Ch 2- Achieving Psychological Health Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Ch 2- Achieving Psychological Health Deck (62):
1

Psychological Health

-how people express their emotions
-cope with stress, adversity, and success
-adapt to changers in themselves and their environment
-cognitive and social functioning

2

Biophsychological model

social, biological, and psychological factors interact and affect psychological health i.e. poor psychological health can cause physical illness

3

mental health

-ability to perceive reality
-responding to challenges
-developing strategies for living

4

Psychologically healthy people

-they are not perfect!
-Having a good self-perception and coping strategies are key

5

Some of the signs of Psychologically healthy people

-accept themselves and others
-like themselves
-appropriately express full range of human emotions
-give and receive care, love, and support
-accept life’s disappointments and their mistakes
-express sympathy and concern for others
-take care of themselves
-trust others as well as themselves
-establish goals, both short and long term
-FUNCTION INDEPENDENTLY AND INTERDEPENDENTLY
-lead a health enhancing lifestyle

6

The four basic feelings

Happy, sad, fearful, and angry

7

Feelings

Signals or guides to our health
Expressed with words or with body “talking”
Explanations are not always needed, sometimes people just know
Can undermine health or enhance well-being

8

Self-esteem

Key to psychological wellness
-They feel comfortable in social situations
-confidence
-value yourself
-pride in yourself
-self respect
-consider yourself valuable, worthy, and important
-feeling good about yourself
-self confidence and self assured
-accepting yourself
-feeling comfortable with thoughts and feelings
-gets along with others
-cope with stressful situations
-make contributions

9

People without self esteem may

-allow others to mistreat them
-not take care of themselves
-have difficulty being by themselves
-avoid taking risks
-have trouble believing people care about them
-take things personally
-overly sensitive
-perfectionist
-criticize themselves and others
-believe they can’t do anything right
-pessimistic outlook on life
-see themselves as undeserving of good fortune

10

What is self-esteem?

A sense of self worth, the valuing of oneself as a person

11

THE 6 COMPONENTS OF SELF-ESTEEME

A sense of:
-importance
-identity
-competence
-individuality
-intimacy with others
-values

12

sense of importance

sense or inner feeling that you matter and are important

13

sense of identity

who you feel you are based on demographic variables
ex: age, gender, income, relationships, religion, culture,
race, sexual orientation
some people may guess it by looking or may not be able to tell
VERY IMPORTANT

14

Sense of competence

-sense that you have control over your behavior
-sense that your behavior has an impact on then enviornment
-you can “master the environment”

15

sense of personal worth and individuality

-you are a unique, whole, and independent person
- there was not, is not, and never will be someone just like you

16

sense of intimacy with others

-a person’s ability to connect with others an have his or her needs met in relationships

17

sense of values

-philosophy of being, values, and rules for behavior
-supports the other parts of self-esteem especially the sense of identity
-make sure your behavior follows your values of you may get messed up

18

self-concept

internal picture of yourself; the way one sees oneself

19

emotional intelligence

ability to understand others; act wisely in human relations

20

5 main domains fo emotional intelligence

*KNOWING YOUR EMOTIONS (CORNERSTONE OF E.I.)
-managing your emotions
-motivating yourself
-recognizing emotions in others
-handling relationships

21

EI self awareness

-know your strengths/ weaknesses; may be generally positive, may be unstable, may hide emotions
-read your own emotions
-emotions can enhance or hijack your thoughts (ex. anxiety vs. test taking)

22

EI self management

-take action-strength/weaknesses
-can you adapt to changes/challenges
-do your words/ actions inspire trust in others

23

EI Social Awareness

-can you read emotions of others
-"read the room"
-demonstrate genuine empathy

24

EI Relationship management

-how you manage your emotions and use them
-do you give feedback, guidance, inspiration to others
-build bonds with others, foster teamwork, and network
-have a vision people see and want a part of?

25

nature vs. Nurture

nature= factors we are born with
nurture= effect of environment, people, and external factors

26

Freud

-first to study personality
-freud's terms are still used today (ego, freudian slip- unconscious thought)
-dream analysis
-studied adult women
-explored Psyche (conscious and unconscious)= the sum of all mental activity
-6 phases of psychosexual development
-believed the events of the 1st 5 years are the most important and follows us today
-sexual needs and desires are important

27

Piaget

-concerned with how we think, rather than what we think
-studied children of various ages
-identified stages of cognitive ability
-birth to adolescence
-helpful for education majors studied what kids can understand an process at each developmental stage

28

Kohlberg

-emphasized moral development
-morality develops as individual matures
-three levels of maturity

29

Kohlberg's 3 levels of maturity

pre-conventional, conventional, post conventional

30

pre-conventional

-consequences determine whether an act is right or wrong
-obey rules in order to obtain favors
-view morality as a function of power

31

conventional level

-decisions are made on the basis of whether or not they maintain social order
-act in socially approved ways
-meet others expectations

32

post-conventional level

-no absolute moral rules- they are subject to change
-define moral values in terms of freely chosen ethical principles
-not sure the right or wrong answer, question your beliefs and what is right and wrong

