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Flashcards in CA State Law questions Deck (53)
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1

Of the ocular conditions treatable by an optometrist in California and worked in conjunction with an ophthalmologist, if a condition is getting WORSE, what must you do?
A. Refer
B. Consult
C. Monitor

B. Consult

2

Of the ocular conditions treatable by an optometrist in California and worked in conjunction with an ophthalmologist, if a condition is recurring, what must you do?
A. Refer
B. Consult
C. Monitor

B. Consult; except for idiopathic iritis must refer if reoccurrence occurs within 1 year.

3

Of the ocular conditions treatable by an optometrist in California and worked in conjunction with an ophthalmologist, if a condition is NOT IMPROVING, what must you do?
A. Refer
B. Consult
C. Monitor

A. Refer

4

Of the ocular conditions treatable by an optometrist in California and worked in conjunction with an ophthalmologist, if a patient is still on medication, what must you do?
A. Refer
B. Consult
C. Monitor

A. Refer

5

When any condition is NOT RESOLVING, will you need to refer/consult or can either occur?
A. Refer
B. Consult
C. Could be either

C. Could be either, depending on the condition

6

When a condition is NOT RESOLVING, sometimes an OD must consult and sometimes they must refer. If the condition is episcleritis or idiopathic iritis, do you refer or consult and when?
A. Refer after 1 week
B. Consult after 1 week
C. Refer after 3 weeks
D. Consult after 3 weeks
E. Refer after 6 weeks

D. Consult after 3 weeks

7

When a condition is NOT RESOLVING, sometimes an OD must consult and sometimes they must refer. If the condition is HSV, HZV (keratitis, conjunctivitis, dermatitis), do you refer or consult and when?
A. Refer after 1 week
B. Consult after 1 week
C. Refer after 3 weeks
D. Consult after 3 weeks
E. Refer after 6 weeks

C. Refer after 3 weeks

8

When a condition is NOT RESOLVING, sometimes an OD must consult and sometimes they must refer. If the condition is traumatic iritis, do you refer or consult and when?
A. Refer after 1 week
B. Consult after 1 week
C. Refer after 3 weeks
D. Consult after 3 weeks
E. Refer after 6 weeks

A. Refer after 1 week

9

Pain persisting after 3 days when a patient is on a class III oral narcotic requires an ophthalmologist's involvement in what way?
A. Referral after 5 days
B. Referral after 3 days
C. Consultation after 5 days
D. Consultation after 3 days

B. Referral after 3 days

10

A central corneal ulcer that is NOT IMPROVING after 48hrs...
A. Should be consulted with an OMD
B. Should be referred to an OMD
C. Referred to an OMD after 72 hours not 48 hours

B. Should be referred to an OMD

11

None of the following are permitted for children under age 12, except:
a. Treating episcleritis
b. Treating dacryocystitis
c. Treating scleritis
d. Lacrimal dilation and irrigation

a. Treating episcleritis

12

Patient reports red, itchy eyes, mildly swollen lids, mucous discharge and runny nose. You diagnose allergic blepharo- conjunctivitis and rhinitis. As a component of the treatment regimen you prescribe a topical steroid and Allegra- an oral antihistamine. Under the circumstances, which of the following is not true:
a. No restrictions for using oral antihistamine
b. Need to consult if condition is worse in 21 days
c. Need to refer if patient is still on steroid after 21 days
d. None are true

c. Need to refer if patient is still on steroid after 21 days

13

With respect to glaucoma certified OD, all the following statements are true, except:
a. OD can treat POAG on patients older than 18
b. OD can treat secondary glaucomas such as
phacomorphic or neovascular
c. OD must refer ACG after stabilizing attack
d. OD must consult with PCP before initiating any
treatment of diabetic patient

b. OD can treat secondary glaucomas such as phacomorphic or neovascular

14

Your patient recently had cataract surgery of left eye. At 1 week post-op visit complains of a painful red eye. Patient had been prescribed a steroid on QID basis and antibiotic; After a thorough evaluation, you decide that the patient has an A/C inflammation. What is your best course of action?
a. Change frequency of steroid from QID to Q2H
b. Prescribe pain meds
c. Consult with surgeon
d. Both a and b

c. Consult with surgeon

15

Patient is seen for first time with a painful red eye for one week. He reports being hit on the eye with a basketball. You diagnose a subconj heme and TRAUMATIC IRITIS and prescribe a cycloplegic and a steroid. Which of the following is most appropriate:
a. Ask patient to return if eye does not feel better
b. Tell patient to apply steroids QID for 3 days and then taper to BID for balance of 7 days
c. F/U in 3 days - if worse consult with OMD
d. Consult with OMD after 7 days if iritis not resolved

c. F/U in 3 days (72hrs) - if worse consult with OMD

16

Patient presents in the office with severe pain, blurry vision, and bloodshot eyes. This has been going on now for several months off and on. His PCP prescribed sulfacetamide 10% but it has not helped.. You find not only A/C cells and mutton fat deposits on endothelium, but also vitreous haze. You suspect a granulomotous type of posterior uveitis. What do you do next
a. Prescribe steroid q1h and ask patient to return within 72 hours
b. Consult with your local friendly OMD
c. Refer to OMD immediately for treatment
d. Order a series of lab tests to determine cause of uveitis

