Darcy suddenly appears—he came home a day earlier than scheduled. Elizabeth is stunned and embarrassed, but... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Darcy says he is expecting guests the next day: Bingley and his sisters, and Georgiana. He... (full context) Chapter 44 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon The next day, Elizabeth and the Gardiners are again surprised when Darcy shows up with Georgiana and Bingley for a visit. The Gardiners note Darcy's eagerness and... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth is amazed at the change in Darcy. His pride has turned into tenderness. If he was embarrassed by Elizabeth's relations before, Darcy... (full context) Chapter 45 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon The next morning, Mr. Gardiner joins Bingley and Darcy to fish, and Elizabeth and Mrs. Gardiner visit the women at Pemberley. Caroline Bingley and... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon When Darcy arrives, Caroline tries to embarrass Elizabeth by bringing up her connection with Wickham. The plan... (full context) Chapter 46 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth meets Darcy as she is running out the door and tells him the story. Elizabeth blames herself... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Looking serious, Darcy wishes he could offer help, and leaves. Elizabeth worries that this new disgrace to her... (full context) Chapter 50 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon As Mrs. Bennet makes plans for Lydia's wedding, Elizabeth regrets having told Darcy about the scandal. She expects him to distance himself from her now that Wickham will... (full context) Chapter 51 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon While gloating about the details of her wedding, Lydia reveals to Elizabeth that Darcy attended the ceremony. Lydia quickly apologizes: it was supposed to be a secret. Elizabeth burns... (full context) Chapter 52 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Mrs. Gardiner sends a long reply detailing how Darcy went to London, tracked down Wickham and stopped him from abandoning Lydia and escaping to... (full context) Chapter 53 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Not long after, however, Bingley and Darcy visit the Bennets. Mrs. Bennet gives a warm welcome to Bingley and almost none to... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Darcy is not so congenial as he was at Pemberley, and Elizabeth doubts he has returned... (full context) Chapter 54 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Darcy, however, sits at the far end of the table from Elizabeth, next to Mrs. Bennet,... (full context) Chapter 55 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Bingley tells Jane that he didn't know she was in London, but—to Elizabeth's relief—he leaves Darcy out of it. Jane realizes that Caroline and Mrs. Hurst had worked against her, but... (full context) Chapter 56 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...point: she knows of Jane's engagement; she also knows that Elizabeth has tricked her nephew, Darcy, into proposing as well. Elizabeth denies having done any such thing. Lady Catherine demands that... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Lady Catherine is shocked at Elizabeth's nerve. She says that Darcy was always intended for her daughter, Miss De Bourgh. And that Darcy's connection to the... (full context) Chapter 57 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Mr. Bennet thinks the rumor about Elizabeth and Darcy is hilarious because he is certain that Elizabeth hates Darcy and that Darcy is indifferent... (full context) Chapter 58 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Only days later, Darcy comes to Longbourn with Bingley. They all go for a walk and Elizabeth and Darcy... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Darcy says his feelings for her have not changed since his rejected proposal, and asks about... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Darcy explains that he started to hope after Lady Catherine informed him about Elizabeth's stubborn refusal... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Darcy regrets his first proposal to Elizabeth. He's been prideful since childhood and presumed that she... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Darcy explains that he told Bingley the truth about Jane and advised him to return to... (full context) Chapter 59 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Mrs. Bennet is annoyed when Darcy returns the next day with Bingley. She apologizes to Elizabeth for the inconvenience of having... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Later Darcy visits Mr. Bennet in private to ask his consent to marry Elizabeth. Mr. Bennet calls... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...genteel and rich—even richer than Jane! Elizabeth fears that her mother will continue to embarrass Darcy, but Mrs. Bennet, because she's intimidated, treats him with uncharacteristic respect. (full context) Chapter 60 Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Elizabeth asks Darcy how he ever fell in love with her. He points to her liveliness of mind,... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth writes to tell Mrs. Gardiner of her engagement, as does Darcy to Lady Catherine. Mr. Bennet writes to Mr. Collins who, along with Charlotte, soon return... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth tries to insulate Darcy from the foolishness of Mr. Collins, Sir William Lucas, and Mrs. Philips, but Darcy tolerates... (full context) Chapter 61 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon A year later, Jane and Bingley move into an estate near Elizabeth and Darcy at Pemberley. Mrs. Bennet, extremely proud, visits them often. Mr. Bennet misses Elizabeth and visits... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Lydia writes to Elizabeth with congratulations and asks if Darcy could pitch in some money for them. Elizabeth is annoyed, but sends them the money... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Even though Caroline Bingley is disappointed by Darcy's marriage, she tries to make nice with Elizabeth. Georgiana and Elizabeth get along wonderfully, just... (full context) Related Characters: Fitzwilliam Darcy (speaker), Elizabeth (Eliza, Lizzy) Bennet Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Page Number: 349 Cite Explanation and Analysis: Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Page Number: 251 Cite Explanation and Analysis: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum. Unlock with LitCharts A+ Mr Darcy is a rich landowner who has a higher social status than any other character in the novel. He is the nephew of Lady Catherine de Bourgh and is the novel’s hero. In the novel, he: first appears with his friend Bingley at a public ball in Meryton becomes attracted to Elizabeth while she is visiting Jane at Netherfield reappears when Elizabeth is visiting her friend Charlotte in Kent; asks Elizabeth to marry him but she rejects him welcomes Elizabeth and the Gardiners at his country estate, Pemberley rescues Lydia from disgrace by arranging a regimental post for Wickham and paying his debts eventually returns to Longbourn, proposes once again and is accepted. MR FITZWILLIAM DARCY EXAM FOCUS: WRITING ABOUT MR DARCY Key point Evidence Darcy commands attention with his good looks, distinguished manner and wealth. He ‘drew the attention of the room by his fine, tall person, handsome features, noble mien; and the report […] of his having ten thousand a year’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 3, p. 7). His silence and superior manner can give offence. ‘the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 3, p. 7). He is strongly attracted to Elizabeth but aware of the difference in their social status. Elizabeth ‘attracted him more than he liked’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 12, p. 48). His housekeeper, Mrs Reynolds, gives a different perspective on her employer. ‘He is the best landlord, and the best master […] that ever lived […] Some people call him proud; but I am sure I never saw any thing of it’ (Vol. 3, Ch. 1, p. 204). Darcy is self-controlled and often silent. Austen frequently uses description of body language to suggest his hidden feelings. ‘His complexion became pale with anger, and the disturbance of his mind was visible in every feature’ (Vol. 2, Ch. 11, p. 158). Think about Darcy as a romantic hero (if you know Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë you could compare him to Mr Rochester). He is a man of the world and seemingly unobtainable for a small-town girl – ‘To be mistress of Pemberley might be something!’ (Vol. 3, Ch. 1, p. 200). Darcy is conscious of his social standing and appears self-assured, which can be interpreted as arrogant and unfriendly (Vol. 2, Ch. 8, pp. 145–6). He is quick witted enough to put down those who should know better – though he is usually self-controlled unless pushed too far (e.g. by Miss Bingley, Vol. 3, Ch. 3, p. 222). There is a hidden side to Darcy, revealed when Elizabeth visits Pemberley (Vol. 3, Ch. 1–3) and when he is confident enough to reveal his true feelings (Vol. 3, Ch. 16). He possesses a strong sense of duty, as shown in his protective care of his sister, his good management of his estate (Vol. 3, Ch. 1) and in his steps to rescue the situation of Lydia and Wickham (Mrs Gardiner’s letter, Vol. 3, Ch. 10, pp. 264–8). Ensure you understand how marriage is inextricably linked to money. This is made clear from the novel’s opening sentence onwards: ‘It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 1, p. 1). Darcy’s first, unsuccessful proposal is anything but cool: ‘My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you’ (Vol. 2, Ch. 11, p. 156). Austen successfully presents Darcy as a man of strong feelings (ardent) who can usually keep his passion in check (repressed). It makes a clever contrast with ‘the fire and independence’ of Mr Collins’s character – which is an example of the narrator using sarcasm (Vol. 1, Ch. 22, p. 101). Darcy’s growth What does Darcy say that Elizabeth has done for him? ‘You taught me a lesson ... By you, I was properly humbled  .’ (Vol. 3, Ch. 16, p. 306) Mr Darcy’s housekeeper ‘He is the best landlord, and the best master  ...’ (Vol. 3, Ch. 1, p. 204) « PREVIOUS NEXT » I’m Notice how Austen achieves most of her effects by her careful choice of words (diction), her use of dialogue and her narrator’s comments. She also positions herself inside a character’s head and uses words to convey their thoughts – here Mr Darcy is shown re-considering his opinion of Elizabeth (p. 17). In addition Austen uses body language when characters are not being rational. In this chapter Darcy is ‘caught’ by the ‘easy playfulness’ (p. 18) of Elizabeth’s manners and is drawn towards her, almost against his will. Such movements are often Austen’s means of suggesting unconscious sexual attraction. Criticizing e after walk. Petty coat reveals petty behaviour Caroline gets the opposite of what she’d hoped for. Austen shows up such characters who are petty and false as ultimately failing Caroline does not ‘get her man’ Darcy quite artifice as abhorrent Contrast [Incident later - never seen a person so changed - brown Darcy - suntan Etc He gives the response that Elizabeth Darcy feels ‘bewitched’ by Elizabeth but assumes he will not let the relationship develop any further because of ‘the inferiority of her connections’ (p. 42). “In real danger ...” Chapter 18 Chapter 18 This is a crucial chapter in the development of the plot. In it, Darcy notices the seriousness of Bingley’s feelings for Jane but does not realise how deeply Jane returns this love. He has the opportunity to tell Elizabeth about wickhsm Darcy has the opportunity to tell Elizabeth his side of the Wickham story but is far too reserved and private to do so Proposal 1 Austen has been working towards this moment ever since Darcy began to notice Elizabeth’s ‘fine eyes’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 6, p. 21). She has frequently presented him as unnaturally silent (for example on several of his visits to the Parsonage) and has expressed his inner conflict through his movements. Here he sits down, stands up, walks round the room, stays silent, then obviously makes up his mind. ‘He came towards her in an agitated manner, and thus began, “In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you”’ (p. 156). If you compare this to Mr Collins claiming to be ‘run away with his feelings’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 19, p. 88) you will see how effectively Austen has established Darcy as a genuinely passionate man. ‘Ardently’ is a word that has connotations of fire and burning. It contrasts with Elizabeth’s ‘cold’ civility at this point (p. 156). Unfortunately he also speaks with ‘warmth’ (p. 157) about his contempt for her family. Throughout Pride and Prejudice Darcy develops more than any other character and this is the halfway stage in his journey. What is suggested by the fact that Darcy and his cousin visit Hunsford so soon after their arrival at Rosings? SHOW/HIDE ANSWER Darcy has no great affection for his aunt, so his true reason for his visit to Hunsford must be to see Elizabeth. His early arrival suggests how important it is for him. When Charlotte says, ‘My dear Eliza he must be in love with you, or he would never have called on us in this familiar way’ (p. 149), she is giving the reader a hint. Imagine either that you are in the parlour at Hunsford Parsonage or the drawing room at Rosings and are observing Mr Darcy. What might make you guess he is in love with Elizabeth? Do you have any suspicion that Elizabeth could ever feel the same about him The housekeeper’s testimony sheds new light on Darcy’s character. His behaviour to Elizabeth and members of her family immediately suggests how much he has changed since their last encounter. Pemberley is presented as an ideal setting. The housekeeper’s testimony sheds new light on Darcy’s character. His behaviour to Elizabeth and members of her family immediately suggests how much he has changed since their last encounter. Pemberley is presented as an ideal setting. The almost complete absence of characters from different social classes in Pride and Prejudice makes Austen’s decision to use the housekeeper significant. ‘I have never had a cross word from him in my life, and I’ve known him since he was four years old,’ she says (p. 203). Her list of Darcy’s good qualities includes his devotion to his sister, generosity to the poor and excellence as a master and landlord. The final affirmation of romance. Elizabeth, the heroine, has won love, marriage and money by her intelligence, honesty – and attractiveness. Her willingness to admit her mistakes and change has been her most outstanding quality. Darcy, the hero, has also admitted his mistakes and changed. The themes of manners, good class and proper pride (not snobbery) reach a conclusion here. Family issues remain. Jane and Mrs Bennet react in characteristic ways – Mr Bennet goes further. He truly loves Elizabeth and for once takes her happiness seriously: ‘My child, let me not have the grief of seeing you unable to respect your partner in life’ (p. 312). I iwhile Darcy becomes a tongue-tied suitor. Elizabeth learns that Darcy admires her lively mind and that his reticence on recent visits to Longbourn was due to embarrassment. She admits to the same sensation and they rejoice in recalling how the ice was finally broken.

