Module 1 - Intro to MH Science, Well-being, Resiliency Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Module 1 - Intro to MH Science, Well-being, Resiliency Deck (30)
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1
Q

Define “well-being”

A

Well-being is an overall state of feeling comfortable, healthy, and happy. It is made up of many components, one of which is mental health.

2
Q

Define “mental health”

A

Mental health includes psychological, emotional, and social aspects of thinking, feeling, and behaving. Mental health is a prerequisite to realizing potential, being able to cope with normal life stress, and being productive at work and school.

3
Q

List three components of well-being.

A
  1. Mental health
  2. Physical health
  3. Supportive/secure environment
4
Q

List the four aspects that make up mental health.

A
  1. Realizing potential (feeling like you’re making a meaningful contribution)
  2. Emotional health (ability to regulate feelings across different challenges)
  3. Psychological health (how you think about things/regulate feelings)
  4. Social connectedness (creating + maintaining good relationships; developing empathy)
5
Q

List the levels of the mental health spectrum (from least to most severe)

A
  1. Well
  2. Symptoms
  3. Concerns or problems
  4. Disorders or illness
6
Q

Define the “well” level of the mental health spectrum.

A

Reflected in feeling content, capable and happy. Stress and disappointment are mostly manageable. Any associated comfort short-lived. Healthy lifestyle, good psychological coping, and supportive relationships to help maintain resilience.

7
Q

Define the “symptoms” level of the mental health spectrum.

A

Experiences that can be associated with some distress (may be situational and not indicative of a problem). Symptoms may be transient and subside when challenges arise. Can also be jelped by lifestyle changes. Persistent symptoms may reflect an MH concern.

8
Q

Define the “concerns or problems” level of the mental health spectrum.

A

Persistent stressors may induce prolonged feelings of discomfort, but are not necessarily reflective of a diagnosable mental disorder. Support and problem-focused counselling can be helpful. (ie. emotional difficulty coping with the death of a loved one, or finding uni transition difficult).

9
Q

Define the “disorders, conditions, or illness” level of the mental health spectrum.

A

Mental disorders refer to clinically diagnosed illnesses that require evidence-based treatments provided by health care professionals. Clinically significant symptoms that impact day-to-day functioning.

10
Q

T/F: You may not have a diagnosable mental illness, but you could be experiencing significant distress.

A

True

11
Q

T/F: You cannot have a diagnosed mental illness and experiencing positive well-being at the same time

A

False

12
Q

List the factors that are contributing to the increasing demand for mental health services among uni students.

A
  • At risk age (uni transition @ same time as accelerated brain growth)
  • Transition period (encountering new academic, financial, social stressors)
  • Vulnerable brain (emergent adult brain = vulnerable to stressful environment)
  • Lacking support (resources are limited)
  • Decrease in stigma (more students are reporting problems + seeking care)
13
Q

Wellbeing and mental health can be sorted into 7 goals… what are they?

A
  1. Community
  2. Social
  3. Recreational
  4. Career
  5. Academic
  6. Relationships
  7. Cultural
14
Q

Define “cognition”

A

The mental processes involved in thinking, decision-making, learning, and comprehension.

15
Q

Define “self-efficacy”

A

The extent to which someone believes in their ability to achieve a certain outcome.

16
Q

What are the 5 important + related concepts to consider when talking about mental health?

A
  1. Risk factors
  2. Protective factors
  3. Stressors
  4. Resilience
  5. Signs and symptoms
17
Q

What is a “risk factor”? List examples.

A

A biological, pyshc. or socio. characteristic that is associated with higher likelihood of a negative outcome.

  • Not getting enough sleep
  • Using recreational drugs
  • Not having a reliable support
  • Having prior history of a mental health condition
  • Overthinking + avoidance
18
Q

What are “protective factors”? List examples

A

A characteristic that lowers the likelihood of negative outcomes/reduces a risk factor’s impact.

  • Having a reliable support network
  • Developing a good study-life balance
  • Feeling included
  • Positive thinking, journaling, talking
19
Q

What are “stressors”? List examples

A

A person, place or situation that causes a state of strain or tension. Stress = psych respons to a stressor

  • Upcoming test
  • Relationship problems
20
Q

Describe the “psychodynamic model” on mental disorders.

A

(Late 19th/early 20th century - dev. Sigmund Freud)

Proposes that the processes of the mind involve the interplay of psychological forces. Distress arises because the conscious interpretation of these forces masks their true unconscious origin. The relationship with the therapist is seen as key to resolving.

21
Q

Describe the “behavioural model” on mental disorders.

A

(1950s - Pavlov, Watson, and Skinner)

How you behave day-to-day is ‘conditioned’ due to the reinforcement you receive for your actions. A harmless stimulus has been linked to extreme fear (maladaptive learning has taken place)

22
Q

Define “behaviour therapy” : which historical theory/theories does it solve?

A

Behaviour therapy aims to reverse anxiety and phobias by introducing a less negative association with a harmless stimulus. It focuses on overcoming avoidance (Behavioural model; cognitive model)

23
Q

Define “medical/disease model” on mental disorders.

A

(Based on work of Aristotle, Galen and Hippocrates)

Views problems of mental functioning from a disease perspective with a biological basis at the core. Emphasizes recovery through somatic treatment.

24
Q

Define “cognitive model” on mental disorders.

A

Many major contributors!

Proposes that mental disorders are the result of errors in thinking or biases. Perspectives of yourself and the world are a result of your thinking, which can cause upset and mental disorders.

25
Q

Define “biopsychosocial model” on mental disorders.

A

(Introduced by George L. Engel - 1977)

Emphasizes interacting roles between biology and psychological processes. Modern use of this model emphasizes the three factors (biology, psych., social) are not always equal in their role in determining mental illness

26
Q

What alternative is there to the biophyschosocial model?

A

Osler medical humanist model

27
Q

Define “social and cultural models” on mental disorders.

A

Focuses on broader holistic community-based influences on mental health. Emphasizes providing support through addressing contributing factors.

28
Q

Define “distal”. List examples of distal risk factors.

A

A factor that represents an indirect cause or underlying vulnerability for a particular condition.

  • Family history
  • Past emotional support
  • Safe/nurturing env (or lack thereof)
  • Peer bullying
29
Q

Define “proximal”. List examples of proximal risk factors.

A

A factor that represents a direct cause or immediate vulnerability for a particular condition.

  • Sleep problems
  • Hard substance abuse
  • Lack of regular exercise
  • Reduced social support
  • Low self-esteem
30
Q
A