LG2.5 Vasculature of the Nervous System Flashcards Preview

NMSK B Test 1 > LG2.5 Vasculature of the Nervous System > Flashcards

Flashcards in LG2.5 Vasculature of the Nervous System Deck (32):
1

Where do the cerebral arteries ascend through?

Transverse foramina

2

What do the vertebral arteries become when they pass through the transverse foramina after fusing?

Basilar artery

3

What arteries come of the internal carotid artery?

Anterior cerebral
Anterior communicating
Middle cerebral

4

What arteries come of the vertebral artery?

Basilar
Posterior cerebral
Posterior communicating

5

Where does the Anterior Cerebral Artery supply?

Supply most medial surface & deep structures, leg motor area.

6

Where does the Middle Cerebral Artery supply?

-Supply most lateral surface & deep structures, all motor areas except leg area

7

What is the ICA?

Internal Carotid Artery

8

Where does the ICA enter the skull?

Carotid canal

9

What is the pathway of the ICA after entering the skull?

Carotid canal to foramen lacerum

10

What are the three parts of the ICA?

Petrous. Cavernous, Cerebral

11

What artery is the most commonly affected in strokes is?

Middle carotid artery

12

What is a Saccular (berry) aneurysm?

Injury or clots in arteries of the Circle of Willis can result in neurological deficit or cranial nerve symptoms

13

What is the first branch off of the ICA after entering the cavernous sinus?

Ophthalmic artery

14

What does the ICA terminate into?

Anterior and middle cerebral arteries

15

What is the only artery supply to the retina?

opthalmic artery

16

Which nerve can affect or be affected by the ophthalmic artery?

CN II

17

What are possible signs of a ACA stroke?

-Sensorimotor deficits in contralateral foot & leg
-Urinary incontinence
-Contralateral frontal lobe signs

18

What are signs of MCA?

-Severe sensorimotor deficits in contralateral face & upper limb
-With dominant hemisphere involvement -->global aphasia (left side blowout; written & spoken language)
-With non dominant hemisphere --> neglect syndrome or amorphosynthesis

19

Where do the pontine arteries go to?

to the pons

20

What is the cerebral artery syndrome for ACA?

-Occlusion distal to the ACOM
-Contralateral Hemiparesis and hemisensory loss, mainly leg and foot

21

What is the cerebral artery syndrome for MCA?

-Contralateral hemiparesis
-Hemisensory loss, mainly face arm
-Aphasia (dominant hemisphere)

22

What is the cerebral artery syndrome for PCA?

- Visual agnosia
- Contralateral homonymous
- Hemianopia, contralateral sensory
- Loss (thalamus)

23

What is the cerebral artery syndrome for the internal carotid?

-May be well compensated
-Similar to MCA

24

What are the expected neurological defects if the dominant hemisphere (usually left) is involved?

-right hemiparesis
-right hemisensory loss
-left gaze preference
-right visual field cut
-Aphasia may result

25

What are the expected neurological defects if the non-dominant hemisphere (usually right) is involved?

-left hemiparesis
-left hemisensory loss
-Right gaze preference
-Left visual field cut may result.
-There may also be neglect when the patient has a left-sided hemi-inattention and ignores the left side.

26

What are the expected neurological deficits if the cerebellum is involved?

-Unilateral limb ataxia
-Incoordination or gait ataxia
-vertigo

27

What supplies the posterior portion of the spine?

-2 posterior spinal arteries
-Suplies 1/3 of SC

28

What supplies the anterior portion of the spinal cord?

-1 anterior spinal artery
- supplies 2/3 of spinal cord

29

Where do the spinal arteries normally arise from?

vertebral arteries

30

What happens with vertebral-basilar artery occlusion?

-Supply all parts of the posterior cranial fossa, and contribute to PCA
-Ipsilateral pain/temp loss face
-Contralateral loss of body pain/face
-Homonymous hemianopia (occipital lobe)
-Ipsilateral loss of gag reflex, dysphagia, and hoarseness.

31

What are the effects if you have a stroke in the anterior spinal artery?

-Total motor paralysis and dissociated sensory loss below the level of the lesion.
-Sensory loss is dissociated, loss of pain and temperature, but position and vibration sense is intact.

32

Which sins us may mimic or cause ear pain?

Transverse sinus