3

Jane

The eldest adughet of mr and mrs bennet

romatnically inclined towards mr Bingley

calm and collected

someone who wants the best for everyone and sees the best in everyone

the most beautiful of the Bennet sisters

incapable of nastiness and deception

very close to Elizabeth

someone who does not easitly show her feelings

 

 

 

Jane Bennet Sweet-natured eldest daughter, loving sister. She is ‘candid’ – thinks well of people and judges them less hastily than Elizabeth. She hides her private feelings too well for her own good. The oldest of the Bennet sisters, Jane seems almost too good to be true: beautiful, sweet-tempered, and modest. Her sole fault is that she refuses to think badly of anyone. She always looks on the bright side and is quick to defend someone when Elizabeth suspects them of having shortcomings. Jane Bennet Quotes in Pride and Prejudice The Pride and Prejudice quotes below are all either spoken by Jane Bennet or refer to Jane Bennet. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one: Pride Theme Icon ). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Classics edition of Pride and Prejudice published in 2002. Chapter 4 Quotes Oh! you are a great deal too apt, you know, to like people in general. You never see a fault in anybody. All the world are good and agreeable in your eyes. I never heard you speak ill of a human being in your life. Chapter 33 Quotes If his own vanity, however, did not mislead him, he was the cause, his pride and caprice were the cause, of all that Jane had suffered, and still continued to suffer. He had ruined for a while every hope of happiness for the most affectionate, generous heart in the world; and no one could say how lasting an evil he might have inflicted. Chapter 55 Quotes in spite of his being a lover, Elizabeth really believed all his expectations of felicity to be rationally founded, because they had for basis the excellent understanding, and super-excellent disposition of Jane, and a general similarity of feeling and taste between her and himself. Chapter 3 ...but proud and aloof. Bingley makes friends with everyone, dancing every dance, including several with Jane, which makes the Bennets very happy. (full context) Elizabeth overhears Bingley tell Darcy that Jane is the most beautiful girl he's ever seen. Bingley demands that Darcy find someone to... (full context) ...home, Mrs. Bennet regales her husband with an abundance of details. She is excited for Jane and convinced of Bingley's interest in her, and detests Darcy for his attitude about Elizabeth. (full context) Chapter 4 Upstairs, Jane and Elizabeth talk more openly about their admiration for Bingley's looks, humor, and manners. Jane... (full context) ...aloof that he offends people. After the ball, Bingley was delighted with the locals (especially Jane) but Darcy considered them plain and uninteresting. (full context) Chapter 5 Everyone agrees that Bingley liked Jane. The conversation quickly shifts to Darcy. Apparently he offended everyone who tried to speak with... (full context) Chapter 6 Bingley's sisters soon start exchanging visits with Jane and Elizabeth. Elizabeth suspects they are only nice to Jane because of Bingley, whose admiration... (full context) Suspecting that Jane is falling in love, Elizabeth admires her sister's composure. She privately mentions it to Charlotte... (full context) Chapter 7 A letter arrives to Jane from Caroline Bingley inviting her to visit. Mrs. Bennet schemes to send Jane on horseback,... (full context) The next morning, Jane sends Elizabeth a letter explaining that she caught a bad cold in the storm. Elizabeth... (full context) Chapter 8 ...Elizabeth accepts, but sees through, the empty concern that Mrs. Hurst and Caroline show for Jane. Still, she is grateful to Bingley for his sincere interest in Jane. (full context) ...and Caroline criticize her looks, manners, and judgment. Mrs. Hurst says she does really like Jane, but that her family situation—having few connections and no money—will block her hopes of making... (full context) Chapter 9 Elizabeth sends home a note requesting that her mother come and visit Jane. Mrs. Bennet arrives with Lydia and, not wishing Jane to leave Bingley's company, declares that... (full context) In conversation, Mrs. Bennet, seeking to raise Jane's status, tries to impress Bingley about her family and their situation in the country. Darcy... (full context) ...to give a ball at Netherfield. Bingley says he hasn't forgotten but will wait until Jane recovers. (full context) Chapter 11 That evening, Jane is well enough to join the group. Bingley dotes on her and talks to no... (full context) Chapter 12 Elizabeth and Jane write to Mrs. Bennet to send their carriage to take them home. Mrs. Bennet, still... (full context) Chapter 15 ...their inheritance. He privately tells Mrs. Bennet his intentions, and she redirects his target from Jane, whom she hopes will marry Bingley, to Elizabeth. Mr. Collins obligingly agrees to shift his... (full context) Chapter 17 The next day, Elizabeth tells Jane what she learned. Jane cannot believe that Darcy could be so blameworthy and that there... (full context) ...visit Longbourn with an invitation to a ball at Netherfield. Lydia and Kitty are overjoyed. Jane is excited to see Bingley, while Elizabeth looks forward to dancing with Wickham, though Mr.... (full context) Chapter 18 ...the contrary, Wickham treated Darcy terribly and now Darcy has nothing to do with him. Jane, who has been speaking to Bingley, tells Elizabeth the same story: the fault, whatever it... (full context) ...to Darcy and later pontificates to the whole assembly. Darcy overhears Mrs. Bennet talking about Jane and Bingley like they're already married. Mary insists on playing the piano, and does so... (full context) Chapter 20 Outraged, Mrs. Bennet tries to find support from anyone else: Jane, who keeps out of it, and then Charlotte Lucas, who has just arrived to visit.... (full context) Chapter 21 A letter from Caroline Bingley arrives for Jane, who reads it in distress. Upstairs, Jane shares the contents of the letter with Elizabeth.... (full context) Chapter 23 Meanwhile, Jane and Elizabeth start to worry because Bingley has not written. Jane writes to Caroline. Elizabeth... (full context) Chapter 24 ...Bingley will certainly be gone for awhile and everyone is delighted with Darcy's sister, Georgiana. Jane tries to put on a brave face, telling Elizabeth that Bingley has not wronged her... (full context) ...friend determine his affections. She cites him and Charlotte as examples of human inconsistency. But Jane tells Elizabeth she judges them too harshly. (full context) Chapter 25 ...Mr. Gardiner is a tradesman in London. Mrs. Gardiner is intelligent and extremely well-liked by Jane and Elizabeth. (full context) After listening sympathetically to Mrs. Bennet's outpouring of complaints, Mrs. Gardiner speaks with Elizabeth about Jane's situation. Elizabeth confirms that Jane was very much in love and swears that Bingley's departure... (full context) Mrs. Gardiner proposes that Jane come stay with them in London to help her recovery. While Mrs. Gardiner promises that... (full context) Chapter 26 Jane travels with the Gardiners to London and writes a letter to Elizabeth. She says that... (full context) Chapter 27 ...Elizabeth go to visit Charlotte, stopping along the way in London to check up on Jane. Speaking privately with Elizabeth, Mrs. Gardiner confirms that Jane feels dejected, but she thinks that... (full context) Chapter 30 ...usual reserve. Conversation is sparse. Darcy seems uncomfortable when Elizabeth asks if he ever sees Jane in London, but the moment passes. (full context) Chapter 33 ...an "imprudent marriage." Elizabeth realizes that Fitzwilliam is unknowingly referencing a story about Bingley and Jane, and is appalled to realize that Darcy ruined Jane's chances with Bingley. Darcy, she thinks,... (full context) Chapter 34 Darcy is astonished and demands an explanation. Elizabeth blasts him for insulting her, for ruining Jane's happiness forever, and for robbing Wickham of his chances in life. (full context) Darcy stands by his decision to break up Bingley and Jane. He is sarcastic about Wickham's misfortunes. And he tells Elizabeth that he was only being... (full context) Chapter 35 ...her a letter of explanation. In the letter, Darcy answers Elizabeth's charges of misconduct toward Jane and Wickham. He knew that Bingley was in love with Jane, but he detected no... (full context) Chapter 36 Elizabeth also rereads the part of the letter about Jane, and realizes that she can't blame Darcy for intervening: Jane was reserved, as Charlotte had... (full context) Chapter 38 Elizabeth arrives in London to visit with the Gardiners before returning to Longbourn with Jane. Though desperate to share her news about Darcy, she is apprehensive that the news about... (full context) Chapter 39 On their way to Longbourn, Elizabeth and Jane are met by Kitty and Lydia, who talk constantly about the soldiers. Lydia tells them... (full context) When they arrive home, Mr. Bennet is glad to see Elizabeth and Jane, Mrs. Bennet wants to hear about the latest fashions, and Kitty and Lydia want to... (full context) Chapter 40 Later, Elizabeth tells Jane how Darcy proposed to her and also shares the part of Darcy's letter about Wickham.... (full context) Elizabeth asks for Jane's advice: should they publicize Wickham's faults? They agree not to, for the sake of Darcy... (full context) Chapter 44 ...to see Elizabeth, and asks questions that lead Elizabeth to suspect he might still love Jane. Darcy and Georgiana invite Elizabeth and the Gardiners to Pemberley for dinner the next evening. (full context) Chapter 46 At her inn, Elizabeth receives two awful letters from Jane. The first contains the shocking news that Lydia had run off with Wickham to get... (full context) Chapter 47 In the carriage, Mr. Gardiner wonders if Jane might be right in hoping for the best: Wickham knows Lydia has no money and... (full context) Elizabeth and Jane dissect the situation. They are relieved that apparently Lydia did think she was getting married,... (full context) Chapter 49 ...for Lydia, he says. The Bennets all agree that Lydia and Wickham must marry, but Jane and Elizabeth wonder how they can ever repay Mr. Gardiner. (full context) Jane and Elizabeth share the news with Mrs. Bennet, who is overjoyed, instantly forgetting Lydia's disgrace.... (full context) Chapter 50 ...Northern England and that Lydia hopes they can visit Longbourn on their way. Elizabeth and Jane convince Mr. Bennet, who wants nothing to do with Lydia or Wickham, to let the... (full context) Chapter 53 ...at Pemberley, and Elizabeth doubts he has returned for her. Bingley, however, warms up to Jane as the initial awkwardness subsides. Mrs. Bennet reminds Bingley about having left the neighborhood so... (full context) Chapter 54 At the dinner party, Bingley decides to take the seat next to Jane—just as he used to. Watching them, Elizabeth is sure that Bingley will soon propose. (full context) Chapter 55 Bingley visits again, this time alone. Mrs. Bennet, expecting a proposal, awkwardly clears everyone but Jane from the room. Nothing happens. The next morning, Bingley returns to shoot with Mr. Bennet.... (full context) Overjoyed, Jane goes upstairs to tell her mother. Bingley and Elizabeth greet each other as brother and... (full context) Bingley tells Jane that he didn't know she was in London, but—to Elizabeth's relief—he leaves Darcy out of... (full context) Chapter 56 Lady Catherine gets to the point: she knows of Jane's engagement; she also knows that Elizabeth has tricked her nephew, Darcy, into proposing as well.... (full context) Chapter 58 Darcy explains that he told Bingley the truth about Jane and advised him to return to Netherfield. Bingley was angry about being deceived while Jane... (full context) Chapter 59 That night, Elizabeth tells Jane everything. Jane thinks Elizabeth is joking. After all, doesn't Elizabeth hate Darcy? Elizabeth explains how... (full context) ...of shock, Mrs. Bennet joyfully stutters that Elizabeth will be genteel and rich—even richer than Jane! Elizabeth fears that her mother will continue to embarrass Darcy, but Mrs. Bennet, because she's... (full context) Chapter 61 A year later, Jane and Bingley move into an estate near Elizabeth and Darcy at Pemberley. Mrs. Bennet, extremely... (full context) Jane (Miss Bennet) is the eldest and most beautiful of the five sisters. She and Elizabeth are particularly close and are always able to speak honestly to each other though their characters are contrasted. In the novel, Jane: dances with Bingley at the first ball and they are immediately attracted is invited by Bingley’s sisters to Netherfield, where she falls ill and is visited by Elizabeth is invited to London by the Gardiners and hopes to meet Bingley again, but is hurt and disappointed when she receives only a single visit from Miss Bingley accepts Bingley’s offer of marriage when he eventually returns to Netherfield. Contrast Jane with Elizabeth and also with Charlotte Lucas when writing about the theme of marriage. It would be impossible for Jane ever to scheme to catch a husband. Her misplaced trust in Caroline Bingley leaves her unsuspecting of the true reasons for Bingley’s absence (Vol. 1, Ch. 21). JANE BENNET EXAM FOCUS: WRITING ABOUT JANE Key point Evidence Jane is gentle and credits people with good reasons for their actions. ‘her mild and steady candour always pleaded for allowances’ (Vol. 2, Ch. 1, p. 115). She takes an optimistic view of the human race. ‘poor Jane! who would willingly have gone through the world without believing that so much wickedness existed in the whole race of mankind’ (Vol. 2, Ch. 17, p. 185). She protects herself so effectively that most people do not notice what she is feeling. ‘My mother means well; but she does not know, no one can know how much I suffer from what she says’ (Vol. 3, Ch. 11, pp. 274–5). « PREVIOUS NEXT » Austen emphasises the unsatisfactory nature of Lydia’s wedding and arrival at Longbourn by considering it from Jane or Elizabeth’s point of view: ‘Jane more especially, who gave Lydia the feelings that should have attended herself had she been the culprit, was wretched in the thought of what her sister must endure’ (p. 259). This emphasises the comic surprise of Lydia’s arrival: ‘Lydia was Lydia still; untamed, unabashed, wild, noisy and fearless’ (p. 259). She, like Mrs Bennet, is a character who is incapable of development. Others, even her sister Kitty, have the capability to learn and to change. Lydia boasts of her married state, declaring that she now takes precedence over Jane at the table and offering to ‘get husbands’ for her sisters. ‘“I thank you for my share of the favour,” said Elizabeth; “but I do not particularly like your way of getting husbands”’ (p. 261).

