Intravenous Therapy Flashcards Preview

Adult 1 Exam 1 > Intravenous Therapy > Flashcards

Flashcards in Intravenous Therapy Deck (48):
1

intake and output is defined as

the measurement and recording of all fluid intake and output during a 24 – hour period

2

want intake and output to be

equal

3

intake can be

IV fluids, IV piggybacks, IV flushes, tube feeding and anything you put in it

4

output can be

urine collection, how much, and how was it collected bathroom or catheter, also vomiting

5

things to remember about intake

Oral fluids, Ice chips, Foods that are tend to become liquid at room temperature, Tube feedings. Parenteral fluids, Intravenous medications Catheter or tube irrigants

6

things to remember about output

Urine, Vomitus and liquid feces, Tube drainage, Wound drainage and draining fistulas

7

1 tablespoon (tbsp) =

15 milliliters(ml)

8

3 teaspoons(tsp) =

15 milliliters(ml)

9

1 cup(C) =

240 milliliters(ml)

10

8 ounces(oz) =

240 milliliters(ml)

11

1 teaspoon(tsp) =

5 milliliters(ml)

12

1 cup(C) =

8 ounces(oz)

13

16 ounces(oz) =

1 pound(lb)

14

1 ounce (oz) =

30milliliters(ml)

15

Gelatin (Jell-O) =

120 ml

16

Ice Cream Sherbet =

120 ml

17

4 oz. of juice =

120ml

18

1 cup of ice =

120ml (melted)

19

16 oz milkshake =

480ml

20

1 whole popsicle =

90ml

21

12 oz soda =

360ml

22

Pudding or yogurt =

120 ml

23

Significance of Measuring Intake and Output

Inform, Required, Explain, Emphasize

24

Identify whether your patient has

undergone surgery or if he has a medical condition or takes medication that can affect fluid intake or loss.

25

Measure and record all

intake and output. If you delegate this task, make sure you know the totals and the fluid sources.

26

At least every 8 hours, record the

type and amount of all fluids he's received and describe the route as oral, parenteral, rectal, or by enteric tube.

27

Record ice chips as

fluid at approximately half their volume.

28

Record the type and amount of all

fluids the patient has lost and the route.

29

Describe fluids lost by patient

as urine, liquid stool, vomitus, tube drainage and any fluid aspirated from a body cavity

30

If irrigating a nasogastric or another tube or the bladder, measure

the amount instilled and subtract it from total output.

31

For an accurate measurement, keep

toilet paper out of your patient's urine.

32

Measure drainage in a

calibrated container. Observe it eye level and take the reading at the bottom of the meniscus.

33

Evaluate patterns and values outside

the normal range, keeping in mind the typical 24 – hour intake and output.

34

When looking at 8 – hour urine output, ask

how many times the patient voided, to identify problems

35

Regard intake and output holistically because

age, diagnosis, medical problem, and type of surgical procedure can affect the amounts.

36

Evaluate trends over

24 to 48 hours.

37

Don't delegate the task of recording intake and output until you're sure

the person who's going to do it understands its importance.

38

Don't assess output by amount only. Consider

color, color changes, and odor too.

39

Don't use the same graduated container for

more than one patient.

40

Types of IV Fluids

9NSS , 45NSS, LR, D5W, D5.45 Additives... Examples are: Potassium, CA+, Magnesium, MVI, Medications (normal saline/ half normal saline - amount of Na and Chloride; yellow multivitiam - banana bag

41

. 9NSS

308 Isotonic

42

.45NSS (1/2 NSS)

154 Hypotonic

43

5% Dextrose in water (D5 W)

272 Isotonic

44

10% Dextrose in water (D10W)

500 Hypertonic

45

D5. 45NSS

406 Hypertonic

46

D5. 9NSS

560 Hypertonic

47

D5LR

525 Hypertonic

48

Ringer’s Lactate (LR)

273 Isotonic