Control of ectoparasites 2 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Control of ectoparasites 2 Deck (46)
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1

What does the abbreviation NFA-VPA mean?

non food producing animals, vet, pharmacist, SQP

2

Give examples of drugs that are distributed systemically and redistributed to the skin

-Selamectin/ moxidectin (topical)
-Lufenuron (oral)

3

What drugs can you use to kill the flea pupa?

NONE, you have to let them hatch (can take 3 months) and then kill them as adults

4

What does IGR stand for?

Insect growth regulators

5

Give examples of IGRs used in flea control

- Juvenile hormone analogue (S-methoprene or pyriproxyfen): in frontlone combo and some environmental sprays
- Chitin synthesis inhibitors (lufenuron)

6

Discuss the use of natural botanical products in flea treatments

-e.g. citronella, cedarwood, lemongrass
-Often exact conc of active ingredient isn't known which can be dangerous

7

Name of chewing and one sucking louse

Chewing: Trichodectes
Sucking: Linognathus

8

Why could the treatment of lice infestations be thought easier than that of fleas?

-Because lice spend their whole life cycle on the host so you don't need to consider the environment the same way you do in flea infestations.

9

What does an effective treatment of lice infestations involve?

-Treatment of infected animal and animals in contact with it
-Clean the environment as often linked to animals in poor health/ unsanitary conditions

10

Give examples of drugs used to treat lice

-topical OGs (pour ons/ spray)
-Pyrethroids
-Topical avermectins
-Amitraz (cattle/ pigs)
-Imidacloprid (dogs/cats)

11

Give an examples treatment plan for keds

-Topical OPs, 3 applications 2 weeks apart.

12

What drugs can be used to treat flies?

-Topical insecticides e.g. pyrethroids/ topical OPs

13

How big are mites?

less than 0.5mm

14

How big are ticks?

2-20mm

15

What are the direct/ indirect effect of ticks?

-Direct:
Blood loss
Skin damage
Secondary skin infections
-Indirect:
Vector to diseases

16

What protozoal infections can ticks carry?

-Babesiosis

17

What bacterial infections can ticks carry?

Ehrlichiosis
Borreliosis (lyme)

18

What viral diseases can ticks carry?

Louping ill

19

What is the significance of the different tick lifecycles on treatments?

- Hard (ixodid) ticks are NON NIDOCULOUS
-this makes them harder to control as they have multiple hosts compared to
-Soft (argasid) ticks are easier

20

What are the common tick species found in the UK?

-Ixodes ricinus (vector to most things)
-Ixodes hexagonous (B.burgdorferi)
-Ixodes canisuga (B.burgdorferi)

21

Which tick, found mainly in western Europe, is a vector for Babesia canis?

- Dermacentor reticulatus

22

What is the pathogen responsible for causing Lyme disease?

-Borrelia bugdorferi

23

Describe Babesiosis

-Infects erythrocytes
-Protozoan parasite
-Results in destruction of erythrocytes causing severe anaemia

24

What causes babesiosis in the UK?

AKA redwater fever not tick fever
-B divergens
(tick/ cattle fever is caused by B bovis)

25

What are the clinical signs for canine babesiosis?

-Fever
-weight loss
-Lethargy
-Jaundice
-Splenomegaly
-Haemolytic anaemia

26

What are the strategies of tick control?

- Avoid tick habitats in late spring/ summer
- Destruction of tick habitats/ spraying pesticides in environment
- Regular inspections of pets and quick removal or ticks

27

Name a drug used to treat tick infestation in cattle/ sheep

-Pyrethroids

28

In terms of the tick eradication programme in Texas. What are the 2 options when fever ticks are found on cattle?

- Leave cattle on infested pasture. Scratch/ dip them every 14 days for 9 consecutive month

-Pasture vacated of all livestock for 6-0 months (deer often move in so have to put ivermectin out for the deer)

29

What are the direct/ indirect effects of mites?

-Direct:
Skin lesions (mange)
Loss of blood
Zoonotic
-Indirect:
Secondary bacterial infections
Transmit pathogens

30

What are the effects of mange?

-Lichenification
- Erythema
-Pruritus
-Scale
- Alopecia

31

What drugs are licensed for treatment of sarcoptes in dogs?

-Moxidectin
-Amitraz
-Selamectin

32

What causes Psoroptic mange?

P. ovis

33

What causes Psoroptic mange?

P. ovis

34

If your cat has tapeworms and your dog eats the shed prolottids what will happen?

Nothing

35

Why are tapeworm infections difficult to stop reinfection?

Because they have a short pre patent period. And fleas are often quite persistant.

36

Are macrocyclic lactones an effective form of treatment against tapeworms?

No

37

In which region of a dogs body does Diplydium caninum mature?

In the small intestine

38

Is diplydium caninum zoonotic?

Yes

39

What is the infective stage of the heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) lifecycle?

Microfilariae

40

What is the best diagnosis test for Dirofilaria immitis?

ELISA (detect Ag of the worm)

41

What is the general treatment plan for a dog with heartworm?

-Kill all adult worms with an adulticide, then kill all circulating microfilariae.
-Animal should have restircted access for 4-6 weeks after adulticide because of stress on the heart and lungs of dead worms.
-Dogs with vena cava syndrome require surgical removal of adult worms

42

Which 2 genus of Taenia cause human disease? Which is a greater risk to humans?

T. saginata
T.solium
-T solium has potential to develop multiple cysticerci in vital organs

43

How do you distinguish between saginata and solium?

The number of uterine branches
-Solium= <14
-Saginata= >14

44

What is the normal diagnosis method for H. contortus?

Faecel exam for eggs

45

How do you treat H. contortus infections?

Ivermectin or fenbendazole

46

What piece of apparatus is used for diagnosing lungworms?

Baermann apparatus