4

Mr Bingley

Romantically inclined towards Jane Bennet

good natured and friendly

easily led by the opinions of others

eager to please

Darcy's best friend

the wealthy occupant of Netherfield Hall

Someone who always sees the best in people

 

 

 

Charles Bingley Bingley is Darcy's best friend and the brother of Caroline Bingley and Mrs. Hurst. Unlike Darcy, however, Bingley is down to earth. Despite his huge wealth, he is humble and modest, placing no great weight on social standing. Mr Bingley is a rich young man whose money has been made in trade. This means he does not have the land, responsibilities or social standing of his friend Mr Darcy. He has two sisters: one (Louisa) is married, the other (Caroline) is single. In the novel, he: rents Netherfield Park and brings his sisters and friend to stay with him there is attracted to Jane Bennet as soon as they first dance together has little self-esteem (the good side of pride) so it is easy for Darcy to persuade him that Jane does not care for him; he rushes away from Netherfield as unexpectedly as he has arrived is not fickle, although he is hasty; he continues to love Jane and wastes no time in proposing to her as soon as he knows she has loved him all along. MR CHARLES BINGLEY EXAM FOCUS: WRITING ABOUT BINGLEY Key point Evidence He is friendly, approachable, kindly and well mannered. ‘He is just what a young man ought to be,’ says Jane Bennet (Vol. 1, Ch. 4, p.10). His attraction to Jane is immediate and lasting. ‘he could not imagine an angel more beautiful’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 4, p. 12). He is more likely to turn to Darcy than to trust himself. This is the other side of his modesty and easy-going nature. ‘Upon my word I cannot exactly explain the matter, Darcy must speak for himself.’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 10, p. 40). Bingley’s arrival at Netherfield sets the whole story in motion and is the occasion for the famous opening sentence about eligible bachelors. When thinking about the predatory approach to marriage Austen implies – Mrs Bennet’s behaviour is a prime example of this –we might feel some sympathy for Mr Bingley. Darcy has a protective attitude to his friend, as explained by Colonel Fitzwilliam (Vol. 2, Ch. 10); but we also know how much pain Jane suffers because of Darcy’s interference. Notice how Bingley and Darcy are compared and contrasted from their first appearance (Vol. 1, Ch. 3, p. 7) and also when Elizabeth is staying at Netherfield (Vol. 1, Ch. 8–11). Bingley is always easier to like but Elizabeth is right to think his easiness may make him weak (Vol. 3, Ch. 16, p. 308) – he is easily persuaded and influenced by his friend. TOP TIP Compare Bingley’s friendship with and respect for Darcy with Wickham’s attitude. Wickham has no real friends or background and is isolated in the novel as a result. « PREVIOUS NEXT » Elizabeth attempts to persuade her father not to allow Lydia to go.

5

Mr Bennet

The father of 5 daughters

sharp-witted and sometimes sarcastic

closest to Elizabeth, of all his daughters

intolerant of foolishness and childishness

quiet and studious

rather unhappily married to Mrs Bennet

enjoys staying in his study as a retreat

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Bennet Character Analysis Though a discerning, well-educated man, Mr. Bennet has made a bad marriage and is resigned to endure it. He is a good-hearted person, but fails his family by remaining sarcastically detached: everything is a joke to him. This leads to poor judgment, as when he does not interfere between Lydia and Wickham. Mr. Bennet Quotes in Pride and Prejudice The Pride and Prejudice quotes below are all either spoken by Mr. Bennet or refer to Mr. Bennet. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one: Pride Theme Icon ). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Classics edition of Pride and Prejudice published in 2002. Chapter 41 Quotes Our importance, our respectability in the world must be affected by the wild volatility, the assurance and disdain of all restraint which mark Lydia's character. Excuse me—for I must speak plainly. If you, my dear father, will not take the trouble of checking her exuberant spirits, and of teaching her that her present pursuits are not to be the business of her life, she will soon be beyond the reach of amendment. Chapter 48 Quotes The death of your daughter would have been a blessing in comparison of this ... They agree with me in apprehending that this false step in one daughter will be injurious to the fortunes of all the others; for who, as Lady Catherine herself condescendingly says, will connect themselves with such a family? That is what makes it amusing. Had they fixed on any other man it would have been nothing; but his perfect indifference, and your pointed dislike, make it so delightfully absurd! Chapter 59 Quotes I know that you could be neither happy nor respectable, unless you truly esteemed your husband; unless you looked up to him as a superior. Your lively talents would place you in the greatest danger in an unequal marriage ... My child, let me not have the grief of seeing you unable to respect your partner in life. Chapter 1 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...day in their modest house in Longbourn, Mrs. Bennet shares some news with her husband, Mr. Bennet . A wealthy young gentleman, Charles Bingley, has just rented the nearby estate of Netherfield.... (full context) Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Mrs. Bennet asks her husband to get them an introduction. Mr. Bennet purposely frustrates his wife by sarcastically replying that he'll write to give his consent for... (full context) Chapter 2 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Without telling his family, Mr. Bennet visits Bingley. Back at home, Mr. Bennet teases his family by pretending to be uninterested... (full context) Chapter 3 Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Mr. Bingley pays a return visit to Mr. Bennet and is subsequently invited to dinner at Longbourn. Elaborate plans are made, but Bingley breaks... (full context) Chapter 7 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...They make frequent visits to Mrs. Philips to learn all they can about the officers. Mr. Bennet dismisses the girls as incredibly silly. (full context) Chapter 12 Family Theme Icon Though Mrs. Bennet is disappointed that Jane and Elizabeth didn't stay, Mr. Bennet is glad to have them back. He had missed their conversation amid Kitty and Lydia's... (full context) Chapter 13 Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon The next morning, Mr. Bennet reveals to his family that they will have a surprise guest: Mr. Collins, the relative... (full context) Chapter 14 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon After dinner, Mr. Bennet gets Mr. Collins talking about his favorite subjects: his benefactress, Lady Catherine De Bourgh; her... (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Mr. Bennet invites Mr. Collins to read to the ladies. Offered a novel, Mr. Collins flinches in... (full context) Chapter 20 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...congratulate Mr. Collins but is shocked to hear that Elizabeth refused him. She runs to Mr. Bennet and demands that he convince his daughter to accept. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Mr. Bennet calmly calls in Elizabeth and, relishing the moment, tells her: "Your mother will never see... (full context) Chapter 24 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Wickham occasionally visits and his pleasant company helps to dispel the gloom. Mr. Bennet encourages Elizabeth in her pursuit of Wickham. (full context) Chapter 39 Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon When they arrive home, Mr. Bennet is glad to see Elizabeth and Jane, Mrs. Bennet wants to hear about the latest... (full context) Chapter 41 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...the wife of Colonel Forster to come with the regiment to Brighton. Elizabeth secretly asks Mr. Bennet to stop Lydia from going. Elizabeth urges him to realize how Lydia's flirty foolishness will... (full context) Chapter 42 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Elizabeth reflects on her disappointment regarding her parents' marriage. After Mr. Bennet realized he married a foolish woman, he sought comfort in his library and in making... (full context) Chapter 46 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...at all, and that the two of them were now in London. The colonel and Mr. Bennet have gone there to search; Mrs. Bennet is a nervous wreck. Jane asks Elizabeth to... (full context) Chapter 48 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Mr. Bennet and Mr. Gardiner search hotels in London to no avail. Mr. Gardiner suggests that Elizabeth... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon More time passes, but all attempts to find Wickham and Lydia fail, and Mr. Bennet returns home. He asks Elizabeth not to talk with him about Lydia, saying that he... (full context) Chapter 49 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Mr. Bennet says he strongly suspects that Mr. Gardiner has already paid Wickham much more. Wickham would... (full context) Chapter 50 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...and that Lydia hopes they can visit Longbourn on their way. Elizabeth and Jane convince Mr. Bennet , who wants nothing to do with Lydia or Wickham, to let the new couple... (full context) Chapter 55 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...but Jane from the room. Nothing happens. The next morning, Bingley returns to shoot with Mr. Bennet . When Bingley comes inside, Mrs. Bennet again empties the room. Elizabeth returns from writing... (full context) Chapter 57 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon The next morning, Mr. Bennet calls in Elizabeth to congratulate her on her upcoming engagement. Elizabeth is stunned. Mr. Bennet... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Mr. Bennet thinks the rumor about Elizabeth and Darcy is hilarious because he is certain that Elizabeth... (full context) Chapter 59 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Later Darcy visits Mr. Bennet in private to ask his consent to marry Elizabeth. Mr. Bennet calls in Elizabeth. He's... (full context) Chapter 60 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth writes to tell Mrs. Gardiner of her engagement, as does Darcy to Lady Catherine. Mr. Bennet writes to Mr. Collins who, along with Charlotte, soon return to town to congratulate the... (full context) Chapter 61 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...an estate near Elizabeth and Darcy at Pemberley. Mrs. Bennet, extremely proud, visits them often. Mr. Bennet misses Elizabeth and visits frequently, too. Kitty improves in character from spending time with her... (full context) Previous Mrs. Bennet Mr Bennet is a gentleman farmer whose estate provides an income of two thousand pounds per year but which will go to his cousin when he dies. In the novel Mr Bennet: is clever and amusing but not easy to live with. In the first chapter he pretends that he won’t visit Mr Bingley but does. He is always ready to mock or tease his wife in front of his daughters and later humiliates his daughter Mary in public. allows Mr Collins to visit the house partly so that he can laugh at him generally plays a role in the novel defined by what he does not do. He criticises his younger daughters for running after officers but does nothing to stop them. He loves Elizabeth but does not listen to her nor understand or comfort Jane in her distress. He has never saved money so cannot help Lydia. Whilst Mr Bennet appears an intelligent and sensible man, his lack of control as far as Lydia is concerned makes his treatment of her seem foolish. When Elizabeth asks, ‘Can [Mr Collins] be a sensible man, sir?’ after listening to the content of his letter, Mr Bennet accurately identifies his ‘mixture of servility and self-importance’ (p. 52). Letters are a key part of the structure of Pride and Prejudice. It is important to notice where they occur and what effect they have. Enjoying the joke with his quick minded, quick witted daughter in a way that would be impossible with his wife Mr Bennet is not a perfect father and his poor relationship with his wife is a weakness in the family. However he is rational, intelligent and humorous and on this occasion he deals with the situation decisively. ‘Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr Collins, and I will never see you again if you do’ (p. 93). Austen expresses the balance and clarity of Mr Bennet’s mind through the balance and clarity of this sentence. Elizabeth shares this quality of rational thought and clear expression. For example, she tells Mr Collins, ‘You could not make me happy, and I am convinced that I am the last woman in the world who would make you so’ (p. 90). . Mr Bennet thinks this is ‘delightfully absurd’ (p. 301) and can’t understand why Elizabeth is not amused Elizabeth and her father have always been united by their sense of humour. He has not noticed how she has changed: ‘Never had his wit been directed in a manner so little agreeable to her’ (p. 300). She is suffering as Jane suffered from their mother’s tactless comments about Bingley. There is a revealing moment when Mr Bennet says, ‘For what do we live but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?’ (p. 301) This may remind you of the moment when Elizabeth tells Darcy how much she enjoys a joke: ‘Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 11, p. 46). The linking word is ‘divert’. Now, in this awkward conversation, Mr Bennet asks Elizabeth whether she is amused by Mr Collins’s suggestion that Mr Darcy might be attracted to her. She claims she is ‘excessively diverted’ (p. 301) but it is not true. She has discovered that there are more serious reasons for existence than laughing at other people, even Mr Collins.

6

Mrs. Bennet

 

Desperate for her 5 daughters to marry wealthy men to secure financially stable futures for them

likes being the centre of attention

melodramatic (being more emotional than is necessary)

tactless

ill-mannered

foolish

 

