Lecture 3 - Cells and Tissues of the Immune System 2 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Lecture 3 - Cells and Tissues of the Immune System 2 Deck (17):
1

Four paradigms of the immune system

1) Immune recognition
2) Immune effector function
3) Immune regulation
4) Immune memory

2

Is there more eukaryotic or prokaryotic DNA in a human body?

Prokaryotic

3

Is inside the mouth inside the body?

No

4

Definition of 'inside the body'

When the epithelial barrier has been surpassed

5

Why is a foetus of interest to immunologists?

Despite the foetus having a different genetic code to the mother, the foetus is not attacked by the immune system in implantation and growth

6

Method of improving IVF outcomes

Injure epithelium of womb
Inflammation might be important for pregnancy

7

Cardinal signs of inflammation
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)

1) Dolor
2) Calor
3) Rubor
4) Tumor
5) Function laesia

8

What is cognate interaction?

Interaction between antigen-presenting cell and naive T cell bearing receptor for presented antigen

9

Structure of naive T cell Vs activated T cell

Naive T cell is mostly nucleus
Activated T cell has more cytoplasm, denser nucleus

10

Immunopathology

Damage to body from immune response

11

Example of immunopathology

Hepatitis
Hepatitis doesn't damage host hepatocytes
CD8+ response to hepatitis infection is what causes damage

12

Innate immune effector mechanisms
1)
2)
3)

1) Phagocytosis
2) Microbicidal agents
3) Complement

13

How are the innate and adaptive immune systems bridged?

1) Dendritic cell phagocytoses antigen
2) Travels to local lymph node
3) Presents to naive T cells

14

Antibody functions
1)
2)
3)

1) Neutralisation of toxins
2) Opsonisation
3) Complement activation

15

Stages of T cell immune response
1)
2)
3)

1) Expansion
2) Contraction
3) Memory

16

What occurs during T cell contraction?

Dying off of clonally-expanded T cells

17

What is opsonisation?

Marking of objects for phagocytosis