33

Erikson

-tracked development beyond puberty (birth to 60+ years)
-posative ego development in a a GOOD ENVIORMENT- really key
-8 stages with positive and negative aspects (18-34 years= intimacy vs. isolation)

34

Maslow

-Father of humanistic psychology
-Humanism
-developed a hearty of needs
-he studied people who had net their highest potential and found they had similar characteristics
-growth- inner needs and motivation
-people are essentially good and are capable of reaching highest potential

35

humanism

-focus=unique and positive about behavior and experiences
-person lives with purposes and values
-we have 2 types of needs
-basic needs (most urgent)
-meta needs=secondary

36

Maslow's hierachy fo needs

-basic needs at the bottom
-lower level need met first
-meta need met= completely developed human being

37

Maslow's Pyramid of needs

(bottom to top)
-Psychological needs (food, water, sleep,sex, exercise, health)
-safety and security (protection, peace order, stability)
-belonging and love (acceptance, affiliation, affection)
-esteem needs (Self-worth, self- esteem, accomplishment)
-self-actulization (spirituality ,creativity, aesthetic appreciation)

38

Carl Rogers

-viewed people as good
-believed we develop self-concept as we mature
-essental of good mental health= strong positive self concept
-developed the ideas of:
behaviorism, families of emotions, and the 5 principles of feeling
-era in which you were born may affect your personality (your life experience)
-there is a shift in traditional gender roles

39

behaviorism

-human action= determined by stimulus and response
-human action=shaped by reward and punishments
-at birth a person is a blank slate
-PERSONALITY IS LEARNED you can change it
-genetics, values= not important in personality development

40

Rogers' families of emotions

anger, sadness, fear, enjoyment, love, surprise, disgust, shame

41

Rogers' 5 principles fo feeling

-note controllable by the will
-must be recognized and accepted as they are
-every feeling, however unpleasant, has its uses
-fade in time unless they are restimulated
-can be directly influences by behavior

42

keys to psychological health

-verbal communication- listening skills
-nonverbal communications- facial expressions, eye contact, personal space, body posture

43

counciling center location

3rd floor of Lucina, they will give you tools to cope with problems

44

#1 reason students come into the counciling center

anxiety- symptoms: worry, trouble, upset stomach, fast heart, not breathing well, trouble sleeping/eating
-some people always always feel it
-OCD- worrying about a certain thing to the extent that it is unreasonable
-PTSD-result of a trauma, having fear/anxiety because of an event

45

#2 reason that students come into the counciling center

depression- symptoms: disturbance in your moos- hopelessness, crying a lot, feel bad about themselves, don't want to go out, no motivation, different sleep/eat patterns

46

#3 reason that students come into the counciling center

relationship problems

47

resources for the career counciling center

a true false test online, Sigi 3- help you find careers, help you figure out what careers you might like *only offered free on campus to students

48

crisis emergency at the counciling center

they will see you today if it is an emergency and something bad could happen if you are not seen, they will answer a call at all hours

49

other perks of the counciling center

they have doctors that come once a week that can prescribe you medicine
short term counciling
group counciling
concerned charlie
confidentiality
relaxation resource room open to everyone massage chair and light therapy(seasonal affective disorder oct-march) open 8-5- they need volunteers
10 licensed psychologist on staff that each have their own speciality

50

short term counciling

a limit of 12 sessions, the average is 5, they will refer you out if they know that you will need more than 12 sessions. they focus on what is in the way right now, the first session is an 'intake session" where they will ask you a bunch of questions to get a feel of what your needs are. GUARANTEED REFERRAL (AND HIGHEST MORTALITY RATE OF PHYCOLOGICAL DISORDERS)- ANOREXIA

51

group counciling

unlimited. once they start no one else is allowed to join so that the people in it feel comfortable the who time, a good support for students, a lot of people move to group sessions after having individualized sessions.

52

volunteers

they have students that help monitor the relaxation room and they have students that will do sessions with graduate/doctoral students (they are video taped and viewed by the licensed psychologist)

53

concerned Charlie

an anonymus place where you can ask any question and they will write back. posted publicly for anyone to read

54

confidentiality

everything is confidential if you are 18+, must have a signed release form if anyone else is to hear the information
*ACCEPTIONS- if you say you are going to kill yourself or others, child abuse is suspected, there is eminent danger

55

learned helplessness

a theory of motivation explaining how individuals can learn to feel powerless, trapped, and defeated

56

learned optimism

an attribution style regerding permanence, pervasiveness, and personalization; how people explain both positive and negative events in their lives, accounting for success and failure

57

permanence

the first dimension of learned optimism, related to whether certain events are perceived as temporary or long lastin

58

persuasiveness

the second dimension of learned optimism, related to whether events are perceived as specific or general

59

personalization

the third dimension of learned optimism, related to whether an individual takes things personally or is more balanced in accepting responsibility for positive and negative events

60

neurotransmitters

chemical messengers that transfer electrical impulses across the synapses between nerve cells. regulates meed and emotions

61

mania

excessive energy, racing thoughts, trying to do too much

62

Interpersonal process therapy

IPT a relational approach to psychotherapy that suggests problems are interpersonal in nature and family experiences have a significant impact on one's sense of self and others