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Flashcards in Midterm Deck (50):
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thesis

And argument, an expression of the claim that the Raiders speaker is trying to support. An essay, an expression of the main idea or purpose of the piece of writing.

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claim

A statement or assertion that is open to challenge and that requires support

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support

back up with details and evidence

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hook

attention device used to gain readers interest

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transition

A word or phrase that links one idea to the next and carries the reader from sentence to sentence, paragraph to paragraph

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MLA

modern language Association; guidelines for documenting and citing sources during a research project

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parenthetic citation

MLA in text citation typically consisting of the source authors name and page number in parentheses or in the case of no author, a keyword from the title. (Smith 19)

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works cited

an alphabetical list, and Emily format, that gives the full bibliographic information for all the sources you have cited in your paper. It is there for a reader who wants to go find articles you read

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formal diction

usually found in academic essays and formal discussion. Were choice that is more dignified and professional; less personal. No slang, no casual language, no contractions, and no clichés

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common noun

General name of a person place or thing

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proper noun

names a particular person, place, thing, or idea. Mrs. Smith, Walled Lake Western, Mustang, Metaphysics

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compound noun

two or more words used together as a single now. Basketball.

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collective noun

a noun that is singular in form but refers to a group of people or things

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antecedent

something that comes before; every pronoun refers back to a previous noun or pronoun

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personal pronoun

represents a specific person place or thing (we, you, it)

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indefinite pronoun

A pronoun that does not refer to a specific person place thing or idea; Examples: everyone, everything, everybody, anybody, many, most, few, each, some, someone, all, nothing, nobody, and no one

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reflexive pronoun

refers to the subject and directs the action of the verb back to the subject. Example: the soccer player kicked himself in the ankle

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intensive pronoun

emphasizes its antecedent; adds emphasis to pronoun or named noun; examples: I myself will go

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demonstrative pronoun

A word that points out a specific person place or thing: This, that, these, those

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interrogative pronoun

introduces a question: Who went with you?

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adjective

A word that modifies a noun or pronoun

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predicate

one of the two main parts of a sentence or clause, modifying the subjects including the verb, objects, or phrases governed by the verb

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adverb

A word that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb. Austin adverbs end in ly

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action verb

A verb that expresses either physical or mental activity; run, jump, think, dream

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linking verb

connects the subject to a word that renames or describes it, state of being verbs. The students are smart. The flowers smell nice

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helping verb

helps the main verb express action or state of being; the boys will run the race. I have done my homework

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verb phrase

contains the main verb and helping verbs

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direct object

The object that receives the direct action of the verb, gets the action done to it. The dog ate my homework. What got eaten? Homework

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transitive verb

an action verb that had a direct object; the dog ate my homework. (transitive verb ate)

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indirect object

A noun, pronoun, or word group that often appears and sentences containing direct objects. Tells to home or to what the action of a transitive verb is done. Usually comes before the direct object. The teacher gave the students their homework. Students is a indirect object because they are being given the homework(direct object)

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fiction

a story that is not true or is made up

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non-fiction

a type of literature that tells about real life people, places, events, things, etc.

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expository

The purpose of the author is to inform, explain, describe, or define his or her subject to the reader

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argument

A single assertion or a series of assertions presented and defended by the writer

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summarize

to capture all the most important parts of the original story, but express them in a much Shorter space, and in readers own words

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analyze

breakdown in order to bring out the essential elements or structure. To identify parts, relationships, and interpret information to reach conclusions.

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theme

A central message, concern or insight into life expressing a literary work. a main idea the author wants to share with his readers

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setting

the context in time and place in which the action if a story occurs

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point of view

in literature, the perspective from which a story is told. (first person, third person, omniscient)

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complex characters

round characters, characters that are more fully developed and three-dimensional. They tend to be more realistic and appeal to our emotions. George and Lennie are both complex characters

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flat characters

characters who are simple and one-dimensional. We don't see many size of their personalities. Curley was a flat character

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static characters

characters that remain the same throughout the story

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dynamic characters

characters would change significantly are called dynamic characters. Usually they have some sort of realization that changes them. Candy was a dynamic character. He realizes that he should have shot his dog himself. He begins to take control of his own life

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plot

sequence of events in a story, the action

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exposition

background information presented in a literary work

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rising action

A series of events that builds from the conflicts. It begins with the inciting force and ends with the climax

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internal conflict

A struggle between opposing needs, desires, or emotions within a single character

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external conflict

The character struggles against some outside force: another character, society as a whole, or some natural force

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climax

that point in a plot that creates the greatest intensity, suspense, or interest; usually the point just before the conflict is resolved

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falling action

events after the climax, leading to the resolution