Erysipelas Flashcards Preview

B - Dermatology > Erysipelas > Flashcards

Flashcards in Erysipelas Deck (16):
1

What is erysipelas?

A form of cellulitis involving the dermis and upper subcutaneous tissues

2

What is the usual cause of erysipelas?

Group A streptococcus on scratches or otherwise infected areas

3

What are some less common causative organisms of erysipelas?

- Strep pneumoniae
- Klebsiella pneumoniae
- Haemophilus influenzae
- Yersina enterocolitica
- Moraxella

4

What are the risk factors for erysipelas?

- Elderly, infants and children
- Immunodeficiency
- Diabetes
- Alcoholism
- Skin ulceration
- Fungal infections
- Impaired lymphatic drainage

5

What areas are most commonly affected in erysipelas?

- Face and legs (most common)
- Arm and upper thighs

6

What systemic symptoms can often precede skin lesion in erysipelas?

- Malaise
- Chills
- High fever
- Potentially vomiting

7

How quickly can erysipelas progress?

Within 48 hours

8

What lesion symptoms are often present in erysipelas?

- Pruritus
- Burning
- Tenderness

9

How does the lesion in erysipelas progress?

Begins as a small erythematous patch which then becomes a fiery red, indurated, tense and shiny plaque

10

How do the margins of erysipelas appear?

Sharply demarcated and advancing with rapid enlargement over 3-6 days

11

What sort of lesions can severe erysipelas produce?

- Vesicles
- Bullae
- Petechiae
- Frank necrosis

12

When does the central erythema start to clear in erysipelas?

Within 7-10 days

13

How is erysipelas investigated?

Same as cellulitis

14

What are the differentials for erysipelas?

- Herpes zoster
- Angioedema
- Contact dermatitis
- Diffuse inflammatory carcinoma of the breast
- Cellulitis

15

How is erysipelas managed?

Same as cellulitis

16

What are the potentials complications of erysipelas?

- Sepsis
- Septic arthritis
- Recurrence
- Lymphatic damage
- Necrotising fasciitis
- Permanent pigmentary changes