CHAPTER V HUMAN RESOURCE PLANNING Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in CHAPTER V HUMAN RESOURCE PLANNING Deck (25)
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1

It may be defined as 'a strategy for the acquisition, utilisation, improvement and retention of the human resources required by the enterprise in pursuit of its objectives.'

a. Risk management
b. Human resource planning
c. Forecasting Demand
d. Forecasting Supply

B

2

he traditional 'manpower planning' model may be broadly outlined as follows. EXCEPT

A. Forecast supply
B. Forecast demand
C. Retaining
D. Remove any discrepancy

C

('manpower planning' model are
1. Forecast demand
2. Forecast supply
3. Remove any discrepancy

3

Lam and Schaubroeck (2002) argue that HR planning is critical to organisation strategy, because it is able to identify: EXCEPT

A. Improvements in productivity
B. Shortfalls in organisational capability
C. Surpluses in organisational capability
D. Poor utilisation of people

A


1. Shortfalls in organisational capability
2. Surpluses in organisational capability
3. Poor utilisation of people

4

A contingency approach to HRP. Kane and Stanton (1994) suggest three broad approaches that respond to these uncertainties. EXCEPT

A. The staff replacement approach
B. Short-term Human Resource Strategy.
C. Long-range detailed HRP
D. Vision-driven Human Resource Development.

C

(three broad approaches are:
1. The staff replacement approach
2. Short-term Human Resource Strategy
3. Vision-driven Human Resource Development

5

The three process of HRP except:

a. Forecasting Demand
b. Forecasting Supply
c. Labour turnover
d. Closing gap between demand and supply

C

(The three process of HRP are;
1. Forecasting Demand
2. Forecasting Supply
3. Closing gap between demand and supply

6

Which one of these is not the internal factors of forecasting demand.

a. Organisational objectives
b. The cost of labour
c. Staff characteristics and utilisation
d. Government policy

D.

(INTERNAL FACTORS OF FORECASTING DEMAND
1. Organisational objectives
2. Staff characteristics and utilisation
3. The cost of labour

7

Which one of these is not the external factors of forecasting demand

a. Government policy
b. Demand in the relevant labour markets.
c. Technological developments.
d. skill availability

D


(external factors of forecasting demand
1. Demand in the relevant labour markets.
2. Government policy
3. Technological developments.

8

Which one of these is not the external factors of forecasting supply

a. Skill availability
b. Competitor activity
c. Wage and salary rates
d. the cost of labour

D

(external factors of forecasting supply
1. Skill availability
2. Changes in skill availability
3. Competitor activity
4. Demographic changes
5. Wage and salary rates

9

It is the number of employees leaving an organisation and being replaced.

A. Crude labour turnover rate
B. Labour turnover
C. second induction crisis
D. 'first induction crisis

B

10

This is normally quoted as an annual rate and may be used to measure turnover per organisation, department or group of employees.

A. Crude labour turnover rate
B. Labour turnover
C. second induction crisis
D. 'first induction crisis

A

11

to eliminate short-term employees from our analysis, thus obtaining a better picture of the significant movements in the workforce.

A. Crude labour turnover rate
B. Labour stability
C. second induction crisis
D. 'first induction crisis

B

12

The employment life cycle usually shows a decision point shortly after joining, when things are still new and perhaps difficult. This is called the ____

A. Crude labour turnover rate
B. Labour stability
C. second induction crisis
D. 'first induction crisis

D

13

There is then a period of mutual accommodation and adjustment between employer and employee called the ____ period in the settling of areas of conflict, there may be further turnover.

A. Crude labour turnover rate
B. differential transit'
C. second induction crisis
D. 'first induction crisis

B

14

A _____ occurs as both parties come to terms with the new status quo.

A. Crude labour turnover rate
B. differential transit'
C. second induction crisis
D. 'first induction crisis

C

15

A systematic investigation into the causes of unusually or undesirably high turnover will have to be made, using various methods.

A. Retention planning
B. exit interviews
C. Attitude surveys
D. Statistical Methods

A

16

It must be recognised, however, that the reasons given for leaving may not be complete, true, or those that would be most useful to the organisation.

A. Retention planning
B. exit interviews
C. Attitude surveys
D. Statistical Methods

B

17

to gauge the general climate of the organisation, and the response of the workforce as a whole to working conditions, management style and so on.

A. Retention planning
B. exit interviews
C. Attitude surveys
D. Statistical Methods

C

18

It can be used to create a more accurate model of the future than simple subjective estimates.

A. Retention planning
B. exit interviews
C. Attitude surveys
D. Statistical Methods

D

19

A _____ is an investigation designed to Give a picture of the current structure, size and productivity of the organisation's labour force

A. human resource audit
B. HR records
C. Staff utilisation
D. Cost-benefit analysis

A

20

It should be checked to identify that any change (promotion, transfer, redundancy, recruitment, etc) has been properly approved, in line with the HR plan.

A. human resource audit
B. HR records
C. Staff utilisation
D. Cost-benefit analysis

B

21

This process may uncover a need for fundamental change (such as a complete restructure or automation of work).

A. human resource audit
B. HR records
C. Staff utilisation
D. Cost-benefit analysis

C

22

A ____is a comparison of the cost of an actual or proposed measure with an evaluation or estimate of the benefits gained from it. This will indicate whether the measure has been, or is likely to be, cost-effective or 'worthwhile'.


A. human resource audit
B. HR records
C. Staff utilisation
D. Cost-benefit analysis

D

23

It emphasises the____ of the plan, including wages and related costs, in relation to gains in efficiency or effectiveness.

A. cost-effectiveness
B.Staff utilisation
C. total cost
D. Cost-benefit analysis

C

24

There are a number of reasons why a cost-benefit analysis of the HR plan might be useful. EXCEPT

A. It emphasises the total cost of the plan, including wages and related costs, in relation to gains in efficiency or effectiveness.
B. It allows costs of the plan to be compared with other options.
C. It emphasises that cost-effectiveness – not cost-minimisation – is the aim.
D. Developing and multi-skilling existing staff

D

25

Typical elements of HRP might include the following. EXCEPT

A. resourcing plan
B. recruitment plan
C. training plan
D. cost-effectiveness

D

( ELEMENTS OF HRP
1. The resourcing plan
2. Internal resource plan
3. The recruitment plan
4. The training plan
5. The re-development plan
6. The flexibility plan
7. The productivity plan
8. The downsizing plan
9. The retention plan