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Eng Lit 2 B Pride and Prejudice > H. Quotes > Flashcards

Flashcards in H. Quotes Deck (14)
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How to use quotations

One of the secrets of success in writing exam essays is to use quotations effectively. There are five basic principles: Quote only what is most useful. Do not use a quotation that repeats what you have just written. Put quotation marks, e.g. ‘ ’, around the quotation. Write the quotation exactly as it appears in the original. Use the quotation so that it fits neatly into your sentence.

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ALL QUOTES

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Chapter 1 quotes

Vol 1

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families that he is considered as the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters. The Narrator

“Mr. Bennet, how can you abuse your own children in such a way! You take delight in vexing me. You have no compassion on my poor nerves.” Mrs. Bennet. “You mistake me, my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends. I have heard you mention them with consideration these twenty years at least.” Mr. Bennet

She (Mrs. Bennet) was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper. When she was discontented she fancied herself nervous. The business of her life was to get her daughters married; its solace was visiting and news. The Narrator

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Chapter 2 quotes

Vol 1

“She (Mrs. Long) is a selfish, hypocritical woman, and I have no opinion of her.” Mrs. Bennet

What say you, Mary? for you are a young lady of deep reflection, I know, and read great books and make extracts.”

Mary wished to say something very sensible, but knew not how. Mr. Bennet & the Narrator

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Chapter 3 quotes

Vol 1

To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love. The Narrator

 

Mr. Darcy soon drew the attention of the room by his fine, tall person, handsome features, noble mien, and the report, which was in general circulation within five minutes after his entrance, of his having ten thousand a year. The gentlemen pronounced him to be a fine figure of a man, the ladies declared he was much handsomer than Mr. Bingley, and he was looked at with great admiration for about half the evening, till his manners gave a disgust which turned the tide of his popularity; for he was discovered to be proud, to be above his company, and above being pleased; and not all his large estate in Derbyshire could then save him from having a most forbidding, disagreeable countenance, and being unworthy to be compared with his friend. The Narrator

 

His character was decided. He was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and every body hoped that he would never come there again. The Narrator

 

“She is tolerable; but not handsome enough to tempt me; and I am in no humour at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men. You had better return to your partner and enjoy her smiles, for you are wasting your time with me.” Mr. Darcy

 

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Chapter 4 quotes

Vol 1

But that is one great difference between us. Compliments always take you by surprise, and me never. Elizabeth to Jane Bennet

 

They were in fact very fine ladies; not deficient in good-humour when they were pleased, nor in the power of being agreeable where they chose it, but proud and conceited. They were rather handsome, had been educated in one of the first private seminaries in town, had a fortune of twenty thousand pounds, were in the habit of spending more than they ought, and of associating with people of rank, and were therefore in every respect entitled to think well of themselves, and meanly of others. They were of a respectable family in the north of England; a circumstance more deeply impressed on their memories than that their brother’s fortune and their own had been acquired by trade. The Narrator on the Bingley sisters

 

Darcy was clever. He was at the same time haughty, reserved, and fastidious, and his manners, though well-bred, were not inviting. The Narrator

 

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Chapter 5 quotes

Vol 1

“I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.” Elizabeth Bennet

“Pride,” observed Mary, who piqued herself upon the solidity of her reflections, “is a very common failing, I believe. By all that I have ever read, I am convinced that it is very common indeed; that human nature is particularly prone to it, and that there are very few of us who do not cherish a feeling of self-complacency on the score of some quality or other, real or imaginary. Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonimously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.” Mary Bennet

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Chapter 6 quotes

vol 1

“In nine cases out of ten a woman had better show more affection than she feels.” Charlotte Lucas

“Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other, or ever so similar before-hand, it does not advance their felicity in the least. They always continue to grow sufficiently unlike afterwards to have their share of vexation; and it is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life.” Charlotte Lucas

Mr. Darcy had at first scarcely allowed her to be pretty; he had looked at her without admiration at the ball; and when they next met, he looked at her only to criticise. But no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she had hardly a good feature in her face, than he began to find it was rendered uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes. The Narrator

“He (Mr. Darcy) has a very satirical eye, and if I do not begin by being impertinent myself, I shall soon grow afraid of him.” Elizabeth Bennet

“You are a very strange creature by way of a friend!” Elizabeth Bennet to Charlotte Lucas

Mary had neither genius nor taste; and though vanity had given her application, it had given her likewise a pedantic air and conceited manner, which would have injured a higher degree of excellence than she had reached. The Narrator

“A lady’s imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony, in a moment. I knew you would be wishing me joy” Mr. Darcy

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Chapter 7 quotes

vol 1

“Well, my dear,” said Mr. Bennet, when Elizabeth had read the note aloud, “if your daughter should have a dangerous fit of illness — if she should die, it would be a comfort to know that it was all in pursuit of Mr. Bingley, and under your orders.” Mr. Bennet

“Oh! I am not at all afraid of her dying. People do not die of little trifling colds. She will be taken good care of. As long as she stays there, it is all very well. I would go and see her if I could have the carriage.” Mrs. Bennet

“No, indeed. I do not wish to avoid the walk. The distance is nothing when one has a motive; only three miles.” Elizabeth Bennet

“I admire the activity of your benevolence,” observed Mary, “but every impulse of feeling should be guided by reason; and, in my opinion, exertion should always be in proportion to what is required.” Mary bennet

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Chapter 8 quotes

“To walk three miles, or four miles, or five miles, or whatever it is, above her ancles in dirt, and alone, quite alone! what could she mean by it? It seems to me to shew an abominable sort of conceited independence, a most country-town indifference to decorum.” Caroline Bingley

 

“Miss Eliza Bennet,” said Miss Bingley, “despises cards. She is a great reader, and has no pleasure in anything else.”

