Midterm 2: Additional Problem Behaviours in Dogs Flashcards Preview

ANSC 378 - Companion Animal Behaviour > Midterm 2: Additional Problem Behaviours in Dogs > Flashcards

Flashcards in Midterm 2: Additional Problem Behaviours in Dogs Deck (30)
Loading flashcards...
1
Q

Leash pulling in dogs
- what type of problem is it
- what happens when dogs feel restraint
- what to do

A
  • TRAINING PROBLEM
  • when a dog feels restraint, it naturally pulls harder, trying to break free
  • instead, teach your dog to walk at or near your heel, keep pace with you and sit or stop when you stop
2
Q

Why do dogs chew? When does it become a problem?

A
  • Dogs start chewing as puppies to relieve the pain
  • Becomes a problem when a dog does not grow out of it and it becomes destructive
  • Dogs will chew when they are bored, lonely, anxious or stressed, or linked to activity levels
3
Q

How to can you treat chewing in dogs?

A
  • Puppy-proof home
  • Re-direct the behaviour to an acceptable chew toy
  • Use a deterrent to make unacceptable chew items unappealing
  • Supervise
  • Don’t allow puppy to chew objects that resemble “off-limits” items
  • Praise good behaviour
  • Provide adequate physical activity and people time
4
Q

Why do dogs dig?

A
  • to escape
  • to find a cool spot
  • to bury a bone/object
  • frustrated or bored
  • to seek an object or prey
  • attention seeking
5
Q

What are the recommendations for digging?

A
  • recommendations based on the cause
  • reinforce good behaviour or where digging can be redirected
  • not helpful to punish after the fact
6
Q

What is escape behaviour in dogs? Causes? Resolutions?

A
  • as creatures of habit, dogs accept and learn a consistent routine; confined dogs are often subjected to erratic routines
  • wild canids have a home hunting range of several square miles that may include several den sires

Causes
- enviro outside is rewarding
- inconsistent outing schedule
- enclosure not secure

Resolution
- make enclosure secure
- schedule routine outings
- do not give attention for escape behaviour
- remote punishment

7
Q

What are the causes and resolution for roaming behaviour?

A

Causes
- attraction of distance places
- no reward for staying home
- look for pattern: why and when the dog roams

Resolution
- eliminate distant attractions
- neuter
- remote punishment R+ for staying home

8
Q

Aside from housetraining issues, what are 5 other causes of soiling?

A
  1. medical
  2. Submissive/excitement urination
  3. Territorial urine-marking
  4. Separation anxiety
  5. Fears or phobias
9
Q

What is inappropriate elimination in adult dogs? Causes? Resolutions?

A
  • Dogs have an instinctive tendency to keep den and rest areas clean, need to generalize that to entire house
  • common acts of punishment hinder house-training

Causes
- medical problem or behavioural senility
- disturbance of normal house-training
- weak den sanitation predisposition

Resolution
- treat medical or primary behavioural cuases
- reinstate house-training
- schedule frequent trips outside
- clean soiled areas
- remote punishment

10
Q

What is submissive urination? Causes? Resolution?

A
  • In the ancestral wolf pack, this type of behaviour has the fxn of inhibiting aggressive approaches from dominant individuals
  • if an owner scolds the dog for submissive urination, a vicious cycle begins

Causes
- natural response to preclude aggression by dominants
- punishment exacerbates
- prominent during greetings

Resolution
- tone down greetings
- desensitize by staging multiple greetings

11
Q

What is attention-seeking behaviour? Causes? Resolution?

A
  • Behaviour results in a payoff (attention, affection, social contact)
  • Attention seeking behaviours almost defy categorization (chasing shadows, barking at light, snapping at imaginary flies, vomiting, lameness etc.); always rule out medical reasons first

Causes
- attracts attention from owner
- competing pets
- may stem initially from medical problem

Resolution
- no attention for problem behaviour
- social punishment when the behaviour occurs
- attention only for good behaviour

12
Q

What are 3 common reasons for jumping in dogs?

A
  1. want to greet at face level
  2. seeking attention
  3. testing whether their position in the group is dominant or subordinate to yours

*be consistent, don’t give attention to the behaviour, use incompatible behaviours, prevent when possible

13
Q

What is gorging behaviour? How do you resolve it

A
  • Like wolves, most dogs eat rapidly
  • Can be socially facilitated
  • More likely in competitive enviros; dom animals get larger portion, subordinate at risk of becoming undernourished

Make sure there is plenty of food spread out in separate areas. May use enrichment tools to slow down eating behaviour.

