Chapters 1-3 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Chapters 1-3 Deck (69):
1

13 roles of the Human Service Professional:

•Outreach worker •Caregiver
•Broker •Community planner
•Advocate •Data manager
•Evaluator •Administrator
•Teacher/educator •Consultant
•Behavior changer •Mobilizer
•Assistant to specialist

2

Outreach worker:

Might go into communities to work with clients.

3

Broker:

Helps clients find and use services.

4

Advocate:

Champions and defends clients causes and rights.

5

Evaluator:

Assesses client programs and shows that agencies are accountable for services provided.

6

Who is the Human Service Professional today?

A person who has an Associates or bachelors degree in human services or a closely related field.

Specific coursework varies from program to program.

7

Teacher/educator:

Tutors, mentors, and models new behaviors for clients.

8

Behavior changer:

Uses intervention strategies and counseling skills to facilitate client change.

9

Mobilizer:

Organizes client and community support to provide needed services.

10

Consultant:

Seeks and offers knowledge and support to other professionals and meets with clients and community groups to discuss and solve problems.

11

Community planner:

Designs, implements, and organizes new programs to service client needs.

12

Caregiver:

Offers direct support, encouragement, and hope to clients.

13

Data manager:

Develops systems to gather facts and statistics as a means of evaluating programs.

14

Administrator:

Supervises community service programs.

15

Assistant to specialist:

Works closely with the highly trained professional as an aide and helper in servicing clients.

16

8 characteristics of an effective Human Services Professional:

Relationship building
Empathy
Genuineness
Acceptance
Open-mindedness
Cognitive complexity
Psychological adjustment
Competence

17

Relationship building:

The ability of the client and helper to build an emotional bond and to work on setting attainable goals.

18

Empathy:

The ability to understand the inner world of another.

Deep understanding of another person's point of view.

The 2nd critical element of an effective helping relationship.

19

Genuineness:

Being in sync with one's own feelings and behaviors.

Readily showing feelings to others (transparency).

20

Acceptance:

Ability to accept the helpee unconditionally, without having strings attached to the relationship.

Having high regard for others regardless of dissimilar cultural heritage, values, or belief systems.

21

Open-Mindedness:

Nondogmatic.

Allow others to express points of view.

They have their own strong views but not a need to persuade others.

22

Cognitive complexity:

The notion that all individuals can grow and change and become more complex thinkers over time.

Learning is a mutual and reciprocal process.

23

Psychological adjustment:

Helper must have his/her own mental state in order.

24

Competence:

Consistently seeking to improve knowledge, skills and abilities.

25

Human Services Professionals Competencies:

•Participant empowerment
•Assesment
•Crisis intervention
•Organization participation
•Communication
•Community and living skills and supports
•Advocacy
•Documentation
•Community & networking
•Facilitation of services

26

List other mental health professionals:

•Psychiatrist
•Psychologist
•Social worker
•Counselor
•Couple and Family Counselors
•Psychiatric Nurse
•Psychotherapist

27

The professional association for Psychiatrists is:

The American Psychiatric Association (APA)

28

The professional association for Psychologists is:

The American Psychological Association (APA)

29

The professional association for Social Workers:

The National Association of Social Workers (NASW)

30

The professional association for Counselors:

The American Counseling Association (ACA)

31

The professional association for Couple and Family Counselors:

The American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT)

32

The professional association for Psychiatric Nurses:

The American Psychiatric Nurses Association (APNA)

33

A developmentally mature Human Services Professional will:

Know his/her own approach and learn others and adapt to be effective.

Show dedication to growth in the field, self, and in consumers.

34

Individual theoretical approach says:

Although social forces may influence us, change process should focus on how a person can change his/her condition in life.

35

Systems theoretical approach says:

Our lives are a result of social conditions such as family dynamics, poverty, crime, racism, sexism, and working with the system is significant to make any change in the person.

36

Directive approach:

Believe consumers need direction/guidance in the change process; tend to teach about and direct consumer toward healthier ways of living.

37

Nondirective approach:

Trust clients own ability to make change; attempt to provide a safe, helping environment that enables the consumer to define his/her own strategies for change.

38

Deterministic view of human nature:

Forces such as instincts and early childhood development are so strong that there is little ability for person to change.

39

Antideterministic view of human nature:

Strong belief in ability of person to change.

40

Major theoretical orientations:

•Psychodynamic
•Behavioral
•Humanistic
•Cognitive
•Brief/Solution Focused

41

Psychodynamic approach:

Drives motivate behavior, which is somewhat unconscious.
Childhood events, or perceptions of those events, in combination with our drives (e.g., instinctual sex and aggression, social, positive unconscious), greatly affect our psyche and consequently later adult development.

