Module 1 - Human Movement Across Lifespan Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Module 1 - Human Movement Across Lifespan Deck (20):
1

Define Human Movement

 

"Human movement is the end product of an intentional or unintentional joint motion and/or muscle activity and may take many forms or manifestations."  It can be described as being related to mobility, function, occupation, leisure and or communication.

 

 

2

What does gaining control of the head allow the baby to do? (at 3 months)

 

Develop refined movement such as hand-eye coordination: the baby then can watch the movements of their hands and fingers, and use their hands to explore their environment through movements like touching, reaching and grasping (manipulation) 

3

What are the characteristics of the newborn’s movements?

- Head turning

- Sucking for feeding

- Bringing a hand to mouth

- Wriggling fingers and toes

- Strong kicking. eg., Bicycling of the legs A

- facial expressions 

4

What intrinsic factors helps to develop movement patterns in the early years? (the first 6 years)

- Maturity of the system (integrity)

- Eye hand coordination

- Fine motor skills

- Trunk and head control

- muscle Strength

- Integration of sensory information

5

What extrinsic factors helps to develop movement patterns in the early years?

 

Social environmental factors:

- Space, Type of environment,  nutrition, social interation,  exploration of the environmenet (play)

6

Mobility could also be defined as: 

 

 

the ability or capacity to move and also the ease or freedom of that movement

 


 

7

In studying movement across the lifespan, we could also divide them into these 3 categories:

 

  1. Personal
  2. Social 
  3. Environmental factors

Factors affecting movement throughout lifespan -

Personal factors: the individuality of human movement, lifestyle choices and motivation. play, education and sport; the work environment; and continual skill acquisition.

Social factors : family, community and cultural influences; social expectations and cultural norms; and political influences.

Environmental factors : the home environment; opportunities for play, education and sport; the work environment; and continual skill acquisition.

8

What is the role of playing in the developent of motor control in babies?

 

- Developing motor movements: gross, fine, sensory.


 

9

What motivates children to move?

What is the role of playing in the development of motor control in children?

 

 

Children is motivated to learn about themselves and others through play 

- learn to refine their movements/ develop physical skills: develop motor skills as they run, jump, chase each other.

- movement stimulate growth of bone, muscle

- develop posture control, balance

- social interaction:  learn social skills needed in life in their culture and community, what it means to take turns, share, and being part of group or team. 

 

10

What are some of the intrinsic factors that influence human movements in adolescence? 

 

- Rapid growth and developing body,  changing weight & height ratio

Eg, rapid growth spurts of the femur and tibia, when combined with sports can cause some teen to experience pain at the insertion of the quadriceps attached by the patella tendon. 

 

Self esteem, confidence and motivation affects their decisions to move or not. 

11

What are some of the intrinsic factors that influence human movement in older adulthood?  One example?

-Physiological changes and challenges:

- loss of elasticity in tissues, skin becomes thinner, and joints produce less synovial fluid.  (stiffness in joints)

- Disease: eg, osteoporosis,  Kyphosis throacic - curving of the spine, changing their posture, balance, 

 

 

12

Describe a change in posture from an adolescent to an older adult

Posture:-postural changes from young to old

Spinal curvature, stepping gain, arm swing, losing hip and knee extension, poorer balance:  distribute weight evenly on both legs to remain steady and upright is compromised. (sensory motor changes can be a result from age and or disuse. 

 

 

 

13

What is posture?

Is the position in which we hold our body up when standing or sitting, against gravity. 

- How we carry about body overall,  

Natural curvature of the spine, limbs, 

14

Describe two changes in the walking pattern that happens as we age:

Gait speed -  slower strides, reduced stride length, difficulty clearing the toe during swing phrase,  (compromised by joint mobility and muscle strength?)

15

 space available for the movement and muscle strength are under what category of factors that affects movement?

extrinsic and intrinsic factors

16

Jane is an 11-month-old baby who was born with arthrogryposis multiplex congenital (AMC). This rare condition is believed to occur due to decreased fetal movement during development in the womb and is characterized by multiple joint contractures in more than one body part. (http://www.amcsupport.org/) Her peers are able to stand with support and some are starting to take their first steps.

How do you think Jane's condition will affect her movements and the acquisition of refined movement patterns?

Choose all that apply.

 

Select all that apply:

a. Jane will likely develop normally and she should take her first steps soon

b. Jane may have joint deformities that could impact her movement patterns

c. Jane may require assistive devices or modifications to her environment

d. Jane will be unable to walk or interact with her environment

e. Jane's ability to walk or stand may be impaired

b. Jane may have joint deformities that could impact her movement patterns

c. Jane may require assistive devices or modifications to her environment

e. Jane's ability to walk or stand may be impaired

17

How do babies progress to walking?  Describe the steps.

1. supine reflexive kicking pattern and pushing up onto hands (development of core and trunk strength)

2. sitting upright (hands are free to develop fine motor skills

3. Sequence/ transitional movement: rolling (flexing and extending head, body, limbs, hips neck

4. crawling (building shoulder srength, improving hand function, developing sensory stimuli, motor development

5. upright standing: require leg strength and balance (proportionally heavy head); strong squatting posture further allow development of hand skills

6. Cruising (side stepping, leaning, walking pattern, musculokeletal vestibular balance, visusal, proprioceptive

7. Independent walking 

18

What are some of the intrinsic factors that influence human movement in adolescents?

Physical and Psychological factors

Personal lifestyle choices, self esteem, confidence, image, self motivation, set backs from failure, coping mechanisms, successes, rewards, satisfaction.  

Rapidly growing and developing, changing weight and height ratio, health status, 

the desire to be free from pain or injury

Muscle strength, endurance, motor coordination, 

desire to play and acquire skills

19

What are some wider social network factors that could influence movement in people?

Social expectations 

Social policy

Cultural norms and values 

 

20

Tessa and Scott is raised in a nice home, parents could pay for skiing lessons, pay for university, their work place offers them the chance to be active. 

What factors are a play here to influence movement?

Environmental factors.