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Flashcards in Circles and Rectangles Deck (262):
1

ironic (adj.)

resulting in an unexpected and contrary outcome

It is ironic that his success came when he last wanted it.

2

irreproachable (adj.)

blameless; impeccable

Homer's conduct at the office party was irreproachable; even Marge didn't have anything bad to say about how he behaved.

3

jocular (adj.)

said or done in jest

Although Bill knew he the boss hated jokes. he couldn't resist making one jocular remark.

4

labyrinth (n.)

maze

Hiding from Indian Joe, Tom and Becky soon lost themselves in the labyrinth of secret underground caves.

5

laconic (adj.)

brief and to the point

Many of the characters portrayed by Clint Eastwood are laconic types: strong men of few words.

6

laggard (adj.)

slow; sluggish

The sailor had been taught not to be laggard in carrying out orders.

7

lament (v.)

to grieve; to express sorrow

Even advocates of the war lamented the loss of so many lives in combat.

8

lampoon (v.)

to ridicule

This article lampoons the pretensions of some movie moguls.

9

lassitude (n.)

languor (=state of tiredness); weariness

After a massage and a long soak in the hot tub, I gave in to my growing lassitude and lay down for a nap.

10

laud (v.)

to praise

The NFL lauded Boomer Esiason's efforts to raise money to combat cystic fibrosis.

11

lavish (adj.)

generous; openhanded; wasteful

Her wealthy suitors wooed her with lavish gifts.

12

lethargic (adj.)

drowsy; dull

The stuffy room made her lethargic: she felt as if she was about to nod off.

13

levity (n.)

lack of seriousness; lightness

Stop giggling and wriggling around in the pew; such levity is improper in church

14

levy (v.)

to impose (a fine); to collect (a payment)

Crying "No taxation without representation," the colonists demonstrated against England's power to levy taxes.

15

lewd (adj.)

lustful

The found his lewd stories objectionable.

16

lexicographer (n.)

compiler of a dictionary

The new dictionary is the work of many lexicographers who spent years compelling and editing the work.

17

lexicon (n.)

dictionary

I cannot find this word in any lexicon in the library.

18

listless (adj.)

lacking in spirit or energy

We had expected him to be full of enthusiasm and were surprised by his listless attitude.

19

sublime (adj.)

elevated or lofty in thought or language; impressing the mind with a grandeur of power

20

pernicious (adj.)

causing insidious harm or ruin

21

plight (n.)

a dangerous, difficult, or unfortunate situation

22

prospectus (n.)

a printed document that advertises or describes a school, commercial enterprise, a forthcoming book, etc.

23

tenet (n.)

a principle or belief, especially one of a religious philosophy

24

pluralistic (n.)

theory that reality consists of two or more independent elements

25

baneful (adj.)

destructive; pernicious

26

indispensable (adj.)

absolutely necessary; essential

27

supercilious (adj.)

haughtily disdainful and contemptuous

28

sagacious (adj.)

shrewd

29

penitent (adj.)

feeling or expressing sorrow for wrongdoing

30

perspicacious (adj.)

having keen mental perception and understanding

31

apologetic (adj.)

containing an apology or excuse for a fault; defending speech or writing

32

potentate (n.)

a person who possesses great power, such as a monarch or ruler

33

ascetic (n.)

a person who practices self-denial

34

maverick (n.)

an unorthodox or independent-minded person

35

prosaic (adj.)

commonplace; unromantic

36

regimented (adj.)

very strictly organized

37

jaded (adj.)

tired, bored, lacking in enthusiasm

38

stymie (v.)

prevent of hinder the progress of

39

sierra (n.)

long, jagged mountain chain

40

archipelago (n.)

group of islands

41

flotilla (n.)

fleet of boats or ships

42

folly (n.)

lack of good sense; foolishness

43

obsequious (adj.)

obedient or attentive to an excessive or servile degree

44

bombast (n.)

high-sounding language with little meaning, usually to impress people

45

subterfuge (n.)

deceit used in order to achieve one's goal

46

panache (n.)

flamboyant confidence or style or manner

47

dislodge (v.)

to kick out of position

48

apportion (v.)