What is Mrs Bennet’s main aim in life? ‘The business of her life was to get her daughters married  ...’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 1, p. 3) This novel about marriage opens with a marriage that is clearly not a happy one. Mr Bennet’s teasing of Mrs Bennet could be read as affectionate in a different context but the narrator soon makes it clear that husband and wife are incompatible: ‘the experience of three and twenty years had been insufficient to make his wife understand his character’ (p. 3). The dialogue shows Mr Bennet using his cleverness to make a fool of her in front of their children. He shows his weary contempt when he leaves the room ‘fatigued’ by her ‘raptures’ (p. 5). The narrator describes him as ‘so odd a mixture’ (p. 3) but shows no sympathy at all for Mrs Bennet, who is condemned as ‘a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper’ (p. 3). Mrs. Bennet Character Analysis Mrs. Bennet is a giddy, frivolous woman whose only purpose in life seems to be gossiping and marrying off her five daughters. She lacks any awareness of her vulgar conduct and embarrasses Elizabeth and Jane to no end. Her behavior depicts what can happen to women when they lack an education and the ability to think for themselves. Mrs. Bennet Quotes in Pride and Prejudice The Pride and Prejudice quotes below are all either spoken by Mrs. Bennet or refer to Mrs. Bennet. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one: Pride Theme Icon ). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Classics edition of Pride and Prejudice published in 2002. Chapter 49 Quotes It is all very right; who should do it but her own uncle? If he had not had a family of his own, I and my children must have had all his money, you know; and it is the first time we have ever had anything from him, except a few presents. Well! I am so happy! In a short time I shall have a daughter married. Mrs. Wickham! How well it sounds! Related Characters: Mrs. Bennet (speaker), George Wickham, Lydia Bennet, Mr. Gardiner Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon , Chapter 1 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...wife." Then the narrator begins the story. One day in their modest house in Longbourn, Mrs. Bennet shares some news with her husband, Mr. Bennet. A wealthy young gentleman, Charles Bingley, has... (full context) Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Mrs. Bennet asks her husband to get them an introduction. Mr. Bennet purposely frustrates his wife by... (full context) Chapter 2 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Mrs. Bennet is delighted and praises her husband and his little joke. She promises all the girls... (full context) Chapter 3 Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Returning home, Mrs. Bennet regales her husband with an abundance of details. She is excited for Jane and convinced... (full context) Chapter 7 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon A letter arrives to Jane from Caroline Bingley inviting her to visit. Mrs. Bennet schemes to send Jane on horseback, even though it will rain, so that she will... (full context) Chapter 9 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Elizabeth sends home a note requesting that her mother come and visit Jane. Mrs. Bennet arrives with Lydia and, not wishing Jane to leave Bingley's company, declares that Jane seems... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon In conversation, Mrs. Bennet , seeking to raise Jane's status, tries to impress Bingley about her family and their... (full context) Chapter 12 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth and Jane write to Mrs. Bennet to send their carriage to take them home. Mrs. Bennet, still scheming to have them... (full context) Family Theme Icon Though Mrs. Bennet is disappointed that Jane and Elizabeth didn't stay, Mr. Bennet is glad to have them... (full context) Chapter 13 Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...surprise guest: Mr. Collins, the relative who will inherit Mr. Bennet's estate. The news upsets Mrs. Bennet because Mr. Collins can legally kick Mrs. Bennet and her daughters out of the house... (full context) Chapter 15 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...so will atone for the injustice of his taking over their inheritance. He privately tells Mrs. Bennet his intentions, and she redirects his target from Jane, whom she hopes will marry Bingley,... (full context) Chapter 18 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...Collins rudely introduces himself to Darcy and later pontificates to the whole assembly. Darcy overhears Mrs. Bennet talking about Jane and Bingley like they're already married. Mary insists on playing the piano,... (full context) Chapter 20 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Mrs. Bennet rushes in to congratulate Mr. Collins but is shocked to hear that Elizabeth refused him.... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Outraged, Mrs. Bennet tries to find support from anyone else: Jane, who keeps out of it, and then... (full context) Chapter 23 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Sir William Lucas arrives to share his happy news. Mrs. Bennet and Lydia rudely exclaim that they cannot believe it, but Elizabeth intervenes to congratulate him... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Mrs. Bennet fumes for days. She is angry with Elizabeth, the Lucases, and Charlotte, who will someday... (full context) Chapter 25 Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Mr. Collins leaves again and Mrs. Bennet 's brother and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner, arrive for a visit. Mr. Gardiner is... (full context) Family Theme Icon After listening sympathetically to Mrs. Bennet 's outpouring of complaints, Mrs. Gardiner speaks with Elizabeth about Jane's situation. Elizabeth confirms that... (full context) Chapter 39 Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon When they arrive home, Mr. Bennet is glad to see Elizabeth and Jane, Mrs. Bennet wants to hear about the latest fashions, and Kitty and Lydia want to walk to... (full context) Chapter 42 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...married a foolish woman, he sought comfort in his library and in making fun of Mrs. Bennet . Though Elizabeth hates to admit it, Mr. Bennet has failed as a respectful spouse... (full context) Chapter 46 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...them were now in London. The colonel and Mr. Bennet have gone there to search; Mrs. Bennet is a nervous wreck. Jane asks Elizabeth to come home immediately; she also requests that... (full context) Chapter 47 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon At Longbourn, Mrs. Bennet is holed up in her room, frantic with nervousness, and blames Colonel Foster for not... (full context) Chapter 49 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Jane and Elizabeth share the news with Mrs. Bennet , who is overjoyed, instantly forgetting Lydia's disgrace. Asked about repaying Mr. Gardiner, Mrs. Bennet... (full context) Chapter 50 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon As Mrs. Bennet makes plans for Lydia's wedding, Elizabeth regrets having told Darcy about the scandal. She expects... (full context) Chapter 53 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Soon after Wickham and Lydia leave, Mrs. Bennet hears rumors that Bingley is returning to Netherfield. Mr. Bennet refuses to visit him, however. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...has returned for her. Bingley, however, warms up to Jane as the initial awkwardness subsides. Mrs. Bennet reminds Bingley about having left the neighborhood so suddenly, and reinvites Bingley and Darcy to... (full context) Chapter 54 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Darcy, however, sits at the far end of the table from Elizabeth, next to Mrs. Bennet , and barely speaks to Elizabeth. Afterwards, she feels silly for thinking she had another... (full context) Chapter 55 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Bingley visits again, this time alone. Mrs. Bennet , expecting a proposal, awkwardly clears everyone but Jane from the room. Nothing happens. The... (full context) Chapter 56 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...Lady Catherine De Bourgh makes a surprise visit to Longbourn. She says almost nothing to Mrs. Bennet , coolly inspecting the rooms and property, then asks Elizabeth to take a walk. (full context) Chapter 59 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Mrs. Bennet is annoyed when Darcy returns the next day with Bingley. She apologizes to Elizabeth for... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Elizabeth tells her mother the news that night. After a moment of shock, Mrs. Bennet joyfully stutters that Elizabeth will be genteel and rich—even richer than Jane! Elizabeth fears that... (full context) Chapter 61 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...year later, Jane and Bingley move into an estate near Elizabeth and Darcy at Pemberley. Mrs. Bennet , extremely proud, visits them often. Mr. Bennet misses Elizabeth and visits frequently, too. Kitty... (full context) Plus so much more... Get LitCharts A+ Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in! Mrs Bennet is a tradesman’s daughter with little money of her own. They live at Longbourn and have five daughters. In the novel Mrs Bennet: is excited by the news that Mr Bingley is coming to Netherfield as she is desperate to find husbands for her daughters is quite undiscriminating so is equally glad to welcome Mr Collins (once she has got over her prejudice) sees nothing wrong with Mr Wickham’s character once he and Lydia are actually married. is very shallow and changeable – note her treatment of her friend Lady Lucas for instance is usually seen from the point of view of Jane or Elizabeth, who find her behaviour embarrassing in public and insensitive in private. MR AND MRS BENNET TOP TIP: WRITING ABOUT MR AND MRS BENNET Mr and Mrs Bennet are incompatible. She doesn’t understand him: he understands and despises her. Later we are told that they married as a result of a physical attraction which did not last. Can we infer that Lydia and Wickham’s marriage will go the same way? TOP TIP The final scene between Elizabeth and her father (Vol. 3, Ch. 17, pp. 311–12) is essential to understanding his character and is crucially relevant to the theme of marriage. « PREVIOUS NEXT » THEMES EXAM FOCUS: WRITING ABOUT THEMES Austen’s main themes, such as pride and prejudice, are often apparent in quite minor scenes as well as the more obvious set pieces. Read this analysis by a student of Mrs Bennet’s visit to Netherfield: Mrs Bennet has been prejudiced against Darcy ever since he failed to dance with Elizabeth at the Meryton Assembly. She is also comically proud of her locality – there is no evidence that she has ever lived anywhere else. Therefore when Darcy makes a comment about the relative lack of ‘intricate characters’ in a country neighbourhood Mrs Bennet takes offence. ‘“Yes indeed” [she cried] “I can assure you that there is quite as much of that going on in the country as in the town.”’ She probably isn’t quite clear what ‘intricate’ means; Mrs Bennet’s conversation is usually confined to domestic details, local gossip and herself. Austen uses silence effectively as she shows Darcy looking at Mrs Bennet for a moment, then turning away. His movement reveals his contempt but Mrs Bennet assumes she has won a ‘victory’. Her aggressive attitude towards such an eligible man as Darcy, is surprising as well as rude and shows the extent of her prejudice and also her wounded pride. Now you try it: Write a further paragraph on how other characters respond. Begin: The reaction of the other characters… « PREVIOUS Jane Bennet is the kindest and most unselfish person in the novel and therefore suffers the most from her mother’s behaviour. From the beginning of the story we have been told that Mrs Bennet feels unwell when anything upsets her so it is no surprise when Jane tells Elizabeth, ‘My poor mother is really ill and keeps to her room.’ Elizabeth understands at once that this means Jane has had to manage everything as their sisters are almost equally selfish. We learn that ‘Mary studies so much, that her hours of repose should not be broken in on’. Even when Mrs Bennet imagines her husband being killed in a duel she is only worried about herself and being turned out of Longbourn. This is a reasonable fear but within a few sentences she is equally anxious about Lydia’s clothes. We can infer that she has no moral standards or sense of proportion. NEXT » Mrs Bennet’s response is predictably shallow: now that her daughter has been saved from disgrace she makes plans to go out visiting her neighbours again and spend more money on clothes and a large house for the newly weds. Elizabeth knows her mother will be either violently set against the match or violently delighted. Notice how Austen springs a small surprise: Mrs Bennet is silent. After that her speech is even more fragmented than usual, full of incomplete sentences and exclamation marks. Ending Mrs Bennet’s disgust evaporates at the prospect of Darcy’s large income. Austen gives a summary of the characters and their future situations. Mrs Bennet, despite having her wildest dreams fulfilled, remains as silly as ever,

7

Mr. Collins

the Bennets' cousin

a vicar near Rosings (Lady cathrine de Bourgh's estate)

the legal inheritor of Longbourn (the Bennets' estate)

overly formal and very eager to please

a comical figure who does the wrong thing in social situations

keen to marry for the sake of being married

thoughtless and lacking in Christian kindness and generosity

prepared to change the target of his marriage proposal when Elizabeth turns him down

 

 

Mr Collins Pompous, ridiculous clergyman – main job ‘demeaning himself’ with respect to his patron, Lady Catherine. He will inherit Longbourn. Proposes to Elizabeth and is rejected but then marries Charlotte. Mr. Collins Mr. Bennet's cousin and heir to the Bennet estate (in Austen's time, only men could inherit). His patroness is Lady Catherine. He is a ridiculous pompous clergyman concerned only with impressing others. Mr Collins is a Church of England rector who will inherit Mr Bennet’s estate. His patron is Lady Catherine de Bourgh, Darcy’s aunt. He arrives in the story at almost the same moment as Mr Wickham. In the novel, he: invites himself to Longbourn as prospective inheritor of Mr Bennet’s estate. He is ready to marry and plans to make an offer to one of the girls – if they are as attractive as he has heard. proposes to Elizabeth (as Jane is not available) and, when rejected, proposes to her friend Charlotte Lucas a few days later talks all the time about his patroness Lady Catherine de Bourgh and sees it as his job to flatter her is delighted to announce that they are all invited to dine with Lady Catherine when Elizabeth and the Lucases visit Charlotte in her new home writes to Mr Bennet condemning Lydia’s behaviour and expressing relief that he didn’t marry Jane or Elizabeth so is not part of their disgrace warns against Elizabeth accepting a proposal from Darcy without Lady Catherine’s approval. Mr Bennet replies, cynically, ‘If I were you I would stand by the nephew. He has more to give’ (Vol. 3, Ch. 18, p. 317). MR WILLIAM COLLINS EXAM FOCUS: WRITING ABOUT MR COLLINS Key fact Evidence He is pompous, self-important, hypocritical and rather stupid. He grovels to Lady Catherine. ‘He was a tall, heavy looking young man of five and twenty. His air was grave and stately’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 13, p. 53). Elizabeth and her father see through him immediately. ‘“Can he be a sensible man, sir?” “No, my dear; I think not […] There is a mix of servility and self-importance in his letter which promises well”’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 13, p. 52). « PREVIOUS NEXT » Mr Collins finds it hard to believe that Elizabeth has rejected him: ‘and you should take it into farther consideration that in spite of your manifold attractions, it is by no means certain that another offer of marriage may ever be made to you’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 19, p. 91). His tone is almost threatening and forces us to understand the risk Elizabeth is taking by saying no, even to such an unattractive and ridiculous character Mr Bennet’s cousin, Mr Collins, invites himself to stay. Mrs Bennet is initially hostile as Mr Collins will inherit Longbourn when Mr Bennet dies – thus potentially making her and her daughters homeless. However, his expressed wish to offer ‘amends’ (p. 51) helps her decide to make him welcome. Mr Collins’s main topic of conversation is his patroness Lady Catherine de Bourgh. He is shocked when asked to read a novel. When Elizabeth asks, ‘Can [Mr Collins] be a sensible man, sir?’ after listening to the content of his letter, Mr Bennet accurately identifies his ‘mixture of servility and self-importance’ (p. 52). Letters are a key part of the structure of Pride and Prejudice. It is important to notice where they occur and what effect they have. The introduction of Mr Collins – and his frequent references to Lady Catherine – begins a new storyline and has considerable significance for the overall plot . Mr Collins’s letter of introduction is one of many examples where Austen allows a character to reveal more about themselves than they intend. Device to illustrate entailment: Today it would be almost unthinkable for Mr Collins to be legally able to inherit the Longbourn estate and make Mrs Bennet and her daughters homeless just because he is male. Primogeniture (all property going to the oldest son) was usual in Jane Austen’s time but Lady Catherine de Bourgh’s family chose to be outside the male inheritance system – and she is hardly an admirable example. Male inheritance is the hard economic fact that makes it so important for the girls to find husbands. Mr Collins is right to say that his cousins’ beauty will help them be ‘well disposed of in marriage’ (p. 53). What do Mr Collins’s words to Lydia and his pleasure at backgammon reveal of his true character? SHOW/HIDE ANSWER Mr Collins’s hypocrisy is revealed. He lectures the young women on the evils of reading frivolous novels rather than serious sermons before he plays a game of chance. He is totally oblivious to the contradiction. His obsession with Lady Catherine’s wealth and the status that her patronage gives him is also arguably very anti Christian His terrible suggestion that it would be better that Lydia had died than be disgraced. This was though sadly a sign of the times Mr Collins reveals that he is looking for a wife. Jane is his first choice but when he is told that she is almost engaged to Bingley, he switches to Elizabeth. He has no real feelings for either. He is a ridiculous figure Mr Collins breaches social convention by going to talk to Mr Darcy without being formally introduced by someone else. Elizabeth ‘tried hard to dissuade’ (p. 81) Mr Collins from introducing himself. Do you think she is protecting Mr Collins or secretly worried about Darcy’s reaction to this embarrassing cousin? Boiled potatoes ...? Gesture of trying to unite the families Austen presents Mr Collins as a caricature rather than as a rounded human being whose feelings might be hurt by Elizabeth’s rejection: ‘though his pride was hurt, he suffered in no other way’ (p. 94). Although he presents himself as generous about money, the fact that he mentions it at all in a proposal of marriage is also revealing: ‘it is by no means certain that another offer of marriage will ever be made you. Your portion is unhappily so small that it will in all likelihood undo the effects of your loveliness and amiable qualifications’ (p. 91). The earlier discussion about flattery when he acknowledges he plans flattery [in the book? Or just film{ Lady cs puppet Mr aCollins writes to Mr Bennet advising him that Lady Catherine will never give her consent to ‘so disgraceful a match’ (p. 300). The Collinses arrive at Lucas Lodge to escape Lady Catherine’s ill temper.

