Identifications Flashcards Preview

Poetry > Identifications > Flashcards

Flashcards in Identifications Deck (85)
Loading flashcards...
1

My mother groaned, my father wept,
Into the dangerous world I leapt;

“Infant Sorrow”, William Blake

2

Struggling in my father's hands,
Striving against my swaddling bands,

“Infant Sorrow”, William Blake

3

Bound and weary, I thought best
To sulk upon my mother's breast.

“Infant Sorrow”, William Blake

4

The children go forward with their little satchels.

And all morning the mothers have labored

to gather the late apples, red and gold,

like words of another language.

“The School Children”, Louise Glück

5

And on the other shore

are those who wait behind great desks

to receive these offerings.

“The School Children”, Louise Glück

6

How orderly they are — the nails

on which the children hang

their overcoats of blue or yellow wool.

“The School Children”, Louise Glück

7

He has his lusty Spring, when fancy clear
Takes in all beauty with an easy span:

“The Human Seasons”, John Keats

8

And the teachers shall instruct them in silence

and the mothers shall scour the orchards for a way out,

drawing to themselves the gray limbs of the fruit trees

bearing so little ammunition.

“The School Children”, Louise Glück

9

They’re waiting to be murdered,
Or evicted. Soon
They expect to have nothing to eat.
In the meantime, they sit.

“Old Couple”, Charles Simic

10

A violent pain is coming, they think.
It will start in the heart
And climb into the mouth.
They’ll be carried off in stretchers, howling.

“Old Couple”, Charles Simic

11

Tonight they watch the window
Without exchanging a word.
It has rained, and now it looks
Like it’s going to snow a little.

“Old Couple”, Charles Simic

12

Helpless, naked, piping loud,
Like a fiend hid in a cloud.

“Infant Sorrow”, William Blake

13

I see him get up to lower the shades.
If their window stays dark,
I know his hand has reached hers
Just as she was about to turn on the lights.

“Old Couple”, Charles Simic

14

Four Seasons fill the measure of the year;
There are four seasons in the mind of man:

“The Human Seasons”, John Keats

15

He has his Winter too of pale misfeature,
Or else he would forego his mortal nature.

“The Human Seasons”, John Keats

16

He has his Summer, when luxuriously
Spring's honied cud of youthful thought he loves
To ruminate, and by such dreaming high
Is nearest unto heaven: quiet coves

“The Human Seasons”, John Keats

17

Lurk late. We
Strike straight. We

“We Real Cool”, Gwendolyn Brooks

18

Left school. We

“We Real Cool”, Gwendolyn Brooks

19

Sing sin. We
Thin gin. We

“We Real Cool”, Gwendolyn Brooks

20

Jazz June. We
Die soon.

“We Real Cool”, Gwendolyn Brooks

21

Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore,
So do our minutes hasten to their end;
Each changing place with that which goes before,
In sequent toil all forwards do contend.

“Sonnet 60”, William Shakespeare

22

Nativity, once in the main of light,
Crawls to maturity, wherewith being crown'd,
Crooked eclipses 'gainst his glory fight,
And Time that gave doth now his gift confound.

“Sonnet 60”, William Shakespeare

23

Time doth transfix the flourish set on youth
And delves the parallels in beauty's brow,
Feeds on the rarities of nature's truth,
And nothing stands but for his scythe to mow:

“Sonnet 60”, William Shakespeare

24

And yet to times in hope my verse shall stand,
Praising thy worth, despite his cruel hand.

“Sonnet 60”, William Shakespeare

25

No motion has she now, no force;
She neither hears nor sees;
Roll'd round in earth's diurnal course
With rocks, and stones, and trees.

“A Slumber Did My spirit Seal”, William Wordsworth

26

Busy old fool, unruly sun,
Why dost thou thus,
Through windows, and through curtains call on us?
Must to thy motions lovers' seasons run?

“The Sun Rising”, John Donne

27

Glory be to God for dappled things –
For skies of couple-colour as a brinded cow;
For rose-moles all in stipple upon trout that swim;

“Pied Beauty”, Gerard Manley Hopkins

28

Fresh-firecoal chestnut-falls; finches’ wings;
Landscape plotted and pieced – fold, fallow, and plough;
And áll trádes, their gear and tackle and trim.

“Pied Beauty”, Gerard Manley Hopkins

29

All things counter, original, spare, strange;
Whatever is fickle, freckled (who knows how?)
With swift, slow; sweet, sour; adazzle, dim;

“Pied Beauty”, Gerard Manley Hopkins

30

He fathers-forth whose beauty is past change:
Praise him.

“Pied Beauty”, Gerard Manley Hopkins