c. Refer to OMD immediately for treatment

17

You have been treating a patient for iritis for several weeks. Patient reports some improvement, but the condition has not resolved completely and patient is still on meds. Since today is the 6wk follow up visit to your office you will have to make a decision:
a. Change steroid from topical to oral
b. Refer to an ophthalmologist
c. Discontinue the steroid
d. Consult with an ophthalmologist for suggestion on modifying treatment

b. Refer to an ophthalmologist

18

A patient calls first thing Monday morning with severe pain in left eye. She has been wearing soft contact lenses for years but not very compliant with either wearing time or proper care of lenses. You ask her to come in to the office immediately. Your worse fears are confirmed. She has a possible infectious corneal ulcer. Which of the following is appropriate:
a. Discontinue contact lens wear
b. Prescribe Ciloxan-loading dose q5minx5doses, then q30min for 6 hrs, then q1h until corneal improvement
c. Reevaluate within 48 hours and refer if no improvement
d. All are appropriate

d. All are appropriate

19

A patient comes to your office with mild pain, some redness and a small bump on the right eye. You find injection and a small nodule on the temporal aspect of the eye just under the conjunctiva. Your diagnosis is nodular episcleritis. You decide to prescribe Loteprednol. Which of the following statements is not true:
a. F/U within 3 days- if improvement is only slight consult with ophthalmologist
b. F/U within 72 hours, if condition becoming worse consult with ophthalmologist
c. If condition has not resolved within 3 weeks need to consult.
d. If patient still on meds after 6 weeks need to refer

a. F/U within 3 days- if improvement is only slight consult with ophthalmologist

20

Patient presented with an internal hordeolum 1 wk ago. You prescribed warm compresses. Now the eye is worse-very painful, red, swollen lid and discharge. The lid is hyperemic and tender to touch suggesting the presence of preseptal cellulitis. You now prescribe Augmentin (oral antibiotic) and follow up daily until improvement. If NO improvement:
a. Within 48 hrs, refer to an ophthalmologist
b. Within 72 hours, consult with an ophthalmologist
c. Change oral antibiotic and add topical antibiotic
d. Increase frequency of warm compresses

a. Within 48 hrs, refer to an ophthalmologist

21

One of your patients has had a recurring case of herpes simplex on the left eye. This is the third time. The lid shows a cluster of vesicles and the cornea a typical dendritic fluorescein pattern. You want to prescribe Zirgan and Acyclovir for the HSV blepharo-keratitis. Which of the following is correct:
a. Cannot prescribe. Since conditions are recurring need to refer immediately
b. At the 7-day visit, if cornea not improved, refer to an ophthalmologist.
c. At 3-week visit, if either condition has not resolved, refer to an ophthalmologist.
d. B, and C are correct.

d. B, and C are correct.

22

Patient reports baby scratched her eye last night. The pain is so severe that taking non- prescription Tylenol or Ibuprofen does not help much. You find a large corneal abrasion. In addition to standard treatment, you prescribe Tylenol #3 to help patient sleep better.
a. In 3 days you must consult with an ophthalmologist if pain becomes worse
b. In 3 days you must refer to an ophthalmologist if pain not resolved
c. In 7 days you must consult if no improvement
d. In 7 days you must refer if still on meds

b. In 3 days you must refer to an ophthalmologist if pain not resolved

23

Of the following eye conditions, which does
not require either referral or consultation if it
recurs within one year:
a. Episcleritis
b. Marginal keratitis
c. Preseptal cellulitis
d. Idiopathic iritis

c. Preseptal cellulitis

24

Preseptal cellulitis, adnexal infections, and dacryoadenitis that are NOT IMPROVING require a referral to an OMD when?
A. 12hrs
B. 72hrs
C. 24hrs
D. 48hrs

D. 48hrs

25

One should CONSULT an OMD if traumatic iritis is getting WORSE after how long?
A. 48hrs
B. 72hrs
C. 1wk
D. 3wks

B. 72hrs

26

One should refer to an OMD if a traumatic iritis has NOT RESOLVED within how long?
A. 48hrs
B. 72hrs
C. 1wk
D. 2wks
E. 3wks

C. 1wk

27

One should CONSULT an OMD if idiopathic iritis, episcleritis, inflammatory keratitis, or traumatic iritis is WORSE after how long?
A. 48hrs
B. 72hrs
C. 1wk
D. 3wks
E. 6wks

B. 72hrs

28

One should CONSULT an OMD when idiopathic iritis or episcleritis has NOT RESOLVED after how long?
A. 48hrs
B. 72hrs
C. 1wk
D. 3wks
E. 6wks

D. 3wks

29

One should REFER to an OMD when an idiopathic iritis or episcleritis is still on meds after how long?
A. 48hrs
B. 72hrs
C. 1wk
D. 3wks
E. 6wks

E. 6wks

30

One should REFER to an OMD when ocular or dermatological manifestations of HSV or HZV have NOT RESOLVED after how long?
A. 48hrs
B. 72hrs
C. 1wk
D. 3wks
E. 6wks

D. 3wks