8

George Wickham

son of the popety manager of Darcy's father

one of the officers in the Mertyon regiment

easy-going and charming

a gampble who has got into debt

deceitful

the lover of lydia Bennet, whome he marries after receiving a financial settlement

 

 

 

George Wickham Character Analysis Wickham is an officer in the local military regiment and appears to be the very model of a gentleman. In reality, he is a liar, hypocrite, and an opportunist. He thinks nothing of ruining a young woman's reputation, and is instead much more concerned with paying off his massive gambling debts. George Wickham Quotes in Pride and Prejudice The Pride and Prejudice quotes below are all either spoken by George Wickham or refer to George Wickham. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one: Pride Theme Icon ). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Classics edition of Pride and Prejudice published in 2002. Chapter 16 Quotes When Mr. Wickham walked into the room, Elizabeth felt that she had neither been seeing him before, nor thinking of him since, with the smallest degree of unreasonable admiration. The officers of the —shire were in general a very creditable, gentlemanlike set, and the best of them were of the present party; but Mr. Wickham was as far beyond them all in person, countenance, air, and walk. Chapter 40 Quotes There certainly was some great mismanagement in the education of those two young men. One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it. Chapter 15 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon ...to Meryton. There, everyone's attention is captured by a striking and unfamiliar young man: Mr. Wickham, who just accepted a post in the regiment. Wickham's conversation is friendly and lively. (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon ...then, Bingley and Darcy come up the street and stop to chat. When Darcy and Wickham see each other, each man recoils in shock. Elizabeth wonders how they know each other.... (full context) Chapter 16 Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon At dinner the next evening, Elizabeth is fascinated by Wickham's pleasant demeanor. The two of them easily fall into conversation and Wickham soon asks about... (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Wickham explains that he was the son of one of Darcy's father's employees, and that he... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Elizabeth asks about Darcy's sister, Georgiana. Wickham says that she is an accomplished young woman living in London but that she is,... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Wickham, hearing Mr. Collins go on about Lady Catherine, informs Elizabeth that Lady Catherine is actually... (full context) Chapter 17 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon ...so blameworthy and that there must be other parts to the story. But Elizabeth believes Wickham, saying "there was truth in his looks." She wonders how Bingley could actually be Darcy's... (full context) Chapter 18 Prejudice Theme Icon Arriving at the ball at Netherfield, Elizabeth is disappointed to realize that Wickham is not at the party. Elizabeth blames Darcy for Wickham's absence. She endures two dreadful... (full context) Prejudice Theme Icon ...she accepts. Their conversation is short and abrupt. Darcy is uncomfortable when she brings up Wickham. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Afterwards, Caroline approaches Elizabeth about Wickham. He wasn't wronged by Darcy, she says. On the contrary, Wickham treated Darcy terribly and... (full context) Chapter 21 Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon One morning, the Bennet sisters walk to Meryton and meet Wickham who confirms to Elizabeth that he was avoiding Darcy at the ball. He walks them... (full context) Chapter 24 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Wickham occasionally visits and his pleasant company helps to dispel the gloom. Mr. Bennet encourages Elizabeth... (full context) Chapter 26 Pride Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Having noticed the warmth between Elizabeth and Wickham, Mrs. Gardiner cautions Elizabeth about making an unpromising match, warning that Wickham has no fortune.... (full context) Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Around the same time, Wickham's interest shifts from Elizabeth to a young woman who recently inherited £10,000. Elizabeth finds she... (full context) Chapter 27 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Mrs. Gardiner also consoles Elizabeth about losing Wickham. She considers his shift in attention to a suddenly-rich woman to be quite self-serving. But... (full context) Chapter 34 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon ...explanation. Elizabeth blasts him for insulting her, for ruining Jane's happiness forever, and for robbing Wickham of his chances in life. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Darcy stands by his decision to break up Bingley and Jane. He is sarcastic about Wickham's misfortunes. And he tells Elizabeth that he was only being honest about his complicated feelings... (full context) Chapter 35 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...letter of explanation. In the letter, Darcy answers Elizabeth's charges of misconduct toward Jane and Wickham. He knew that Bingley was in love with Jane, but he detected no affection on... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Regarding Wickham, Darcy says that after Darcy's father died, Wickham resigned his opportunity with the church in... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Years passed. Wickham saw an opportunity with Darcy's sister Georgiana, who was both rich and, at age 15,... (full context) Chapter 36 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon ...upon rereading the letter, she starts to see things in a different light. Elizabeth realizes Wickham was inconsistent and that his history was never verified. She realizes that Wickham tricked her. (full context) Chapter 39 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...parents to take everyone there for the summer. Lydia adds, with delight, that the girl Wickham was pursuing has left town, leaving Wickham available. (full context) Chapter 40 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...Jane how Darcy proposed to her and also shares the part of Darcy's letter about Wickham. Elizabeth says that she can hardly believe how Darcy got all the goodness while Wickham... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Elizabeth asks for Jane's advice: should they publicize Wickham's faults? They agree not to, for the sake of Darcy and his sister. Besides, no... (full context) Chapter 41 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon In the days following, Elizabeth encounters Wickham at a social event. He blushes when she asks if he knows Colonel Fitzwilliam. When... (full context) Chapter 45 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon When Darcy arrives, Caroline tries to embarrass Elizabeth by bringing up her connection with Wickham. The plan backfires: the name of Wickham mortifies Georgiana, and only Elizabeth's cool handling of... (full context) Chapter 46 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...letters from Jane. The first contains the shocking news that Lydia had run off with Wickham to get married in Scotland. The second letter has much worse news: that Colonel Forster... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...running out the door and tells him the story. Elizabeth blames herself for not revealing Wickham's character to everyone, which would have prevented this. (full context) Chapter 47 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...the carriage, Mr. Gardiner wonders if Jane might be right in hoping for the best: Wickham knows Lydia has no money and stands to lose his reputation with his regiment, so... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon ...Colonel Foster for not watching over Lydia. She tells Mr. Gardiner to make Lydia and Wickham marry when they are found—and to make Lydia consult her about finding the best deals... (full context) Chapter 48 Prejudice Theme Icon Longbourn buzzes with the news. It comes out that Wickham accrued serious debts in Meryton as well as gambling debts at Brighton. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon ...to no avail. Mr. Gardiner suggests that Elizabeth ask for help from anyone related to Wickham. (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon More time passes, but all attempts to find Wickham and Lydia fail, and Mr. Bennet returns home. He asks Elizabeth not to talk with... (full context) Chapter 49 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Two days later, a letter arrives from Mr. Gardiner: Lydia and Wickham have been found! They are not yet married, but will be, provided that Mr. Bennet... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Mr. Bennet says he strongly suspects that Mr. Gardiner has already paid Wickham much more. Wickham would be a fool to take less for Lydia, he says. The... (full context) Chapter 50 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...told Darcy about the scandal. She expects him to distance himself from her now that Wickham will be joining the Bennet family. Elizabeth realizes that she and Darcy would have been... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Mr. Gardiner sends a letter saying that Wickham has changed regiments to one in Northern England and that Lydia hopes they can visit... (full context) Chapter 51 Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon Lydia and Wickham arrive at Longbourn. Lydia is giddy over her marriage, mocking her older sisters for failing... (full context) Marriage Theme Icon Yet during their ten-day visit, Elizabeth observes that Wickham doesn't entirely return Lydia's infatuation. She figures he ran away from creditors in Brighton and,... (full context) Chapter 52 Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Before Wickham leaves, Elizabeth encounters him on a walk. She reiterates that she knows his story but,... (full context) Chapter 53 Pride Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Soon after Wickham and Lydia leave, Mrs. Bennet hears rumors that Bingley is returning to Netherfield. Mr. Bennet... (full context) Pride Theme Icon Prejudice Theme Icon Family Theme Icon Marriage Theme Icon Class Theme Icon ...almost none to Darcy. She then goes on to speak glowingly about Lydia's marriage to Wickham, much to Elizabeth's mortification. (full context) George Wickham Character Analysis Wickham is an officer in the local military regiment and appears to be the very model of a gentleman. In reality, he is a liar, hypocrite, and an opportunist. He thinks nothing of ruining a young woman's reputation, and is instead much more concerned with paying off his massive gambling debts. George Wickham Quotes in Pride and Prejudice The Pride and Prejudice quotes below are all either spoken by George Wickham or refer to George Wickham. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one: Pride Theme Icon ). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Classics edition of Pride and Prejudice published in 2002. Chapter 16 Quotes When Mr. Wickham walked into the room, Elizabeth felt that she had neither been seeing him before, nor thinking of him since, with the smallest degree of unreasonable admiration. The officers of the —shire were in general a very creditable, gentlemanlike set, and the best of them were of the present party; but Mr. Wickham was as far beyond them all in person, countenance, air, and walk. Too cowardly despite his previous assertions that Darcy wouldn’t keep him away to go to the Netherfield ball Wickham is not at the Netherfield ball and Elizabeth has to dance with Mr Collins. Mr Wickham is an outwardly charming young man whose father served Darcy’s father on the Pemberley estate. If this novel has a human villain, it is Wickham. In the novel, he: meets the Bennet sisters when they have walked to Meryton with Mr Collins is immediately attractive uses his charm to fool Elizabeth into believing he was wronged byDarcy, who later explains that Wickham had tried to run away with his fifteen-year-old sister for the sake of her fortune develops a relationship with Elizabeth but when a Miss King inherits a large sum of money switches his attention to her elopes with Lydia. He does not intend to marry her but is persuaded to do so by Darcy, who pays his debts and buys him a commission in a new regiment. Wickham could be seen as a version of the romantic hero, the handsome stranger who enters the plot to sweep the heroine off her feet. In fact he is the villain. How might readers guess that they should be on their guard? MR GEORGE WICKHAM EXAM FOCUS: WRITING ABOUT MR WICKHAM Key point Evidence Wickham has the appearance and speech to charm any young woman. ‘he had all the best part of beauty, a fine countenance, a good figure, and very pleasing address’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 15, p. 59). Even the clear-sighted Elizabeth is initially won over. ‘Elizabeth thought with pleasure of dancing a great deal with Mr Wickham’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 17, p. 72). Jane learns from Bingley that Wickham is not all he seems. ‘Mr Wickham is by no means a respectable young man’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 18, p. 80). Wickham’s interest in women is purely to do with money. ‘His attentions to Miss King were now the consequence of views solely and hatefully mercenary’ (Vol. 2, Ch. 13, p. 172). His lack of feeling and consideration for anyone but himself is confirmed. ‘Wickham’s affection for Lydia, was just what Elizabeth had expected to find it; not equal to Lydia’s for him’ (Vol. 3, Ch. 9, p. 261). « PREVIOUS NEXT » Mr Collins and Mr Wickham so close together in the story, Austen would have expected readers to contrast the two men – just as Elizabeth and her sisters do. However, while the narrator makes it perfectly clear that Mr Collins is a pompous caricature, there is no guidance at all about Wickham. Compare this to the way that the other eligible bachelors, Bingley and Darcy, have been introduced. There has been detailed information about their incomes, families, personalities. About Wickham there is nothing. Wickham’s role in the novel is in part as a device to show Elizabeth - and the community at Meryton’s - prejudice based on erroneous first impressions. W also links the histories of Darcy and Elizabeth: Both suffer a younger sister almost ruin due to being beguiled by him Although the themes of pride and prejudice are the main antogonudtic forces in o and p, Wickham in simple terms is the antagonist to Darcy. He appears to be a love interest for Elizabeth rather than Darcy, and he’s one of the key reasons why she thinks so I’ll if Darcy (coupled with her own impressions and responses to Darcys behaviour if course) Elizabeth says of Wickham ‘there was truth in his looks’ (p. 71). In fact she has been misled by his superficial attractiveness into believing his story without any proof. Wickham turns his attention to Miss King, who has inherited a large sum of money. At first Elizabeth tells herself that Darcy’s and Wickham’s conflicting stories are both ‘only assertion’ (p. 170) but then realises how little she knows of Wickham’s background. She was convinced by his charm, good looks and local popularity. Now she realises how wrong it was of him to tell her such a story on first meeting and how wrong she had been to listen. Austen uses a string of negative words to express both the wrongness of Elizabeth’s behaviour and, more important (for the later development of the story), the falseness and untrustworthiness of Wickham: ‘impropriety’, ‘indelicacy’, ‘inconsistency’, ‘no fear’, ‘no reserves’, ‘no scruples’ (p. 171). Check back over the moments when a new character is introduced. There is often a surprisingly large amount of information concerning their money or their relatives. This reflects the smaller social world of Jane Austen’s times. Strangers were less common than they are today and proper introductions were important. Somehow Wickham has slipped through this protective net. It is not only Elizabeth who has been fooled by him – so has the ‘neighbourhood’ (p. 171). And the neighbourhood judged Darcy wrongly too, when he first appeared at the Meryton Assembly. Austen supports social conventions (such as correct introductions) but often satirises the changing nature and mistakes of public opinion. Jane is shocked by all she hears and they agree to keep their knowledge about Wickham’s true character a secret. Why was it a mistake for Elizabeth and Jane to conceal the truth about Wickham? SHOW/HIDE ANSWER Lydia announces that Wickham’s regiment is moving to Brighton. If Jane and Elizabeth had revealed the truth about Wickham, Mr Bennet might not have allowed Lydia to visit Brighton. This is the last time that Wickham will appear directly. He says goodbye to the Bennets with great charm: ‘He smiled, looked handsome, and said many pretty things’ (p. 272). Mr Bennet re-interprets this as ‘smirks’ and ‘simpers’. He then explicitly compares Mr Wickham to Mr Collins. Both men were introduced at the same point in the story but while Mr Collins was understood to be stupid and conceited even before he arrived, Wickham appeared charming and likeable at first. Elizabeth and the reader have learned that they were wrong to judge him by his attractive appearance. Underneath he is completely false – more so than Mr Collins.

