Ch. 11: Perspectives on IPv4 Subnetting Flashcards Preview

CCNA 200-301 > Ch. 11: Perspectives on IPv4 Subnetting > Flashcards

Flashcards in Ch. 11: Perspectives on IPv4 Subnetting Deck (10)
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1

subnet

Subdivisions of a Class A, B, or C network, as configured by a network administrator. Subnets allow a single Class A, B, or C network to be used instead of multiple networks, and still allow for a large number of groups of IP addresses, as is required for efficient IP routing.

2

network

A collection of computers, printers, routers, switches, and other devices that can communicate with each other over some transmission medium.

3

classful IP network

An IPv4 Class A, B, or C network; called a classful network because these networks are defined by the class rules for IPv4 addressing.

4

variable-length subnet mask (VLSM)

The capability to specify a different subnet mask for the same Class A, B, or C network number on different subnets. VLSM can help optimize available address space.

5

network part

The portion of an IPv4 address that is either 1, 2, or 3 octets/bytes long, based on whether the address is in a Class A, B, or C network.

6

subnet part

In a subnetted IPv4 address, interpreted with classful addressing rules, one of three parts of the structure of an IP address, with the subnet part uniquely identifying different subnets of a classful IP network.

7

host part

A term used to describe a part of an IPv4 address that is used to uniquely identify a host inside a subnet. The host part is identified by the bits of value 0 in the subnet mask.

8

public IP network

Any IPv4 Class A, B, or C network assigned for use by one organization only, so that the addresses in the network are unique across the Internet, allowing packets to be sent through the public Internet using the addresses.

9

private IP network

Any of the IPv4 Class A, B, or C networks as defined by RFC 1918, intended for use inside a company but not used as public IP networks.

10

subnet mask

A 32-bit number that numerically describes the format of an IP address, by representing the combined network and subnet bits in the address with mask bit values of 1, and representing the host bits in the address with mask bit values of 0.