 

“I deserve neither such praise nor such censure,” cried Elizabeth; “I am not a great reader, and I have pleasure in many things.”

 

“no one can be really esteemed accomplished who does not greatly surpass what is usually met with. A woman must have a thorough knowledge of music, singing, drawing, dancing, and the modern languages, to deserve the word; and besides all this, she must possess a certain something in her air and manner of walking, the tone of her voice, her address and expressions, or the word will be but half deserved.” Caroline Bingley

 

“All this she must possess,” added Darcy, “and to all this she must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading.” Mr. Darcy

 

“I am no longer surprised at your knowing only six accomplished women. I rather wonder now at your knowing any.” Elizabeth Bennet

 

“Eliza Bennet,” said Miss Bingley, when the door was closed on her, “is one of those young ladies who seek to recommend themselves to the other sex by undervaluing their own; and with many men, I dare say, it succeeds. But, in my opinion, it is a paltry device, a very mean art.” Caroline Bingley

 

“there is meanness in all the arts which ladies sometimes condescend to employ for captivation. Whatever bears affinity to cunning is despicable.” Mr. Darcy

 

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Chapter 9

vol 1

“When I am in the country,” he replied, “I never wish to leave it; and when I am in town, it is pretty much the same. They have each their advantages, and I can be equally happy in either.” Charles Bingley

“I (Elizabeth Bennet) wonder who first discovered the efficacy of poetry in driving away love!”

“I have been used to consider poetry as the food of love,” said Darcy.

“Of a fine, stout, healthy love it may. Everything nourishes what is strong already. But if it be only a slight, thin sort of inclination, I am convinced that one good sonnet will starve it entirely away.” Elizabeth Bennet

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Chapter 10

vol 1

“It is a rule with me that a person who can write a long letter with ease cannot write ill.” Caroline Bingley

“Your humility, Mr. Bingley,” said Elizabeth, “must disarm reproof.”

“Nothing is more deceitful,” said Darcy, “than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast.”

“The power of doing anything with quickness is always much prized by the possessor, and often without any attention to the imperfection of the performance.” Mr. Darcy

“Oh!” said she, “I heard you before, but I could not immediately determine what to say in reply. You wanted me, I know, to say ‘Yes,’ that you might have the pleasure of despising my taste; but I always delight in overthrowing those kind of schemes, and cheating a person of their premeditated contempt. I have, therefore, made up my mind to tell you, that I do not want to dance a reel at all — and now despise me if you dare.” Elizabeth Bennet

Elizabeth, having rather expected to affront him (Mr. Darcy), was amazed at his gallantry; but there was a mixture of sweetness and archness in her manner which made it difficult for her to affront anybody, and Darcy had never been so bewitched by any woman as he was by her. He really believed that, were it not for the inferiority of her connexions, he should be in some danger. The Narrator

“No, no; stay where you are. You are charmingly grouped, and appear to uncommon advantage. The picturesque would be spoilt by admitting a fourth. Good-bye.” Elizabeth Bennet

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Chapter 11

vol 1

“I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book!” Caroline Bingley

“Mr. Darcy is not to be laughed at!” cried Elizabeth. “That is an uncommon advantage, and uncommon I hope it will continue, for it would be a great loss to me to have many such acquaintance. I dearly love a laugh.” Elizabeth Bennet

“The wisest and the best of men — nay, the wisest and best of their actions — may be rendered ridiculous by a person whose first object in life is a joke.” Caroline Bingley

“I hope I never ridicule what is wise or good. Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies, do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.” Elizabeth Bennet

“Yes, vanity is a weakness indeed. But pride — where there is a real superiority of mind, pride will be always under good regulation.” Mr. Darcy

“Mr. Darcy has no defect. He owns it himself without disguise.” Elizabeth Bennet

“My good opinion once lost is lost for ever.” Mr. Darcy

“There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil — a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome.” Mr. Darcy

“And your defect is a propensity to hate everybody.” Elizabeth Bennet

“And yours,” he replied, with a smile, “is wilfully to misunderstand them.” Mr. Darcy

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Chapter 12

vol 1

To Mr. Darcy it was welcome intelligence: Elizabeth had been at Netherfield long enough. She attracted him more than he liked — and Miss Bingley was uncivil to her, and more teasing than usual to himself. The Narrator

They found Mary, as usual, deep in the study of thorough bass and human nature; and had some new extracts to admire, and some new observations of thread-bare morality to listen to. The Narrator