9

Charlotte Lucas

Elizabeth's best friend

neither paritcularlypretty nor particularly rich

27 years odl and unmarried at the start of the novel

'sesnible' and unromantic about marriage

the wife of Mr Collins after he has been truend down by Elizabeth

 

 

 

Charlotte Lucas Elizabeth’s friend and eldest in her family; what she does matters to others. She marries Mr Collins for security not love, an attitude that shocks Elizabeth. Charlotte Lucas A close friend of Elizabeth's. She weds Mr. Collins for security, not love, but nevertheless finds happiness in her situation. Sir William Lucas Charlotte's father, foolishly obsessed with rank. Charlotte is the eldest daughter of Sir William and Lady Lucas, the Bennets’ neighbours at Longbourn. She is a plain, sensible woman, 27 years old and not yet married. This worries her brothers, who will have to support her if she remains single, and is also preventing her younger sisters from ‘coming out’ and having their chance to find a husband. Charlotte is Elizabeth Bennet’s particular friend and her role is to present the practical, unromantic view of marriage. She believes ‘happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 6, p. 17) but Elizabeth does not take Charlotte seriously when she advises how Jane should ‘secure’ Bingley (pp. 16–17). Their friendship is severely tested when Charlotte accepts Mr Collins just a few days after he has been rejected by Elizabeth. Charlotte tells Elizabeth, ‘I am not romantic you know. I never was. I ask only a comfortable home’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 22, p. 105). Elizabeth’s long visit to Hunsford Parsonage (Vol. 2, Chs. 5–15) enables her and the reader to notice some of the strategies by which Charlotte makes her home comfortable – such as persuading her husband to take up gardening. Charlotte and Elizabeth’s friendship is repaired but it will never be the same and Elizabeth feels ever closer to her refined and sensitive sister Jane. Although we can infer that Charlotte has made the best choice she can, Elizabeth and Jane will make marriages that offer romance as well as a ‘comfortable home’. TOP TIP Charlotte continues to listen patiently to Mr Collins. Elizabeth assumes this is out of simple kindness but Charlotte has an ulterior motive. Charlotte’s plan succeeds. Mr Collins proposes to her and she accepts. The Lucas family are delighted.

10

Lydia

the youngest Bennet sister

Mrs Bennet's favourtite daughter

a 'determined flirt'

pretty

silly and impulsive

only 15 years old

obsessed with army officers, whose presence in Meryton influce her greatly

 

 

Lydia Bennet The youngest of the Bennet sisters, Lydia is a vain, empty-headed flirt who has never had to deal with the consequences of her actions. She is her mother's favorite. Catherine (Kitty) Bennet The second youngest of the Bennet sisters. A bit of a whiner, she tends to follow Lydia. Lydia is the youngest of the five Bennet sisters – fifteen years old at the start of the novel. Her main importance is to the theme of marriage, which she appears to take extremely lightly, ignoring Wickham’s financial position – the polar opposite of Charlotte Lucas. Clearly she is physically attracted to him but could have been equally attracted to any officer in the regiment. A trip to Brighton ‘comprised every possibility of earthly happiness […] she saw herself seated beneath a tent, tenderly flirting with at least six officers at once’ (Vol. 2, Ch. 18, p. 192). Lydia is presented as loud, assertive and impolite. She harasses Bingley for a ball (Vol. 1, Ch. 9, p. 36), yawns in public (Vol. 1, Ch. 8, p. 86) and spends the money for her sisters’ meal on a bonnet that she does not even like (Vol. 2, Ch. 16, p. 181). She is important to the theme of family too since her bad behaviour damages the reputation of Jane and Elizabeth. When she finally elopes with Wickham she may have ruined her sisters’ chances of marriage ‘for who, as Lady Catherine condescendingly says, will connect themselves with such a family’ (Vol. 3, Ch. 6, p. 244). Lydia’s letter describing her marriage as ‘a good joke’ (Vol. 3, Ch. 5, p. 239) reveals her lack of seriousness, but also that she did expect to marry Wickham – whereas he had no intention of marrying her. Lydia behaves with particular insensitivity towards Jane (Vol. 3, Ch. 9, p. 260) and is not a character who has the capacity to learn or change: ‘Lydia was Lydia still; untamed, unabashed, wild, noisy, and fearless’ (p. 259). It is not surprising that she is her mother’s favourite child as they are very much alike. Task: Discuss Jane Austen’s comic presentation of Lydia Bennet. Think about: The incident in Meryton when she and Kitty meet Jane and Elizabeth on their return from London Her return home as a married woman Austen presents Lydia as naive and thoughtless in a variety of ways: Repetition of ‘laugh(ing)’ shows Lydia’s inability to take things seriously Her reference to not sending word to Longbourn shows lack of judgement and proper family feeling. Jane reports how badly their parents were affected by the ‘joke’ Her letter shows Lydia expected Wickham to marry her – ‘When I sign my name Lydia Wickham’; seems not to think about money at all Elsewhere in the novel Lydia is presented as loud, brash, physical, well grown (tallest of the sisters), stout; possessing assurance and high animal spirits; interrupting Mr Collins, ‘attacks’ Bingley, yawning openly when tired Mrs Bennet’s favourite; shares her mother’s indiscriminate love of ‘a red coat’ and physical attractiveness at same age Disgrace to her family, unaware that her behaviour affects anyone else. No capacity to change – untamed, unabashed, wild, noisy, fearless Class and manners: not a snob: has no concept of sensitivity or discretion – contrast with Jane and Elizabeth Austen presents Lydia as a shallow young girl for whom the superficial glamour of Brighton represents ‘every possibility of earthly happiness.’ The use of the adjective ‘every’ implies that Lydia is placing all her hopes on immediate pleasure rather than thinking about the long-term consequences, a perspective that will leave her extremely vulnerable to Wickham as we shall see. Themes – Proper behaviour 2 of 2 How does Elizabeth describe Lydia and Kitty to her father? ‘Vain, ignorant, idle, and absolutely uncontrolled  !’ (Vol. 2, Ch. 18, p. 191) Mr Bennet says his youngest daughters are ‘uncommonly foolish’. How does Mrs Bennet show her sympathy with them? ‘I remember the time when I liked a red coat  myself.’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 7, p. 23) Vol 2 is much more focus on Lydia in this section – her noisiness, public bad behaviour, selfishness and insensitivity. On the journey, they stop at a coaching inn where they meet Kitty and Lydia. Lydia tells them that the Militia are moving to Brighton. She is determined to go too. What makes the family begin to worry that Wickham does not plan to marry Lydia? SHOW/HIDE ANSWER Lydia and Wickham would have to reach Gretna Green in Scotland to marry without the proper formalities. Colonel Forster begins to worry about Wickham’s intentions when he can trace them only as far as London. Austen presents two different sides to Lydia in Chapter 18 – a fun-loving teenager ‘tenderly flirting with at least six officers at once’ (p. 192) and a danger to the family: ‘the very great disadvantage to us all, which must arise from the public notice of Lydia’s unguarded and imprudent manner’ (pp. 190–1). How do you view Lydia at this stage in the novel? The chapter about Lydia’s patched up wedding We see how vulnerable Lydia’s position is. Elizabeth attempts to persuade her father not to allow Lydia to go. Lydia’s letter to Mrs Forster presents her elopement as a huge joke. The story of Lydia and Wickham’s elopement challenges our modern understanding. Given that Lydia has reached today’s age of consent (sixteen) it may not seem so shocking that a teenage girl might have sex outside marriage, and so the idea of bribing her partner to marry her seems surprising. However, Lydia has no means of stopping herself getting pregnant and if Wickham were to leave her there would be no guaranteed financial help for her. Even without a child, once she has lost her virginity and her good name, prostitution would be almost the only way in which she could support herself. That is what is meant by ‘come upon the town’ (p. 254). Austen emphasises the unsatisfactory nature of Lydia’s wedding and arrival at Longbourn by considering it from Jane or Elizabeth’s point of view: ‘Jane more especially, who gave Lydia the feelings that should have attended herself had she been the culprit, was wretched in the thought of what her sister must endure’ (p. 259). This emphasises the comic surprise of Lydia’s arrival: ‘Lydia was Lydia still; untamed, unabashed, wild, noisy and fearless’ (p. 259). She, like Mrs Bennet, is a character who is incapable of development. Others, even her sister Kitty, have the capability to learn and to change. Lydia boasts of her married state, declaring that she now takes precedence over Jane at the table and offering to ‘get husbands’ for her sisters. ‘“I thank you for my share of the favour,” said Elizabeth; “but I do not particularly like your way of getting husbands”’ (p. 261).

11

Caroline Bingley and mes hurst

Caroline B

the sister of Mr B

very snobbish, rude, prejudicd and ill-mannered

romantically inclinded towards Mr. Darcy

jealous of Elizabeth

 

 

 

Caroline Bingley Charles Bingley's sister. She cares only about social status and tries to undermine Elizabeth because she wants Darcy for herself. Mrs. Hurst Bingley's other sister. Though married, her views and temperament mirror her sister Caroline's. MINOR CHARACTERS CAROLINE BINGLEY here? ‘They were of a respectable family in the north of England’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 4, p. 11). Caroline demonstrates that money, education, fine clothes and accomplishments do not necessarily make someone refined or sensitive. She and her sister Louisa ‘could describe an entertainment with accuracy, relate an anecdote with humour, and laugh at their acquaintance with spirit’ (Vol. 1, Ch. 11, p. 43). This is a typical example of Austen’s style where a pattern of three phrases is used to lure the reader towards a moral judgement – notice how Caroline often begins talking about someone as soon as they have left the room and has just been heard making unkind fun of the Bennets to Mr Darcy (p. 42). In contrast, Elizabeth is amused by ‘follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies’ (p. 46) but her laughter is private and not unkind. Caroline becomes a comic figure as she pursues Mr Darcy. Frequently she provokes him into breaking his usual polite silence to reveal his true feelings. When she criticises Elizabeth for being ‘brown and coarse’ she eventually makes him so angry that he tells her he considers Elizabeth ‘one of the handsomest women of my acquaintance’ (Vol. 3, Ch. 4, p. 222). « PREVIOUS NEXT » As soon as Elizabeth leaves the dinner table Caroline Bingley begins ‘abusing her’, criticising her manners and appearance. Caroline’s timing is significant as it shows how calculating she is – her mask of politeness drops when Elizabeth is no longer in the room. Her sister, Louisa, joins in: ‘I hope you saw her petticoat, six inches deep in mud.’ This is a good example of Austen focusing on a specific detail to reveal the small-mindedness of these two conceited sisters. All four characters discuss Elizabeth’s walk across the fields. They all have their own perspective on this single incident. Characteristically Bingley focuses on Elizabeth’s ‘affection’ for Jane – who is uppermost in his mind. Caroline tries to use the incident to prejudice Darcy against Elizabeth by assuming the effect Elizabeth’s unladylike behaviour will have. What’s telling here is Darcy’s response ... Caroline gets the opposite of what she’d hoped for. Austen shows up such characters who are petty and false as ultimately failing Caroline does not ‘get her man’ Darcy quite artifice as abhorrent Contrast [Incident later - never seen a person so changed - brown Darcy - suntan Etc He gives the response that Elizabeth Elizabeth and Mrs Gardiner pay an awkward visit to Pemberley. Caroline Bingley shows her jealousy and criticises Elizabeth as soon as she has left. Darcy snaps and praises Elizabeth. Study what Miss Bingley says about Elizabeth in Volume 3, Chapter 3. Where else in the novel does she show her dislike by commenting on her appearance? SHOW/HIDE ANSWER When Elizabeth visits Jane at Netherfield (Vol. 1, Ch. 8, p. 28), Miss Bingley comments to Darcy that Elizabeth’s appearance ‘looked almost wild’. She tries to link Elizabeth’s mud-stained ankles and petticoat to ‘an abominable sort of conceited independence’.