to divide and allocate

49

usurp (v.)

to take illegally by force

50

expropriate (v.)

to take away from its owner

51

reparation (n.)

the making of amends for a wrong

52

insinuate (v.)

to suggest or hint slyly; to instill or infuse subtly or artfully

53

conviction (n.)

a fixed or firm belief

54

decrepit (adj.)

weakened by old age; feeble; infirm

55

underscore (v.)

to emphasize

56

stint (v.)

to be frugal

57

eminent (adj.)

high in position

58

emblem (n.)

an object symbolizing a quality, state, or class

59

defunct (adj.)

no longer in effect or use

60

prodigious (adj.)

extraordinary in size, degree, or extent

61

petulant (adj.)

childishly sulky or bad-tempered

62

vindictive (adj.)

vengeful

63

amnesia (n.)

partial or total loss of memory

64

penchant (n.)

strong inclination or taste

65

miser (n.)

a person who hoards wealth and spends as little money as possible

66

ingenue (n.)

an innocent or unsophisticated young woman

67

quiescent (adj.)

in a state or period of inactivity or dormancy

68

surreptitious (adj.)

kept secret, especially because it would not be approved of

69

transnational (adj.)

extending or operating across national boundaries

70

mendacious (adj.)

lying

71

cosmopolitan (adj.)

familiar and at ease in many different countries or cultures

72

singularly (adverb.)

in an remarkable or noticeable way

73

inapt (adj.)

not suitable or appropriate in the circumstances

74

recount (v.)

to tell someone about something; to give an account of an event or experience

75

scrupulous (adj.)

conscientious (=wishing to do what's right); extremely thorough

76

scrutinize (v.)

to examine closely and critically

77

seclusion (n.)

isolation; solitude

78

sedentary (adj.)

requiring sitting

79

sage (n.)

a person celebrated for wisdom

80

sanction (v.)

to approve; to ratify

81

satirical (adj.)

mocking

82

sature (v.)

to soak thoroughly

83

savory (adj.)

tasty

84

scanty (adj.)

meager; insufficient

85

buttress (v.)

to suppoty; to prop up

86

cacophonous (adj.)

discordant; inharmonious

87

calculated (adj.)

deliberately planned; likely

88

bequeath (v.)

to leave someone by a will; to hand down

89

bleak (adj.)

cold or cheerless; unlikely to be favorable

90

blighted (adj.)

suffering from a disease; destroyed

91

braggart (n.)

boaster

92

beguile (v.)

to mislead or delude; to pass time

93

belie (v.)

to contradict; to give a false impression

94

avarice (n.)

greediness for wealth

95

aversion (n.)

firm dislike

96

assiduous (adj.)

diligent

97

assuage (v.)

to ease or lessen (pain); to satisfy (hunger); to soothe (anger)

98

atrophy (v.)

to waste away

99

attribute (v.)

to ascribe; to explain

100

augment (v.)

to increase; to add to

101

austere (adj.)

forbiddingly stern; severely simple and unornamented

102

arable (adj.)

fit for growing crops

103

arbitrary (adj.)

capricious (=given to sudden and unaccountable changes of mood or behavior); randomly chose; tyrannical (=exercising power in a cruel or arbitrary way)

104

whimsical (adj.)

playfully quaint (=attractively unusual or old-fashioned) or fanciful, especially in an appealing and amusing way; acting or behaving in a capricious manner

105

capricious (adj.)

given to sudden and unaccountable changes of mood or behavior

106

archaic (adj.)

antiquated

107

antediluvian (adj.)

antiquated; extremely ancient

108

anomaly (n.)

irregularity

109

antagonism (n.)

hostility; active resistance

110

antipathy (n.)

aversion; dislike

111

aloof (adj.)

apart; reserved

112

amorphous (adj.)

formless; lacking shape or definition

113

anachronistic (adj.)

having an error involving time in a story

114

analogous (adj.)

comparable

115

enmity (n.)

the state or feeling of being actively opposed or hostile to someone or something

116

acrid (adj.)

sharp; bitterly pungent

117

acquiesce (v.)

to assent; to agree without protesting

118

adversary (n.)