42

Behavioral approach:

All behavior is learned and that we are conditioned by reinforcers in our environment.

43

Humanistic approach:

•We all have choices.

•Our choices define how we come to understand the world.

•There is no objective reality.

•Humans have an actualizing tendency (growth force).

44

Cognitive approach:

•Thinking is conditioned and starts in early childhood.

•Ways of thinking are reinforced throughout life and are related to how we act and feel.

45

Brief/Solution Focused approach:

•Build the relationship and assess problem.

•Develop a plan for client, encouraging HW, assignments, and working on the problem.

•Following through on treatment plans and formulating the plan based on new information and client feedback.

•Termination: assess client's feelings of progress and future plans (referrals) and closure accomplished.

46

Psychodynamic approach implications:

•More empathy.
•Understand deviant behavior.
•Counter-transference.

47

Behavioral approach implications:

•Can explore with consumers the types of behaviors they wish to change and use approach.

•Modeling and empathy used more now before suggesting behavior changes.

48

Humanistic approach implications:

•Can facilitate a deeper understanding of consumer's unique experience and make choices to live a more fulfilled life.

•Do not have to focus on past but where the consumer wants to be to make changes.

49

Cognitive approach implications:

•Focus on how consumer learns about changing the ways in which they think.

•Replace destructive ways of thinking with new ways of thinking to positively affect ability to function in the world.

•Then adopt new behaviors and more positive feelings.

50

Brief/Solution Focused implications:

Very applicable for Human Services today because providers are seen as generalists, consumer needs to continue, and there are limits in funding/services.

51

Reinforcement means:

To increase behavior.

52

Punishment means:

To reduce behavior.

53

Positive reinforcement is to:

GIVE the consumer something they like.

(to increase behavior)

54

Negative reinforcement is to:

TAKE AWAY something the consumer does not like.

(to increase behavior)

55

Positive punishment is to:

GIVE the consumer something they do not like.


(to decrease behavior)

56

Negative punishment is to:

TAKE AWAY something the consumer likes.


(to decrease behavior)

57

The supervision should:

Examine own view of human nature, theoretical approach, and most effective way to work with consumers.

58

Most effective ways to supervise:

•Schedule in advance.
•Place topics on the agenda.
•Benefit from other's experience.
•Grow professionally.

59

Breaking Confidentiality:

•When consumer is in danger of hurting him/herself or someone else.

•If child is minor and law states parents have right to child's info.

•If consumer requests it, e.g., testimony in court.

•If bound by law, e.g., report selling drugs.

•To reveal info about your consumer to your supervisor to benefit the client.

•When you have written agreement from the consumer to reveal info of specific sources, e.g., other social services agencies collaboratively assisting consumer.

60

Dual relationship :

Professional and client relationship. These are unethical, they are discouraged.

61

What is social casework?

The process by which the needs of the client are examined and a treatment plan is designed.

62

Credentialing provides many benefits including the following:

•Increasing the status of those credentialed.

•Helping to identify the roles and functions of a profession.

•Helping to identify those individuals who are appropriately trained.

•Offering a potential avenue for complaints against professionals.

63

The three types of credentialing are:

Registration, certification, and licensure.

64

Registration:

Most basic form, individual has met minimum competence, such as having obtain a degree or having done an apprenticeship. Regulated by state-to-state.

65

Certification:

More rigorous than registration and involves the formal recognition that an individual within a professional group has met certain predetermined standards of professionalism, such as the attainment of a degree, the passing of the certification exam, and/or documentation of a minimum amount of work experience.

66

Licensure:

The most rigorous form of credentialing. Provides the scope of what an individual can do. Can obtain third-party reimbursement for providing counseling and psychotherapy to clients. Licensure requirements vary from state to state.

67

Ethical standards of Human Services Professionals:

•They protect consumers and further the professional standing of the organization.

•They are a statement about the maturity and professional identity of a profession.

•They guide professionals toward certain types of behaviors that reflect the underlying values considered to be desirable in the profession.

•They offer a framework for the sometimes difficult ethical decision-making process.

•They can be offered as one measure of defense if the professional is sued for malpractice.

68

Issues with the ethical guidelines:

•Codes don't address some issues and offer no clear way of responding to other issues.

•There are sometimes conflicts within the same code, between the code and the law, and between the code and a counselor's value system.

•It's sometimes difficult to enforce ethical violations in the codes.

•The public is often not involved in the code construction process, and public interests are not always taken into account.

•Codes don't always address "cutting-edge" issues.

69

Positive Reinforcement is to:

Give the consumer something they do like to increase behavior.