Lecture 3- Interprofessional team working Flashcards Preview

Stroke week > Lecture 3- Interprofessional team working > Flashcards

Flashcards in Lecture 3- Interprofessional team working Deck (45)
Loading flashcards...
1

The members of the interprofessional Stroke team include

·  Stroke physicians

·  Stroke nurses

·  Healthcare assistants

·  Therapists: Physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech and language therapists, therapy assistants

·  Clinical psychologists

·  Social workers

·  Dietitians

·  Stroke co-ordinators

·  Pharmacists

2

role of OT 

OT is concerned with promoting health and wellbeing through occupation. The primary goal of occupational therapy is to enable people to participate in the activities of everyday life. OT’s help people maximize their independence with an emphasis on useful or functional activities.

  • OT’s class an occupation as any activity that person wishes or needs to complete.

3

OT in stroke

 

  •  

  • Stroke affects patients’ memory and thinking, physical ability, vision, mood, sensation, personality, energy levels, and continence which all impact on patient’s ability to perform their usual roles.
  • Occupational therapy in stroke survivors therefore involves assessment and intervention in a number of areas including
    • Cognition
    • Vision
    • upper limb function
    • transfers
    • activities of daily living (ADL’s),
    • and seating

4

OT assessments in stroke 

5

OT treatment/interventions

6

role of physiotherapists

  • Physiotherapists restore movement and function when someone is affected by injury, illness, or disability.
  • They help to manage pain, and to prevent disease, and disability.
  • They encourage development and facilitation of recovery, enabling people to remain independent for as long as possible

7

physiotherapists and stroke

Physiotherapy after stroke aims to help people relearn lost abilities, regain independence, reduce the risk of post stroke complications, and help prevent further strokes. There is a strong evidence base for its effectiveness.

Physiotherapy uses a number of techniques including:

  • movement and exercise
  • manual therapy
  • education
  • advice
  • specialist equipment
  • hydrotherapy.

8

9

RCP guidelines for stroke care

10

stroke physio assessment/treatment involves

11

re-habilitation may involve

12

basis of stroke rehab

neuroplasticity

13

how do we encourage neuroplasticity

14

stroke nurses

Nurses that work in acute stroke care have a wide ranging role, and are responsible for the provision of specialist services all aimed at assisting the recovery and rehabilitation of stroke survivors.

15

how do stroke nurses contribute

Nurses conduct assessments, identification and monitoring, as well as co-ordinating the all-round holistic care that is required for all patients during a hospital stay. They also liaise with multi-disciplinary team members regarding rehabilitation, psychological support, speech and language therapy and end of life care. Nurses can play a key role to inpatient stroke recovery, by being present 24/7 with the patients they have opportunities to ensure all aspects of the patients’ needs are met, helping them towards a successful recovery.

16

nurse monitoring

17

nurses and thrombolysis

18

nurse swallow screening

19

ward rounds

20

nursing assessment

21

nurse transfer

22

patient flow on the ward- nurse

23

RAP nurses

24

specialist skills of RAP nurses

25

Speech and language therapist

 

SLT’s provide specialist assessment of swallowing and communication difficulties after stroke and are involved at all stages of the stroke pathway. SLTs work directly with patients and also provide support and training for other professionals in facilitating communication and supporting implementation of dysphagia management plans such as modification of diet and fluids. They also carry out specialist assessments of swallowing such as videoflouroscopy.

26

TYPES OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS

 

  • Dysphasia / Aphasia Dysarthria
  • Dyspraxia / Apraxia of Speech
  • Dysphonia
  • Dysfluency

27

Aphasia

 

(usually caused by stroke damaging the left side of the brain- Broca’s and Wernicke’s)Difficulty with

  • Speaking
  • Understanding
  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Numbers
  • Gesture

28

Dysarthria –

speech disorder

Weakness and/or abnormal muscle tone of the muscles that move the articulators

such as the lips and tongue

Results in

  • Poor articulation ”slurred speech”
  • Poor respiration
  • Poor phonation (producing voice)
  • Poor resonance
  • Poor prosody

29

peoples speech may sound if they have dysarthria

 

  • Slurred, slow, effortful
  • Quiet
  • Hoarse
  • Prosodically abnormal

30

IMPACT OF COMMUNICATION DIFFICULTIES

 

  • Increased length of stay
  • Low mood
  • Functional outcomes- degree of independence and need for assistance in activities of daily living
  • Barriers to rehabilitation and effective clinical care e.g. accessing information
  • Psychosocial – relationships, isolation