opponent

119

affable (adj.)

easily approachable

120

aggregate (v.)

to gather; to accumulate

121

volatile (adj.)

changeable; explosive; evaporating rapidly

122

voluble (adj.)

fluent; glib; talkative

123

vouchsafe (v.)

to grant; to choose to give in reply; to permit

124

virtuoso (n.)

highly skilled artist

125

virulent (adj.)

extremely poisonous; hostile bitter

126

vindicate (v.)

to clear from blame; to exonerate; to justify or support

127

vilify (v.)

to slander

128

venerate (v.)

to revere

129

viable (adj.)

practical or workable; capable of maintaining life

130

truncate (v.)

to cut the top off

131

turbulence (n.)

state of violent agitation

132

turmoil (n.)

great commotion and confusion

133

unkempt (adj.)

disheveled (=untidy or disordered (in appearance)); uncared for in appearance

134

unprecedented (adj.)

novel; unparalleled

135

usurp (v.)

to seize another's power or rank

136

unwarranted (adj.)

unjustified; groundless; undeserved

137

vacillate (v.)

to waver; to fluctuate

138

tentative (adj.)

hesitant

139

taciturn (adj.)

habitually silent; talking little

140

tantamount (adj.)

equivalent in effect or value

141

tenacity (n.)

firmness; persistence

142

temper (v.)

to moderate; to tone down or restrain; to toughen (steel)

143

surreptitious (adj.)

secret; furtive; sneaky; hidden

144

sycophant (n)

servile flatterer; bootlicker; yes man

145

surfeit (v.)

to satiate; to stuff; to indulge to excess in anyting

146

supplant (v.)

to replace; usurp

147

stolid (adj.)

unruffled; impassive; dull

148

strident (adj.)

loud and harsh; insistent

149

steadfast (adj.)

loyal; unswerving

150

stupefy (v.)

to make numb; to stun; to amaze

151

sublime (adj.)

exalted or noble and uplifting; utter

152

suavity (n.)

urbanity; polish

153

subside (v.)

to settle down; to descend; to grow quiet

154

succinct (adj.)

brief; terse; compact

155

sporadic (adj.)

occuring irregularly

156

spurious (adj.)

false; counterfeit; forged; illogical

157

spurn (v.)

to reject to scorn

158

soporific (adj.)

sleep-causing; marked by sleepiness

159

torpor (n.)

lethargy; sluggishness; dormancy

160

tirade (n.)

extended scolding; denunciation; harangue

161

transient (adj.)

momentary; temporary; staying for a short time

162

trepidation (n.)

fear; nervous apprehension

163

trifling (adj.)

trivial; unimportant

164

trite (adj.)

hackneyed; commonplace

165

hackneyed (adj.)

trite; commonplace

166

witticism (n.)

witty saying; wisecrack

167

abate (v.)

to subside; to decrease; to lessen

168

atrophy (v.)

to waste away

169

corrugated (adj.)

wrinkled; ridged

170

diffidence (n.)

modesty or shyness resulting from lack of confidence

171

desiccate (v.)

to dry up

172

deleterious (adj.)

causing damage or harm

173

culpable (adj.)

deserving blame

174

discourse (n.)

formal discussion; conversation

175

effervesce (n.)

inner excitement or exuberance; bubbling from fermentation or carbonation

176

elegy (n.)

poem or song expressing lamentatino

177

elicit (v.)

to draw out by discussion

178

ebullient (adj.)

showing excitement; overflowing with enthusiasm

179

emaciated (adj.)

abnormally thin or weak, esp. because of illness or a lack of food

180

elucidate (v.)

to explain; to enlighten

181

efface (v.)

to rub out

182

emend (v.)

to correct; to correct by a critic

183

equanimity (n.)

calmness of temperament; composure

184

equitable (adj.)

fair impartial

185

evanescent (adj.)

fleeting; vanishing

186

fallow (adj.)

plowed but not sowed (=to plant with seed); uncultivated

187

falter (v.)

to start to lose strength or momentum

188

fitful (adj.)

active or occurring spasmodically or intermittently; not regular or steady

189

florid (adj.)