14
Q

What are 4 problem feeding behaviours?

A
  1. Gorging
  2. Conditioned food aversions
  3. Eating grass
  4. Coprophagy
15
Q

Conditioned food aversions

A
  • food likes and dislikes can reflect acquired aversions as well as acquired tastes
  • an acquired aversion may derive from a food that made the dog sick in the past = GARCIA EFFECT (an aversion to the food last eaten before being sick)
16
Q

Grass eating

A
  • Not completely sure why dogs do this, not strongly linked to the dog being sick
  • Occurs mostly in normal dogs and is not usually followed by vomiting
  • Studies looking into whether it plays a role in expelling intestinal parasites
17
Q

Coprophagy

A
  • No widely recognized explanation
  • Considered an attention-seeking behaviour; dogs that habitually consume their own feces are often confined or receive little human interaction
  • Small breeds may be more prone
  • would be maladaptive in nature bc there is no survival benefit
  • can lace fecal droppings with an averse substance (Deter)
18
Q

What are 2 general potential maternal behaviour concerns?

A
  1. Maternal indifference
    - mother is not very attentive
    - many be the result of endocrine changes or a hormonal defect or only 1 puppy born in a litter not providing enough stimulation
  2. Cannibalism
    - various theories as to why: nutritional stress of the dam, weak or sick offspring, enviro stressors
19
Q

What are abnormal behaviours?

A
  • behavioural vices and stereotypies; may be pathological signs or a method of coping with difficult conditions
  • must assess as a matter of context
  • figure out the causal factors
20
Q

What is the continuum of abnormal behaviours?

A

Normal Behaviour, Behaviour Vices, Abnormal Repetitive Behaviour, Sterotypies

21
Q

What are behaviour vices?

A

Re-directed behaviours, repetitive, no OBVIOUS goal or fxn
- a “normal” behaviour that has been re-directed

22
Q

What are Abnormal Repetitive Behaviours?

A
  • if over time a behaviour vice is not mitigated it can become an ARB
  • difference btw vice and ARB is that it’s still a redirected behaviour but MUCH more frequent
  • when things are repeated: 1) sequences gets abbreviated 2) threshold is lower
23
Q

What is a stereotypy?

A
  • most severe form of abnormal behaviour
  • eventually becomes detached from its original stimulus
  • more repetitive the behaviour becomes, the more abbreviated the behaviour sequence
  • no feedback mechanism to tell the animal to stop
24
Q

What are the 3 criteria for stereotypies?

A
  1. Behaviour is repetitive
  2. Behaviour has no OBVIOUS goal or fxn
    - might be dealing with a displacement behaviour which makes the fxn even less obvious
  3. Behaviour has a fixed action pattern
25
Q

What are coping strategies?

A
  1. Active Coping
    - performance of behavioural vices, stereotypies, etc.
  2. Passive Coping
    - lethargic animals
26
Q

What are 4 types of stereotypies?

A
  1. tail chasing
  2. flank sucking
  3. fly snapping
  4. acral lick dermatitis
27
Q

What are 4 causes of sterotypies?

A
  1. onset can sometimes be related to confinement, boredom, conflict, and/or isolation
  2. skin disorders or disorder of grooming control in acral lick dermatitis
  3. neurotransmitter abnormality
  4. learned behavior from endorphin release (R+)
28
Q

What are 4 resolutions to sterotypies?

A
  1. alleviate stress, conflict and boredom
  2. allow wound to heal and licking restraint in acral lick dermatitis
  3. structure environment and interaction with caregiver
  4. drugs
29
Q

What are signs to watch for in aging dogs?

A
  1. hearing and vision impairment
  2. arthritis
  3. dental problems
  4. anxieties
  5. irritable aggression
  6. house soiling
  7. sleep-wake cycle problems
  8. cognitive dysfxn or impairment
30
Q

Selecting and raising puppies

A
  • RAISE A PUPPY WITH ADULT BEHAVIOUR IN MIND
  • socialization period (3-12 wks)
  • puppy temperament testing (hard to predict reliably)
  • reputable sources
  • good health (starting taking to the vet early in life)