12

Lady Catherine De Bourgh

A very weatlthy lady

the aunt of Mr. Darcy

the owner of Rosings Estate

proud and obsessed with social standing

controlling and domineering

the parton of Mr Collins

opposed to Darcy's interest in Elizbeth, believing him to be 'promised' to her daughter

 

 

 

Lady Catherine de Bourgh Domineering and rich, Lady Catherine meddles in everyone's affairs and cannot tolerate any breach of class rank. Lady Catherine is a key figure in connecting the three volumes. She is first mentioned at Longbourn in Volume 1 by Mr Collins. She has given him his job and he feels it is his duty to repay her in flattery. She is also Mr Darcy’s aunt, so when Elizabeth goes to stay with the Collinses in Volume 2 it is perfectly natural for her to meet Mr Darcy there. In Volume 3, Lady Catherine drives from Kent to Hertfordshire to make Elizabeth promise never to become engaged to Mr Darcy. Elizabeth’s refusal gives Darcy hope that she may care for him and encourages him to propose again. Elizabeth comments: ‘Lady Catherine has been of infinite use, which ought to make her happy, for she loves to be of use’ . (Vol. 3, Ch. 18, p. 316) Austen uses many detailed examples to show her interfering in matters that are not her concern, such as Mr Collins’s cupboard shelves (Vol. 1, Ch. 14, p. 55), Charlotte’s livestock (Vol. 2, Ch. 6, p. 136) and Maria’s packing (Vol. 2, Ch. 15, p. 177). Elizabeth can be admired for being ‘the first creature who had ever dared to trifle with so much dignified impertinence!’ (Vol. 2, Ch. 6, p. Primogeniture (all property going to the oldest son) was usual in Jane Austen’s time but Lady Catherine de Bourgh’s family chose to be outside the male inheritance system – and she is hardly an admirable example. As an unpleasant a character as Austen display last c to be though, she is nevertheless powerful and definite.her wealth gives her power. At Husford We are introduced to Lady Catherine de Bourgh, another caricature. She shows that money and high social class do not necessarily imply refinement or good manners. Her type of pride is snobbery and arrogance. We soon learn that, despite her title, Lady Catherine is every bit as impertinent (rude and nosy) as Mrs Bennet. In the world of Pride and Prejudice it is not good manners to ask too many personal questions of a new acquaintance and Elizabeth is irritated at being asked her age. Lady Catherine’s evident surprise at her refusal to give a direct reply prompts Elizabeth to speculate that she may be the first person to stand up to her. ‘“Upon my word,” said her ladyship, “you give your opinion very decidedly for so young a person”’ (p. 138). Later at dinner at Risings Lady Catherine asks Elizabeth a series of personal questions about herself and her family. Elizabeth resents this but does her best to remain polite. We are introduced to Lady Catherine de Bourgh, another caricature. She shows that money and high social class do not necessarily imply refinement or good manners. Her type of pride is snobbery and arrogance. Elizabeth prepares to return home – ignoring Lady Catherine’s interference. Lady Catherine arrives at Longbourn. She demands that Elizabeth denies that she is engaged to Darcy and promises never to enter such an engagement. Elizabeth refuses. Lady Catherine has set off from Kent to Hertfordshire because she heard ‘a report of a most alarming nature’. This was that Jane was ‘most advantageously’ engaged to Bingley and that Elizabeth might be ‘soon afterwards united’ to Mr Darcy (Vol. 3, Ch. 14, p. 292). It is never made clear where this second part of the rumour has come from. Ironically it is Lady Catherine’s reaction that makes it come true. The confrontation between Lady Catherine and Elizabeth is one of the most strongly written passages of dialogue in the novel. Lady Catherine, who prides herself on her ‘sincerity and frankness’ (p. 292), shows herself to be arrogant and insulting. Elizabeth defends herself by listening carefully to whatever Lady Catherine says and turning it back on her. For example when Lady Catherine asks whether Darcy has made Elizabeth an offer of marriage, Elizabeth is able to avoid giving a direct answer: ‘Your ladyship has declared it to be impossible’ (p. 293). However, when Lady Catherine says that Elizabeth will pollute ‘the shades of Pemberley’ Elizabeth has had enough: ‘You have insulted me, in every possible method’ (p. 296). Lady Catherine is so angry that she refuses to say goodbye: ‘I take no leave of you, Miss Bennet. I send no compliments to your mother. You deserve no such attention’ (p. 297). The rhythmical repetition of ‘no … no … no … ’ is intended to emphasise her anger but only reveals her lack of real power. It is well worth looking at the strong sentence rhythms in this chapter as well as examples of other literary devices such as alliteration, when Lady Catherine accuses Elizabeth of using her ‘arts and allurements’ (p. 293) to draw Darcy in. Though this is obviously rude, it is little different from the way Charlotte suggested earlier that Jane ought to behave to succeed in ‘fixing’ or to ‘secure’ Bingley (Vol. 1, Ch. 11, p. 16).

13

Mary and kitty

Kitty Bennet

the fourth Bennet sister

often caught in the middle of her family discussions  

influenced by Lydia

similar to Lydia, but not her mother's favourite

Mary Bennet

the third Bennet sister

described as "the only plain one in the family"

said by Austen to be the possessor of "neither genius nor taste"

Eager to show off her accomplishments

sometimes seen as an embrassment to the other sisters.

 

 

 

 

 

Don’t ignore the other Bennet sisters, Mary and Kitty. The narrator often seems unkind to them, condemning Mary for her efforts to improve herself and Kitty for being weak in following Lydia. Yet it is clear that part of their problem comes from their father’s poor parenting skills. Both are given a happy ending and the possibility of change. Mary She tries very hard to acquire accomplishments Because she is the plainest of the sisters Mary Bennet The middle child of the five Bennet sisters. Mary is plain looking and a recluse who enjoys lecturing others about morality, which she learns from books. How does Mary Bennet successfully ‘purchase praise and gratitude’ (p. 19)? SHOW/HIDE ANSWER Mary’s piano playing is appreciated when she plays tunes for dancing. The happy ending for Mary Bennet is to be left at home without the competition of her more beautiful sisters.

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Minor characte s

Notice what minor characters, such as Lady Catherine’s daughter Anne and Darcy’s sister Georgiana, show about the people who look after them. Anne hardly speaks though her mother and Mr Collins often talk about her, making ridiculous statements about her beauty and potential talent, whereas Elizabeth sees her as ‘sickly and cross’ (Vol. 2, Ch. 5, p. 132). Georgiana is a more fully developed character. Her brother takes loving care of her though she is too much in awe of him. Mrs Reynolds, the Pemberley housekeeper is a bridge to understanding darcys temperament

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Mr and Mrs. Gardiner

the aunt and uncle of the Bennet girls

able to offer essential assistance after Lydia elopes with Wickham

willing to be seen as the ones who gave Wickham money to marry Lydia in order to keep Darcy's secret

closely involved in the developing relatinship between Darcy and Elizabeth

 

 

 

Mrs. Gardiner Mrs. Bennet's sister-in-law. Intelligent and caring, she is the mother that Elizabeth and Jane cannot find in Mrs. Bennet. Mr. Gardiner Mrs. Bennet's brother and a successful, warm-hearted, cultivated merchant. The Gardiners provide a positive perspective on family life. They are an example of a good marriage and sensitive responsible parenting. The conventions of Austen’s time enabled relationships to progress at a careful pace. Understanding of the conventions was shared between members of a social class. For instance, the Gardiners are quick to notice that the Darcys have called sooner than normal. Being invited to dine at Pemberley is a significant step forward in friendship so Mrs Gardiner is anxious to know whether Elizabeth is comfortable with this. Good manners include being careful not to intrude into other people’s private feelings. The Gardiners are a good example of this sensitivity (unlike Lady Catherine or Mrs Bennet): ‘They saw much to interest, but nothing to justify enquiry’ (p. 216).

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The Lucas fam

Lady Lucas Charlotte's mother. s minor characters. Charlotte’s father, Sir William Lucas, is a kindly but comic character. He has been knighted for his services as Mayor of Meryton and his life has changed from that day. He tries to behave as a gracious courtier but is completely overawed by wealth and power when he meets Lady Catherine de Bourgh.

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Colonel and mrs Forster

Colonel Forster The leader of Wickham's regiment. Mrs. Forster Colonel Forster's wife. She irresponsibly aids Lydia in her elopement with Wickham.

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Mr and mrs Philips

Mrs. Philips Mrs. Bennet's shallow silly sister. The gossip queen of Meryton.

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Col Fitzwilliam

Colonel Fitzwilliam Darcy's cousin and Georgiana's guardian. He's a model gentleman, though as a second son he lacks any inheritance and so must seek out money through marriage.

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Miss de Bourgh

Miss de Bourgh Lady Catherine's sickly daughter. Her mother intends for Darcy to marry her.

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Georgians Darcy

Darcy's younger sister.

extremely pretty

very shy

very musical

naively falls for mr Wickham's charme and nearly elopes with him

devoted to her brother

 

 

Georgiana is a shy, good-spirited person whom Elizabeth wrongly dislikes until they meet and become friends. Georgiana has her own scandalous history with Wickham.

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Minor characters Neighbourhood

 

Notice how skilfully and quickly the existence of the neighbours (Mrs Long and the Lucases) and the importance of their opinions are established in the brief opening chapter. As the novel progresses the neighbourhood almost becomes an additional character itself. Never overlook Jane Austen’s minor characters. Charlotte’s father, Sir William Lucas, is a kindly but comic character. He has been knighted for his services as Mayor of Meryton and his life has changed from that day. He tries to behave as a gracious courtier but is completely overawed by wealth and power when he meets Lady Catherine de Bourgh. It can sometimes help you extend your thinking if you consider what is not included in Pride and Prejudice. All writers and artists have to choose their special focus and this always means excluding other possibilities. Austen concentrates so narrowly on the leisured social class that working people are almost invisible. This does not mean that they are insignificant. At Rosings the servants are listed as if they were possessions or objects: ‘such rooms, so many servants and so splendid a dinner’ (p. 133) whereas at Pemberley the housekeeper plays a small but important role praising Mr Darcy. She says, ‘There is not one of his tenants or servants but what will give him a good name’ (Vol. 3, Ch. 1, p. 204). Check back over the moments when a new character is introduced. There is often a surprisingly large amount of information concerning their money or their relatives. This reflects the smaller social world of Jane Austen’s times. Strangers were less common than they are today and proper introductions were important. Somehow Wickham has slipped through this protective net. It is not only Elizabeth who has been fooled by him – so has the ‘neighbourhood’ (p. 171). And the neighbourhood judged Darcy wrongly too, when he first appeared at the Meryton Assembly. Austen supports social conventions (such as correct introductions) but often satirises the changing nature and mistakes of The almost complete absence of characters from different social classes in Pride and Prejudice makes Austen’s decision to use the housekeeper significant. ‘I have never had a cross word from him in my life, and I’ve known him since he was four years old,’ she says (p. 203). Her list of Darcy’s good qualities includes his devotion to his sister, generosity to the poor and excellence as a master and landlord.

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Using characters to contrast and display main characters

An author can develop main characters by showing them in relationship to others. Here Caroline Bingley, a minor character, interrupts Darcy with constant flattery as he tries to write a letter. We are implicitly invited to contrast this with Elizabeth’s quickness of thought and independent spirit. Darcy is polite but also determined – we can see that he is a strong personality. In order to flatter him, Caroline is prepared to denigrate her own brother, criticising his ‘careless’ letter writing (p. 38). Bingley’s response shows his gentle nature and Elizabeth is unexpectedly tactful as she tries to soothe possible hurt feelings. Austen introduces narrative moments that reveal a great deal about relationships, status and power. Consider how Darcy perceives the Bingley sisters’ rudeness when they turn onto a path which is too narrow to allow Elizabeth to walk beside them. This simple event is both poignant and telling in terms of plot and character development.