ruddy; reddish; flowery

190

iconoclastic (adj.)

attacking cherished traditions

191

ignominy (n.)

deep disgrace; shame or dishonor

192

illicit (adj.)

illegal

193

impecunious (adj.)

without money

194

impregnable (adj.)

invulnerable

195

incontrovertible (adj.)

indisputable; not open to question

196

indefatigable (adj.)

tireless

197

ineffable (adj.)

unutterable; cannot be expressed in speech

198

indolent (adj.)

lazy

199

inexorable (adj.)

relentless; unyielding; implacable

200

insolvent (adj.)

bankrupt; unable to repay one's debts

201

insuperable (adj.)

insurmountable; unbeatable

202

intractable (adj.)

unruly; stubborn; unyielding

203

irreproachable (adj.)

blameless; impeccable

204

lithe (adj.)

flexible; supple

205

lurid (adj.)

wild; sensational; graphic; gruesome

206

luxuriant (adj.)

abundant; rich and splendid; fertile

207

mercenary (adj.)

interested in money or gain

208

mercurial (adj.)

capricious; changing; fickle

209

mirth (n.)

merriment; laughter

210

misanthrope (n.)

one who hates mankind

211

misnomer (n.)

wrong name; incorrect designation

212

mollify (v.)

to soothe

213

mosaic (n.)

picture made of colorful small inlaid tiles

214

munificent (adj.)

very liberal in giving or bestowing

215

nefarious (adj.)

wicked or criminal

216

odious (adj.)

hateful; vile

217

pariah (n.)

social outcast

218

parsimony (n.)

stinginess; excessive frugality

219

paucity (n.)

scarcity

220

penury (n.)

severe poverty; stinginess

221

perfunctory (adj.)

superficial; not thorough; lacking interest, care, or enthusiasm

222

pernicious (adj.)

very destructive

223

pithy (adj.)

concise; meaningful; substantial; meaty

224

polemical (adj.)

aggressive in verbal attack; disputatious

225

pitfall (n.)

hidden danger; concealed trap

226

prattle (v.)

to babble

227

precarious (adj.)

uncertain; risky

228

profligate (adj.)

dissipated; wasteful; wildly immoral

229

quagmire (n.)

soft, wet, boggy land; complex or dangerous situation from which it is difficult to free oneself

230

quell (v.)

to extinguish; to put down; to quiet

231

querulous (adj.)

fretful; whining

232

rant desiccate

to rave; to talk excitedly; to scold; to make a grandiloquent speech

233

rarefy (v.)

to make rarer; to make less dense; to make more refined or spiritual

234

raucous (adj.)

harsh and shrill; disorderly and boisterous

235

raze (v.)

to destroy completely

236

recant (v.)

to withdraw or retract (a claim)

237

remission (n.)

temporary moderation of disease symptoms

238

replete (adj.)

filled to the brim or to the point of being stuffed abundantly supplied

239

repugnant (adj.)

loathsome; hateful

240

rescind (v.)

to cancel (n.)

241

respite (n.)

interval or relief; time for rest; delay in punishment

242

resplendent (adj.)

dazzling; glorious; brilliant

243

swagger (n.)

a very confident and often arrogant manner

244

threadbare (adj.)

becoming thin and tattered with age; poor and shabby in appearance

245

carping (adj.)

finding fault

246

certitude (n.)

certainty

247

circumlocution (n.)

indirect or roundabout expression

248

coalesce (v.)

to combine; to fuse

249

confluence (n.)

flowing together; crowd

250

conjecture (n.)

an opinion or conclusion formed on the basis of incomplete information

251

edify (v.)

to instruct; to correct morally

252

quandary (n.)

dilemma

253

ravenous (adj.)

extremely hungry

254

partisan (adj.)

one-sided; prejudice; committed to a party

255

deference (n.)

courteous regard for another's wish

256

depose (v.)

to dethrone; remove from office

257

depravity (n.)

extreme corruption; wickedness

258

foolhardy (adj.)

rash

259

incidental (adj.)

not essential; minor

260

distend (v.)

to expand; to swell out

261

dilatory (adj.)

delaying

262

meander (v.)

to wind or turn in its course