Lecture 2-arguing ethics Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Lecture 2-arguing ethics Deck (14):
1

Define "argument"

Group of statements (premises) which are claimed to provide support for or reasons to believe another statement (conclusion)
Not just yelling at each other
attempt to convince and persuade the other party
evaluating arguments is evaluating positions using critical thinking

2

Slippery slope
-problem?

the action does not inevitably lead to the conclusion

3

Slippery slope
-example?

"If Dr. Brantly is treated for ebola in Atlanta, then Emory University will be obligated to treat all ebola patients, and local patients would lose access to healthcare"

4

Ad hominem
-problem?

-Attacking the person rather than the reasoning
-the argument may have merit even if the person making it does not

5

Ad hominem
-example?

"The main proponent of bringing Dr. Brantly to Emory is Mr. X who has a terrible reputation as a cheater at tiddlywinks. We should ignore Mr. X's argument"

6

Straw man
-problem?

-Misrepresenting the opposing argument
-Attacking the weakest point of the argument

7

Straw man
-Example?

"Dr. X claims we should bring over every ebola patient and treat them all in Atlanta. Obviously Emory does not have space for that"

8

False dilemma
-problem?

-There are almost always more than 2 options
-Usually the options are presented as extremes

9

False dilemma
-example?

"Either we refuse to allow Dr. Brantly to return, or we allow the U.S. to fall victim to the worst outbreak of ebola this world has ever seen"

10

"rules for debate"

-Represent the opposing position accurately and fairly
-identify the core issues at stake
-admit doubts, difficulties, and weaknesses in your position
-incorporate your patient's perspective

11

Know why the "rules for debate" are important
-represent the opposing position accurately and fairly

understand what their side is
don't assume they are wrong because you disagree

12

Know why the "rules for debate" are important
-identify the core issues at stake

don't argue the details (at least not at first)

13

Know why the "rules for debate" are important
-admit doubts, difficulties, and weaknesses in your position

admit them openly and honestly

14

Know why the "rules for debate" are important
-Incorporate your patient's perspective

Put yourself in the patients shoes
"I have helped patients in this situation before and this is how we worked through it"