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Myers Briggs Elizabethand darcy

Personality Type: INTJ Dominate Function: Introverted Intuition Darcy is the classic introvert, he dislikes large crowds of strangers and finds large-scale socialization difficult.  However, his introverted intuition makes him very perceptive. After only a short time with someone, he makes keen observations and pieces together someone’s character.  While at Netherfield, he comments on Elizabeth’s personality and flaws after having known her for a few days at most.  He gets much more out of social gatherings by observing people from afar than he does by directly engaging them in conversation.  Interestingly, he and Elizabeth share this dominant function, and therefore both stick very closely to their early impressions of a person. This is, of course, one of the biggest obstacles in the development of their relationship. Auxiliary Function: Extraverted Thinking When Darcy does speak out loud, he is far more comfortable talking about logic, reason, and events than he is with feelings – and noticeably more comfortable in smaller groups.  He can reason out loud and explain how things, or people, work – why something makes sense or doesn’t make sense, why he did or did not do something.  Darcy uses his intuitive understanding of situations to inform his decision-making, and then acts on what makes the most sense.  He takes action to separate Bingley from Jane Bennet when he believes she doesn’t return his affections, and keeps them from communicating even when she’s in London.  He also springs into action when the crisis with Lydia and Wickham comes up, and takes care of the situation while keeping it quiet.  He’s a great organizer, orchestrator, and analyzer. Tertiary Function: Introverted Feeling While not as vocal about it, Darcy is every bit as opinionated as Elizabeth.  He has his own set of values, largely based on his attachments and close relationships to people.  He doesn’t pay much attention to people he doesn’t deeply care for, and can be very dismissive – as with Caroline Bingley.  Internally he can form deep attachments, as he does quietly and over time with Elizabeth.  He is also an adept judge of character, and has a good sense of when someone may or may not be sincere.  Even though he communicates in more logical terms and comes off as aloof, he is visibly stung by Elizabeth’s harsh words in a number of scenes and keeps this generally to himself. Inferior Function: Extraverted Sensing With all of his observing, feeling, and introverted processing going on, Darcy can seem extremely aloof.  Which makes perfect sense – most of the time he’s not very “present” and more focused on a specific person or idea than his general surroundings.  He makes more of his judgments based on his inferences than on the strict facts of what he’s observed.  However, he does seem to enjoy being out and about by himself, enjoying the surroundings of various grounds.  Generally however, he seems to be much more an abstract person than an in-the-moment one. Hogwarts House: Gryffindor Darcy is extremely introverted and rational, but also very brave and stubborn.  Even when he knows he’s done something he probably shouldn’t be proud of, he owns up to it and doesn’t deny it.  If he deems it necessary or appropriate, he makes amends.  Once made, he stands by his convictions and judgments.  He is very protective of the people he cares about, and always looking out for their welfare – he takes decisive action in order to protect his friend Bingley, his sister Georgiana, and his future wife Elizabeth.  He is chivalrous and brave at heart, all very Gryffindor traits. mr. darcy pride and prejudice pride & prejudice novels films gryffindor intj 189 notes Sep 28th, 2012 Elizabeth Bennet Requested by Anonymous Personality Type: INFJ Dominant Function: Introverted Intuition Elizabeth relies heavily on her first impression of a person.  She judges people based on the impression she gets of that person, rather than what the facts or even other people may tell her.  She strongly dislikes Mr. Darcy and the Bingley sisters upon first meeting them, even though they are sophisticated and well-mannered.  On the other hand, she takes a strong liking to Mr. Wickham and readily believes his side of the story with Mr. Darcy, even when Jane points out that she doesn’t actually know either of them very well yet.  She even states that she believes in first impressions and goes by her feelings or sense of people rather than what the evidence may indicate. She is very opinionated and doesn’t censor herself to comfort the people she doesn’t care to please.   Auxiliary Function: Extraverted Feeling Once her feelings or opinions on a person or idea have been settled, Elizabeth makes no bones about hiding them.  While often called the wittier of the two, she is actually just as much if not more romantic than her sister Jane.  While Jane states that she would like to marry for love but acknowledges that this might be unrealistic, Elizabeth is adamant that she won’t consider marrying anyone she is not deeply in love with.  When upset, she acts and speaks on her feelings rather than logic, and can get very passionate about what she says.  Elizabeth is very sociable and outgoing, witty and charming in social settings and with a good sense of propriety and perception.  In fact, she is probably the most socially-conscious member of her family. Tertiary Function: Introverted Thinking Elizabeth is a very witty and intelligent person.  She pursues many hobbies including piano and reading, and does so in large part for her own satisfaction and curiosity.  Lizzie often enjoys time to herself to think things over – walks around Rosings Park or Longbourn, for example.  She is great at understanding situations and systems when her feelings on the matter don’t cloud her judgment.  However, this skill also helps her to overcome her judgments and understand the actual circumstances of what happend with Wickham and Darcy. Inferior Function: Extraverted Sensing Elizabeth can be a very in-the-moment person.  She enjoys walks – both solitary and with others – to enjoy the beauty of the woods and landscape.  She often makes snap decisions, disregarding what the consequences or opinions of others might be.  Often with her emotional nature, she can say things in heated moments that come across as harsh, and are usually reactions to something that has happened in the moment. Hogwarts House: Gryffindor Elizabeth is a woman of great convictions and with plenty of courage to express them.  She is not easily intimidated, and sometimes others’ attempts to intimidate or coerce her make her more determined and brave as a result.  She is stubborn and prideful, willing to stand up for herself and other people even if it means offending others or doing something that may be looked down upon.  Elizabeth is unafraid to challenge other people, even pointing out flaws and cruelty in Mr. Darcy when he is both a male and of superior socioeconomic status to her own.  Elizabeth is a classic Gryffindor, brave and stubborn, rarely intimidated. elizabeth bennet films gryffindor infj mtbi novels pride and prejudice pride & prejudice 265 notes Although a large part of Pride and Prejudice revolves around the differences between Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy, in terms of psychological type they are really quite similar. They share three out of four preferences—introversion, intuition, and judgment—differing only on the thinking-feeling dimension. Mr. Darcy’s introversion is quite clear. After the Meryton ball, where his reserve is evident, Jane reports, “‘Miss Bingley told me . . . that he never speaks much unless among his intimate acquaintance. With them he is remarkably agreeable’” (19). Introverts tend to communicate best—and with most pleasure—with a small circle of close friends.2 Elizabeth’s introversion is not as obvious because she enjoys and feels comfortable in society, but a closer look finds her frequently in moments of internal reflection. She often escapes to a copse or lane to think things over, as when she reads the letters from Mr. Darcy and Mrs. Gardiner. In addition, her “love for solitary walks” (182), her friendly banter that often hides her true feelings, and her intimate conversations with Jane, to whom alone she reveals her deepest feelings, all bespeak a preference for introversion. Elizabeth and Darcy also demonstrate a preference for intuition. Elizabeth’s character-studying itself is an intuitive activity, for it involves fitting bits of conversation and behavior into a general pattern. Intuitive types also tend to enjoy hypothetical discussions, such as the consideration of whether it is better to follow a friend’s advice or to be guided by one’s own convictions that engages Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy during their stay at Netherfield. Mr. Bingley, a sensing type, quickly becomes impatient with the discussion and interrupts it. In addition, Elizabeth and Darcy both prefer judging to perception. They soon know what they think of a given situation and, having thus determined, are not easily convinced otherwise. When Darcy determines to observe and interfere in Jane and Bingley’s relationship, he spends just one evening watching for signs of Jane’s affection before arriving at his verdict. Similarly, while at Netherfield Elizabeth finds “what passed between Darcy and his companion [Miss Bingley]” to be “exactly in unison with her opinion of each” (47). That her observations accord with her ideas presupposes that she has made a judgment. Although both she and Mr. Darcy use their judging functions regularly, their preferred methods of judging differ. The best demonstration of Elizabeth’s and Darcy’s contrasting styles of judgment comes with their analysis of Mr. Bingley’s hypothetical behavior, should he decide to quit Netherfield but be asked by a friend to postpone his departure. Elizabeth asks Mr. Darcy whether he would consider “‘obstinacy in adhering to [his plan]’” a virtue (49), and the following conversation ensues: “[Y]ou must remember, Miss Bennet, that the friend who is supposed to desire his return to the house, and the delay of the plan, has merely desired it, asked it without offering one argument in favour of its propriety.” “To yield readily—easily—to the persuasion of a friend is no merit with you.” “To yield without conviction is no compliment to the understanding of either.” “You appear to me, Mr. Darcy, to allow nothing for the influence of friendship and affection. A regard for the requester would often make one readily yield to a request, without waiting for arguments to reason one into it.” (50) This is a classic dialogue between a thinking type and a feeling type, each defending his or her method of judging. It does not mean that Elizabeth always acts according to the wishes of her friends, without conviction, or that Darcy always acts according to his convictions, without regard to his friends, but it is clear that they each have one way of making decisions—Elizabeth through feeling and Darcy through thinking—that they prefer, defend, and best understand.3 An actual incident where their differences in judgment come into play concerns their reactions towards the relationship between Mr. Bingley and Jane, and in particular, Mr. Darcy’s role in separating them. Elizabeth judges what he has done according to Jane’s feelings, and rebukes him for “‘ruining, perhaps forever, the happiness of a most beloved sister’” (190). Darcy is unmoved, still convinced of the better value of the logic that has guided his decisions. In his letter to Elizabeth he further explains that he truly believed Jane to be indifferent “‘on impartial conviction’” (198)—a hallmark of a thinking type. The methods of judgment, feeling and thinking, not only reflect the personalities of Elizabeth and Darcy, but they also showcase one of the main themes of the book, as capsulated in its title. Excessive reliance on logical analysis, especially one’s own analysis, can be considered a form of pride. Likewise, decisions based on the gut reactions of feeling, especially when stubbornly adhered to, bear a marked resemblance to prejudice. (Actually, Mr. Darcy’s “pride” and Elizabeth’s “prejudice” are very much akin to one another, and Isabel Myers’s definition of prejudice, “a pre-judgment impervious to perception” [70], could apply equally well to thinking types and feeling types.) Elizabeth’s over-reliance on her feeling-judgment, her prejudice, leads her to evaluate Darcy before she really knows him. She dislikes him initially because she has overheard him criticize her. Having judged him, she stops using her perceptive function to learn more about him. When, at the Netherfield ball, Mr. Darcy asks Elizabeth to suspend her judgment of him, she replies, “‘if I do not take your likeness now, I may never have another opportunity’” (94). She also rejects the information Jane has gathered—Mr. Bingley’s defense of his friend—and says, “‘[Y]ou must excuse my not being convinced by assurances only. . . . I shall venture still to think . . . as I did before’” (96). After reading Darcy’s letter, however, Elizabeth finally opens herself up to her intuitive perceptions. She remembers that he is “esteemed and valued” by his friends, that he speaks affectionately of his sister, and that she had never “seen any thing that spoke him to be unprincipled or unjust” (207) and cannot think of Darcy “without feeling that she had been blind, partial, prejudiced, absurd” (208). “Blind” is precisely the word Isabel Myers uses to describe “judgment with no perception” (182). Similarly, Darcy’s logical thinking-function originally argues against his love for Elizabeth. When he proposes the first time, he forthrightly details “his sense of her inferiority—of its being a degradation—of the family obstacles which judgment had always opposed to inclination” (189). At this point, he is not really ready to love Elizabeth, for he does not consider her to be his equal. Before this relationship can work, his judgment, as well as his perception, must agree that Elizabeth is his choice—because of her worthiness, not despite her lack of it. That his thinking-judgment does change is evident in his eventual acknowledgement that Elizabeth has taught him “‘a lesson, hard indeed at first, but most advantageous’” (369). In the course of this lesson, he has learned the true value of Elizabeth and the inconsequence of the other concerns that previously caused him such struggles. To marry Elizabeth is now both the intuitive and the logical wish of his heart. Although psychologically speaking Mr. Darcy is not ready to marry Elizabeth when he first proposes, her refusal and his subsequent letter mark the turning point in the novel because these events open the way for their further type development and show each a glimpse of the other’s point of view. As the novel progresses, Darcy and Elizabeth begin to find a balance between their perceptive and judging functions. In addition, they learn from each other about “the other way” to judge and come to appreciate the other’s strengths in type. Elizabeth, when reading Mr. Darcy’s letter, is especially distressed by his accusation of Wickham, “the more so, as she could bring no proof of its injustice” (205). Looking for proof implies logical thinking, and justice is something that thinking-types generally value highly. As Elizabeth comes to love Mr. Darcy, she gains a “respect created by the conviction of his valuable qualities” (265), qualities that undoubtedly include the “strength, presence of mind in crisis, steadiness” (Myers 131) that Isabel Myers attributes to thinkers. These qualities are especially evident in Darcy’s involvement with Lydia and Wickham, for which Elizabeth is particularly grateful. Elizabeth’s feeling-oriented assessment of Darcy’s behavior and manners (clearly delineated in her refusal of his first proposal) at the same time leads him to re-evaluate himself, using more of her judging process. Once he and Elizabeth understand one another, he says, “‘you showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased’” (369). He has learned that looking at something by how it affects and pleases or displeases others can be a valuable indication of its worth. He also comes to appreciate Elizabeth for her feeling judgment. When she asks him to account for his love of her, he cites her “‘affectionate behaviour to Jane, while she was ill’” (380) as evidence of her goodness. Elizabeth’s decision to walk the three miles to Netherfield in the mud in order to Elizabeth recognizes how much she and Darcy have yet to learn from each other: “by her ease and liveliness, his mind might have been softened, his manners improved, and from his judgment, information, and knowledge of the world, she must have received benefit of greater importance” (312). They will not suddenly change places on the personality chart, however. As Richard McKeon says in his article “Pride and Prejudice: Thought, Character, Argument, and Plot,” “Elizabeth underwent a change of feeling as she freed herself of prejudices. Darcy underwent a change in his view of the spirit in which the letter was written” (515, italics mine). Feeling is still natural to Elizabeth, and thinking to Mr. Darcy, but each has come to appreciate the other’s way of judging as valid and valuable and has learned that a balance of perception and judgment guards against falling into either pride or prejudice. Elizabeth and Darcy, having “‘settled between [them] already, that [they] are to be the happiest couple in the world’” (373), are well on their way. Elizabeth begins to read ‘With a strong prejudice against every thing he might say’ (p. 169) but Darcy has appealed to her ‘justice’ instead of her ‘feelings’ (p. 162). Her first reading of the letter is emotional but crucially she takes it out and reads it again more carefully and rationally. She ‘commanded herself so far as to examine the meaning of every sentence’ (p. 170 – a good tip!). This time she is not judging on first impressions. She realises how prejudiced she has been.

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Colonel and Mrs Foster